Glen Arbor Favorites

  • heaps and heaps of silica
    heaps and heaps of silica
    by yooperprof
  • rushing down the dune
    rushing down the dune
    by yooperprof
  • It's a long climb back
    It's a long climb back
    by yooperprof

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    Why "Sleeping Bear"?

    by yooperprof Written Mar 1, 2003
    rushing down the dune

    Favorite thing: The Ojibway tell the story of the creation of Sleeping Bear Dunes and the Manitou island. "Long ago, in the land that is today Wisconsin, Mother Bear and her two cubs were driven into Lake Michigan by a raging forest fire. The cubs swam strongly but the distance and the cold water proved too much for them. They fell further and further behind and ultimately slipped beneath the waves. When Mother Bear reached the Michigan shore, she climbed to the top of the bluff and peered back across the water, searching vainly for her cubs. The Great Spirit saw her and took pity on her plight. He raised North and South Manitou Islands to mark the place where her cubs had vanished, and He laid a slumber upon Mother Bear." Where she rested is now the rugged clifftops of Sleeping Bear Dunes.

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    What are "the Great Lakes"?

    by yooperprof Written Mar 1, 2003
    steely blue water on gray blue day

    Favorite thing: THE GREAT LAKES = "the group of five fresh-water lakes in the central part of north america, between Canada and the United States. . . From Duluth MN at the western end of Lake Superior, to outlet of Lake Ontario, they stretch 1160 miles. The combined surface area of the great lakes is about 95,000 square miles." Many geographers believe that Lakes Michigan and Huron should really be considered as one lake, because they are at the same altitude above sea level, and no significant barrier lies between them - unless you consider the Straits of Mackinac a barrier. (The Straits of Mackinac are five miles wide at their narrowest point.)

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    What is a Dune?

    by yooperprof Written Mar 1, 2003
    Significant wind-blown material

    Favorite thing: The Columbia Encyclopedia says "DUNE = a mound or ridge of wind-blown material, usually sand, formed in arid regions. . . Often a dune begins to form because material is deposited by the wind as it encounters a bush, a rock, or an irregular ground surface; others form against cliffs, hills, man-made walls or buildings, or other barriers. Those that are not restrained by fixed barriers have a tendency to migrate, driven by the prevailing wind. . . In the United States, great dunes are found in the Greak Lakes region, especially on the eastern shore of Lake Michigan."

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    What is Sand?

    by yooperprof Written Mar 1, 2003
    heaps and heaps of silica

    Favorite thing: The Columbia Encyclopedia says that "Sand = rock material occuring in the form of loose, rounded, or angular grains, varying in size from 1/16th mm to 2 mm in diameter, the particles being smaller than those of gravel, and larger than those of silt or clay. A secondary rock, sand is formed as a result of weathering and decomposition of igneous, sedimentary, or metamorphic rocks. Its most abundant mineral constituent is silica, usually in the form of quartz, and many sand deposits are almost exclusively of quartz grains."

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Glen Arbor Favorites

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