Getting Around Detroit

  • Detroit Metropolitan Airport (DTW)
    by machomikemd
  • Detroit Metropolitan Airport (DTW)
    by machomikemd
  • Detroit Metropolitan Airport (DTW)
    by machomikemd

Most Viewed Transportation in Detroit

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    Delta Airlines

    by machomikemd Written Nov 21, 2013

    my all time fave airline. Now Merged with Northwest Airlines and Both are Under the Delta Airline Chain. I have collected many MR's on Delta and used them well. Delta primarily operates a hub and spoke route system with hubs in Amsterdam, Detroit, Memphis, Minneapolis/St. Paul, Atlanta, Salt Lake City and Tokyo. Delta is the world's Second largest airline in terms of domestic and international scheduled passenger miles flown and the U.S.'s second largest airline in terms of domestic passenger miles flown. In addition to operating one of the largest domestic route networks in the U.S., Delta carries more passengers across the Pacific Ocean than any other U.S. carrier hence it is a favorite of people like me for it's frequent transpacific flights and the easy accruage of air mileage in its delta skymiles. After the United-Continental merger, Delta became the world's second largest airline in terms of passenger traffic. Delta operates an extensive domestic and international network, spanning North America, South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, the Middle East, the Caribbean and Australia. Delta and the Delta Connection carriers fly to 367 destinations in 66 countries (excluding codeshare), across six continents.Delta operates the world's largest hub at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. And the second largest hub here at the Mc Namara Terminal of the Detroit Wayne Metrolopitan Airport. Delta Air Lines is a founding member of the SkyTeam alliance.

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    WINDSOR/DETROIT TUNNEL BUS

    by LoriPori Written Jun 24, 2009

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    The WINDSOR/DETROIT TUNNEL BUS operates a cross-border service through the Windsor/Detroit Tunnel, seven days a week. Its a short route through downtown Detroit, including Cobo Hall, Jos Louis Arena, Greektown and Hart Plaza.
    On Tuesday, June 22, 2009, Hans and I were to meet up with a VT member at Hart Plaza. So instead of driving over to Detroit, we decided to take the Tunnel Bus. Buses leave from the Windsor International Transit Terminal at 300 Chatham Street West.
    I bought tickets for two persons, return fare. Each way is $3.75 or $15.00 for 4 tickets. Buses run about every half hour. When you board the bus, insert your ticket in the box at the front near the driver. The driver does not make change, so you either have to have a ticket or exact fare. Proof of citizenship is required when crossing the international Windsor-Detroit border. With the New requirements in effect June 1, 2009, you must have a valid passport.
    Upon crossing the tunnel, the bus will let you off at customs and immigration. After a short interview, you will be allowed back on the bus.
    The bus route takes you right on Jefferson, left on Beaubien Street where Greektown is and that is the first stop. Continues on Congress Street. left on Woodward, right on Jefferson to Cobo Hall (stop), right on Washington Blvd., left on Fort Street, right on Carr Ave., right on Grand River, right on Washington Blvd., left on Cadillac Square, right on Griswold, left on Jefferson - back to the Tunnel.
    The Tunnel Bus can include a stop at Caesars Windsor on the way back to Windsor. We were told by the first bus driver to ask the driver on the return trip to bring us to Caesars Windsor.
    Special events Service is $4.00 each way or $16.00 for 4 tickets.

    Tunnel Bus on Jefferson Detroit side entrance to tunnel Windsor Transit Terminal

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    The Speed Limit is 65

    by TRimer Updated Sep 5, 2008

    I always wondered why my husband had a lead foot. I think it can be attributed to the fact that he grew up in Detroit and the speed limit in Michigan is 65 which means that people tend to drive over 80 mphs.

    According to Joe, having the 3 major car manufacturers in Detroit warrants the higher speed limits. The implication is that the city is just one big test drive for them.

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    Getting to Detroit from Chicago

    by midnight_mike Written Apr 21, 2007

    To get to Detroit from Chicago, take Interstate 94 east for about 4 hours until you see the signs for the city. The speed limit in Michigan is 70 miles per hour, so you will be flying through the state. If it is snowing, which is possible between November and March, it may take an extra hour or two. Just watch out for deer during mating season in November. Check the weather reports before traveling.

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    Under Construction

    by TRimer Updated Sep 12, 2006

    Be aware that a lot of the roads around Detroit are currently under construction. The excuse for a while was that the repairs were to get the city ready for the 2005/6 Super Bowl - but they have continued. Detroit has poor roads so they are needed. If you are driving, make sure you have alternate routes in mind.

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    Motor vehicles in the Motor City

    by YoGazpacho Written May 17, 2006

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    The first stop sign, paved road, and car were all made in Detroit. Detroit has definitely been developed to be a car friendly environment. In order to get the real Detroit feel, it is essential to use an automobile as your main form of transportation.

    The suburbs are also an important part of the whole Metro Detroit area, and the quickest, safest and easiest way to visit the neighboring 'burbs is by car.

    Hopefully within the next decade or so the public transportation options will increase and improve.

    photo from the AutoShow
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    Bad Roads?

    by bilgeez Updated Apr 21, 2006

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    Detroit had a reputation for having some bad road damage.
    Recently, this has been addressed and many of the main roads (Interstates and major city streets) have been repaired and are in good to excellent condition.
    Much of I-94 in through the Detroit area has been completely repaved. It was stripped down to the original concrete roadbed and new asphalt courses placed on top. The bridges over I-94 were sandblasted and repainted, many of them were stipped to their steel framework and rebuilt. Also, I-696 and I-75 have had extensive repairs done in the past few years. So, if you are going to drive to Detroit or rent a car in this area, you need not worry too much about the conditions of the main roads and freeways. As long as we don't have a blizzard, there should be no problems. However, there are constant road repairs in the area, especially in the warmer months. Please check the website below for major repair projects and if they will seriously affect driving. (Some repairs require road closures for some period of time from a few hours to a few days. Some closures are intermittent over several months!)
    But all to keep our roads safe and reasonably sound.
    See below for the State of Michigan website that announces lane closures due to road repairs.

    Repairs to I-94 in 2001
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    Getting Around Detroit

    by bilgeez Written Apr 21, 2006

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    I am a native Detroiter. As others have mentioned on this site, there are two ways to get around Detroit:
    CARS and CARS.
    Detroit has about THE WORST public transit system IN THE WORLD!
    If you must use it, here is some info on mass transit in the Detroit area:
    Buses run every day but some routes the bus only comes once an hour or so. The routes are very convoluted in many cases. You can view and print out bus maps from DOT Detroit and SMART. Make sure you find out where you are going, FIRST, many drivers are not very helpful or not sure where you need to go. So asking for help from a driver may be a futile exercise.
    There are two seperate bus systems; DOT which is mainly just in Detroit and SMART, which covers the suburbs. The two are not integrated and you can't just transfer from one to the other. Some SMART commuter or "express" routes go from the suburbs to downtown Detroit, but only at certain times during the week, not in the evening or on weekends. Check on this before you travel!
    Cabs are realtively safe, they have to be registered and have a special tag on the trunk (boot) that indicates they are a registered taxi. The driver also has to display his license in the cab. Don't take a "cab" without these items. Even limo services must display these.
    If you rent a car, get a good map, because the roads are convoluted and it is easy to get lost here.
    Good Luck and enjoy Detroit and Southeast Michigan!

    DDOT Bus
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    FREE TRANSPORTATION FROM SUBURBS TO CASINO

    by dtownkitty Written Sep 6, 2005

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    Blue Lakes Charters and Tours offers transportation from many of the Detroit Suburbs to the Motor City Casino in Detroit. For $15.00 you get round trip transportation and a $15.00 credit for gambling. So essentially it is FREE. And you may get lucky. See their website for pick up locations and times.

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    Hey, this is the Motor City!

    by dtownkitty Updated Jul 21, 2005

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    You will find that public trans stinks here. While the people mover will get you to most major attractions you want to go inside the downtown area such as ball parks, Cobo & Joe Louis, Jefferson ave hotels, & Greektown, you will find yourself stuck if you want to travel to other areas of the city. And, you generally won't find cabs lined up outside of hotels like in other cities. You'll have to call one. Why? This is the Motor City! You are expected to own at least three cars and if you don't, well then that's your problem and you should buy one before you leave! Outside of the city center Detroit is not very walkable. Things are very spread out . Rent/drive your own to visit MGM, Motor City Casino, the museum campus, Windsor, Eastern Market, and other nearby towns.

    P. S. The downtown is not as unsafe as its reputation, however, once you get too far from the woodward/Jefferson area you can easily make a turn into a scary place, so make sure you have good directions to where you're going.

    P.P.S. Take a tip from my homeless friend Ricky and stay away from Cass ave south of the Wayne State area. In his words, "they'll stab you and steal your money". And if you see Ricky treat him to an ice cream for me.

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  • Street Names

    by Detroit_Mike Written Apr 29, 2005

    Thanks to the French we have some streets and cities that are hard to pronounce unless you have lived here all your life.

    Gratiot=Gra-shut

    Lahser=Lasher or Lah-sir depending on the person.

    Schoenherr=Shay-nur

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    More Driving Tips

    by GottaTry Written Apr 27, 2005

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    Road Conditions; Detroit streets are in notoriously bad condition. A combination of heavy trucks, regular freeze and thaw cycles and poor patch jobs conspire to crack and break the road surfaces into rubble. Pot holes can be huge. Hitting one could mean a flat tire, bent rim or worse. Swerving suddenly to miss one may mean hitting that guy that is trying to pass on your right.

    Street Names; Freeways and streets may change names or be called by different names.
    Typically Detroiters refer to Freeways by their names; Suburbanites refer to them by their number. For instance I-75 can also be called the Chrysler Freeway, I-94 the Ford Freeway, I-10 the Lodge Freeway. On the north side of the city streets are numbered by mile, i.e. 5 Mile, 6 Mile, etc. This is great, makes things easy! That is until you realize that in some areas 5 Mile Rd. is Fenkell, 6 Mile Rd. is McNichols, 8 Mile Rd. is Baseline and so on.

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    Driving in Detroit

    by GottaTry Written Apr 27, 2005

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    For the most part, getting around in Detroit means driving. If you’re not lucky enough to have a local to do this for you then you will need a car.

    Take care; driving in Detroit can be a challenge on many different levels.

    Street layout; the downtown streets were originally laid out in a wheel and spoke pattern. This means streets intersect at odd angles. Many streets are also one way. Maybe this worked well for horses and wagons but it makes for a real mess when you involve cars. Get a map and study it well before you head out. If you plan to just move around the downtown area park and take the People Mover (more on that later).

    Driving Style; People in Detroit tend to drive as if the devil is on their heels. That means fast and aggressive. A signal light changing from green to yellow is an indication to speed up, not slow down. Passing is done on the right and left. On surface streets it is regular practice to pass on the right even in a lane that is used for parking. A game of “chicken” will ensue to see which driver will back off and let the other lead. If you go the speed limit you may find a car directly on your bumper urging you so go faster. Just try to stay out of the way and you will be fine.

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    Transportation choices are to drive or to drive

    by mdchachi Updated Feb 25, 2005

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    Pretty much the only way to get around Detroit and its environs is by car. Buses are generally not used except by locals and there are no trains. There is, however, a driver-less elevated light rail that goes in a loop around the city center so at least you can park one place and take the train to all the downtown locations. The monorail is called The People Mover and costs fifty cents to ride (more details about this in my People Mover transportation tip).

    Detroit transportation

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    DDOT

    by Juice183 Updated Jan 27, 2005

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    The bus isn't a very good way to get around Detroit. There's always talk about making a good system, but it's just that, talk. Nothing ever materializes. There's no subway, although one was planned during the thirties. Hopefully, this problem (among other ones) will be fixed. The problem, however, will be securing enough money.

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