Fun things to do in Michigan

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Michigan

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    Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village

    by janetanne Written Aug 2, 2005

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    Henry Ford first preserved an entire building with the restoration of his beloved birthplace in 1919. When a new road forced the clapboard house from its original location, Ford decided not only to move it, but to restore and refurnish it to match his boyhood recollections.The restoration received so much press that Ford was inundated with requests to save other buildings. Soon after, the idea for Greenfield Village was born. I think going to Greenfield Village was one of the most interesting and fascinating places I have EVER been. There is so much history to SEE. Perhaps for me, one of the best places there, was the actual house and lab of Thomas Edison. You can see the actual lab..even with the original 'first' lightbulb Edison invented. If this is not enough, here are but some historical houses that can be seen in authentic early-American neighborhood settings, from humble early dwellings like the 1650s Plympton House and 1750s Daggett Farmhouse, to the 1840s Susquehanna Plantation and the 1930s Mattox House:
    Former President Adams Family Home
    Edison Homestead

    George Washington Carver Cabin
    Hermitage Slave Quarters
    Luther Burbank Garden Office
    Mattox Family Home
    Noah Webster Home
    Plympton Family Home
    Robert Frost Home
    Wiliam Holmes McGuffey Birthplace
    William Holmes McGuffey School

    George Washington Carver Cabin
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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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    Cross the Big Mac...

    by janetanne Updated Aug 2, 2005

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    ...The Big Mackinac Bridge that is!
    When the Bridge was built, it was the longest single span suspension bridge in the world. It still holds one in awe and is a must if you travel from the lower to the upper peninsula of Michigan. On Labor Day, you can also join thousands of people who walk across the 5 mile span! Here are just a few of the statistics of the bridge that can be found on the official Mackinac Bridge web page:
    Total Length of Bridge (5 Miles)
    26,372 Ft.

    Total Length of Steel Superstructure
    19,243 Ft.

    Length of Suspension Bridge (including Anchorages)
    8,614 Ft.

    Total Length of North Approach
    7,129 Ft.

    Length of Main Span (between Main Towers)
    3,800 Ft.

    Sails Set High Below Big Mac
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    • Architecture
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    Call of the Wild Museum, Gaylord, Michigan

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Apr 17, 2004

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    Call of the Wild is a small privately owned museum which features 60 exhibits of wildlife in their native habitat. The emphasis is on animals of the northern latitudes. There are bobcats, wolves, an eleven foot standing Polar Bear, and much more. The displays may not be quite as professionally done as in some larger museums, but we still found them interesting.

    There is also a Wildlife Theatre, and interactive exhibits which are fun and educational. For all of our fellow "chocoholics," the gift shop offers 36 varieties of homemade fudge, as well as clothing, jewelry, souvenirs, etc.

    The Call of the Wild Museum is open year round. Admission is $6.00 for adults and $4.00 for children.

    Us at Call of the Wild in January

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    Lower Taquamenon Falls

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Mar 1, 2004

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    Four miles downstream from the upper falls, The Lower Taquemenon Falls is less dramatic than the upper falls but just as beautiful in it's own way. It is actually a series of interesting cataracts where the river divides, forming an island. Rowboat rentals are available for crossing the river to explore the falls from the island.

    Lower Taquamenon Falls
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    • Camping
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Old Mackinac Point Lighthouse

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Mar 10, 2004

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    Established in 1892 but now inactive as a lighthouse, this old castle like structure is today a maritime museum, operated by the Mackinac Island State Park Commission. It is also the proposed site for a national lighthouse museum. The lighthouse is the focal point of an expansive green waterfront park area, which offers fabulous views of the Mackinac Bridge.

    Old Mackinac Point Lighthouse
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    • National/State Park
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    Take a Ride Through the Locks

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Apr 8, 2004

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    The Soo Locks are not only the top attraction in Sault Ste. Marie, but also one of the top for the entire state of Michigan. They are the largest waterway traffic system on earth. On any pretty day there will be scores of people standing along the sides watching some of the world's biggest freighters pass through. But the best way to experience the locks is to take the trip yourself and let the other tourists watch you. Your trip will take you into both American and Canadian waters. Besides the locks you will get fantastic views of Michigan's oldest city, as well as it's larger Canadian counterpart.

    Karen going through the Canadian side of the locks
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    • Cruise
    • Sailing and Boating

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    Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Mar 16, 2004

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    This is without doubt one of the best maritime and lighthouse museums on the Great Lakes. We enjoyed the video presentation and numerous artifacts and exhibits. Imaginative visitors can relive the last moments of the legendary Edmund Fitzgerald and many other ill fated vessels claimed forever by the Great Lakes. Among the displays is the actual bell of "Big Fitz," which was removed from the wreck and restored in 1995.

    The museum is in the old keepers residence and includes a very nice gift shop.

    Karen Outside the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum
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    • Sailing and Boating
    • Historical Travel

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    Sand Point Lighthouse

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Mar 18, 2004

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    This pretty little one and a half story lighthouse seems to have been built backwards, its tower facing the town instead of the water. Established in 1868, and inactive since 1939, the completely restored structure now serves as a museum operated by the Delta County Historical Society. The museum highlights the life of Mary Terry, the first light keeper who served for 18 years. She was one of the first female light keepers on the Great Lakes.

    The lighthouse and museum are open June 1 - Sept. 1 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and in Sept. from 1-4 p.m.

    Sand Point Light House
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    Upper Peninsula - Tahquamenon Falls

    by ant1606 Updated May 7, 2007

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    Springtime waterflow volume makes the Tahquamenon Falls spectacular. Their reddish color is due to tannins and other minerals which, shaken by the turbulence, form a natural foam downriver.
    Located in the relevant State Park, the much more dramatic Upper Falls can be reached through a 2-mile hike from the Lower Falls or a 5-minute walk from a parking lot.

    Upper Tahquamenon Falls Upper Tahquamenon Falls Upper Tahquamenon Falls Lower Tahquamenon Falls
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    • National/State Park

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    Menominee North Pier Lighthouse

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Mar 18, 2004

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    The Menominee North Pier Lighthouse was established in 1877, and the current structure built of cast iron in 1927. This bright red, octagonal tower, once attached to a fog signal building, is at the mouth of the Menominee River where it empties into Green Bay on Lake Superior. The lighthouse itself is 34 feet tall, but built on a concrete platform which gives it a 46 foot focal plane. Although less dramatic as many Great Lakes lighthouse, we still found it a very interesting place to visit. On the walk out along the pier we enjoyed viewing the birds and the boats on a beautiful summer Saturday afternoon.

    Menominee North Pier Lighthouse
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    • Historical Travel
    • Beaches
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    Sturgeon Point Lighthouse

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Mar 16, 2004

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    Just four miles north of Harrisville we discovered this picture perfect lighthouse, built in 1870. The conical brick tower, 68 feet tall, is one of the few on the Great Lakes that a visitor can climb and so should not be missed. On the station grounds sits a big rudder salvaged from the wooden steamer Marine City, which burned just off Sturgeon Point in 1880.

    A terrific little maritime museum is in the old keeper's house, and a gift shop is in a building in the rear. The site is owned and operated by the Alcona County Historical Society.

    Stephen at the Sturgeon Point Lighthouse
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    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Beaches

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    Pointe Aux Barques Lighthouse

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Mar 20, 2004

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    This 89-feet-tall conical brick tower is located in the very well kept Lighthouse Park, operated by Huron County. It is at a strategic headland near the spot where Saginaw Bay opens into Lake Huron. French traders called the place Pointe Aux Barques, "Point of Little Boats, " because of the many canoes that once gathered here during fur-trading season. The light was established in 1847 and the current structure built in 1857.

    The light is active and visitors cannot climb to the top of the tower. However, there is a gift shop and small museum which is open weekends from noon to 4 p.m., Memorial Day through Labor Day. After touring the museum and taking pictures, Karen and I enjoyed peanut butter and jelly sandwiches in the spacious grassy lakefront picnic area. Lighthouse Park also has a rustic campground, right at the base of the light. Some campers who have stayed here report being visited in the night by the pleasant ghost of a young lady who is said to reside at the light.

    Pointe Aux Barques Lighthouse
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    UP - See the fort on Mackinac Island

    by dlandt Written Jul 28, 2006

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    For the paltry fee of $9 you can go inside the fort on Mackinac. (Please note all my photos are taken from the outside) They have people dressed up as colonial era soldiers and wenches that guide you around and brief you on the history of the island and fort. The fort is really strategically located, commanding the heights overlooking the joining of Lakes Michigan and Huron and thus the shipping on the Great Lakes, the key to regional hegemony.

    From the town park From the back side From near the main entrance From the corner From below
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
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    • Castles and Palaces

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    Whitefish Point Lighthouse

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated May 1, 2004

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    A critical place for lake mariners, Whitefish Point is the turning point for vessel traffic in and out of Lake Superior. It is also the only shelter within 75 miles on this treacherous stretch of the largest freshwater lake in the world. Many a ship has struggled to reach the point, and some have never made the distance to find shelter. Perhaps the most famous of these was the Edmund Fitzgerald The enormous ship, longer than two football fields, disappeared, along with twenty-nine crewmen a few miles north of the point. The sinking of "Big Fitz" gave rise to a legend and a popular ballad by Gordon Lightfoot. Ironically, the light was out of service that night because a storm had cut the power supply to the station.

    This iron-skeletal structure dates back to shortly before the Civil War. The light atop the 80-foot tower has been automated since 1970. The station also serves as home to the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum.

    Whitefish Point Lighthouse
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    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

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    One of the most interseting...

    by ferdnbean Written Feb 25, 2003

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    One of the most interseting places I have ever been to was Mackinac Island, which is almost smack dab in between Lake Michigan and Lake Huron, in the straits of Mackinac. Despite it's spelling, Mackinac is pronounced Makinaw, like the town at the northernmost tip of Michigan before you cross over the Mackinac Bridge( quite a long, scenic bridge if you are into bridges, other than Lloyd, Jeff and Beau).
    Take the ferry over to Mackinac Island from either Mackinaw City or from the upper peninsula of Michigan from St. Ignace ( I think thats ythe name of the town). Plan to spend an entire day, and if at all possible, stay overnight. This will FORCE you to take things a little more leisurely and relaxed.

    Related to:
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Michigan Things to Do

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