Fun things to do in Mississippi

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Mississippi

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    Crafts Center

    by Small_World Written Feb 17, 2005

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    This log cabin is the first stop on the Natchez Trace north of Jackson once you take the exit from I-55. Inside the store (open 8-5 most days) are hand-woven baskets and beautiful pottery made by native Choctaw Indians and other local artisans.

    It's a great place to picnic or "powder your nose" (however, the bathrooms are rather rustic), but don't expect to find food here or anywhere else on the Trace. There's only one gas station on the entire route, and that is about 90 miles farther up the road.

    Crafts Center
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    Springfield Plantation

    by tompt Updated Nov 24, 2003

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    A working plantation for over 200 years, the house was begun in 1789 by wealthy Virginia planter Thomas Marston Green Jr.

    Andrew Jackson and Rachel Robards were married at the plantation in 1791.

    You can visit the inside of the house, a selfguided tour is available. The furnishing is not from the very beginning but a later period.

    To our surprise we found several pictures of our dutch royal family there.

    Springfield Plantation

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    Windsor ruins

    by tompt Written Nov 24, 2003

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    Near Port Gibson you can find the ruins of what once was one of the largest and finest antebellum houses in Mississippi. Twenty-three monolithic columns are all that remain.
    It was called Windsor and was the home of Smith Coffee Daniell II, a wealthy planter. It was built between 1859-1861.
    The houses costed $175,000 back then.
    It survived the civil war but was destroyed by fire in 1890 when a party guest threw a lit cigarette into a waste basket.

    The site is administered by the Mississippi Department of Archives and History.
    Entrance is free.

    Windsor ruins

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    Natchez Trace Parkway

    by tompt Written Nov 24, 2003

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    The Natchez Trace is an historical path. It started of as a series of hunter paths by the indian tribes living here. Around 1733 the french made a map of the area showing an indian trail from Natchez to the northeast.
    By the end of the 1700's Ohio River farmers began to float down the river to sell their crops and products in Natchez or New Orleans. As they sold their flatboats for lumber they had to go back overland. By 1810 the trail had become an important wilderness road. Many stands (inns) were in operation along the trace, most providing basic food and shelter. The road was dangerous though, thieves, swamps, floods, insects carrying disseases.......
    In 1812 the steamer New Orleans arrived in Natchez. And people preferred the comfort of travelling at the steamers along the river over the road.
    The trace became abandonned untill in the late 1930's the Parkway was started. Now it is complete for 95% of the route between Natchez, MS and Nashville, TN.

    More pictures and stories in our travelogues.

    Natchez Trace Parkway

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    Mile 260 - Oren Dunn Museum

    by calcaf38 Written Aug 13, 2010

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    This is not officially related to the Parkway, but it made a fitting exit for me in Tupelo.

    This is another of those poky but charming museums of Southern rural life, with an old schoolroom, and old dairy, an old trolley... Nothing earth shattering, but a pleasant visit. I'm sure that during the school year, it must be packed with field-trippers.

    Oh, and in the back room, there is an oddly somber War Memorabilia section, with Nazi collectibles. Hmmm...

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    Natchez

    by tompt Written Nov 24, 2003

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    Do visit Natchez, an entire city full of historic atebellum homes. The rich plantation owners spend the wet period, when the river flooded in Natchez. Most of them built big houses to show of their wealth.

    First visit the Natchez visitor center where you can get all the info you need to enjoy this beautifull city.

    NAtchez information center

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    Ante-bellum homes

    by shdw100 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This is the inside of one of the many Civil War plantation homes that you can visit while in Natchez, MS. Many of the original relics and artifacts are original to the homes, which helps to create a sense of what it must have been like living there. To obtain a map of the homes in Natchez, go to the Natchez Convention and Visitors Bureau for information.

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    Pre-Civil War Plantation homes

    by shdw100 Written Oct 23, 2002

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    This is one of several pre-Civil War antebellum homes in Natches, Mississippi. You can take tours of many of the homes. This one, although it looks finished on the outside, the only part of the inside that is complete is the basement. The Civil War prevented the home from being finished.

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    Mile 193.1 - Jeff Busby

    by calcaf38 Updated Aug 13, 2010

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    Mississippi is not a land of expansive vistas, so this is special. A pleasant hike brings you to the highest point on the Trace, all of 603 feet! This is also a picnic area and campground.

    (On February 15, 1934, while serving as U.S. Congressman from Mississippi, Thomas Jefferson Busby introduced a bill authorizing a survey of the Old Natchez Trace. Four years later, the historic road was designated a unit of the National Park System. This area is named in Jeff Busby's honor to commemorate his part in the Parkway's establishment.)

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    Mile 15.5 - Mount Locust Inn and Plantation

    by calcaf38 Updated Aug 12, 2010

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    This is a well restored inn, and also a visitor center, where you can pick up the indispensable map of the Natchez Trace Parkway. Mount Locust is actually one of the oldest structures in the state, and it is the only remaining inn, out of many that used to stand along the path.It is very interesting to see what sort of building, kitchen, and bed awaited the travelers.

    I wonder if a long-distance wayfarer in 1810 would have entered Mount Locust with the same resignation I experienced in all the musty, dark and drab motels I stayed in during this trip.

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    Mile 41.5 - Sunken Trace

    by calcaf38 Updated Aug 13, 2010

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    This is a haunting segment of the original road. Imagine how many steps it took to give the path this distinctive curve. Many of the typical Natchez Trace photos are taken at this spot.

    Unfortunately, it is a very short hike, a matter of a few minutes. I heard rumors that there exist long segments of the original trace, but they are unadvertised.

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    Mile 54.8 - Rocky Springs

    by calcaf38 Updated Aug 13, 2010

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    This one might as well be a hoax. The markers indicate that a thriving little town of 2000+ once stood here, which fell victim of erosion, yellow fever, and the boll weevil (take you pick, I guess).

    Says who? There is nothing there except... two old safes!

    However, there is a good section of the original road nearby, so it is definitely worth a stop.

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    Mile 122 - Cypress Swamp

    by calcaf38 Updated Aug 13, 2010

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    This was the one spot that made me want to travel the Natchez Trace Pathway in the first place.

    You know that pull you experience while staring into Niagara Falls... I had that same pull here. I started fantasizing walking into the slime, with bricks in my pockets: half Virginia Woolf, half Creature from the Black Lagoon.

    If you love swamps - and who wouldn't - this is just wonderful.

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    Mile 180.7 - French Camp

    by calcaf38 Written Aug 13, 2010

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    An old sorghum farm and several related buildings are the occasion for a pleasant walk. Even if the little museums are closed - as they were on this late Summer evening - this is a nice stroll. Nearby is a Christian Academy for boys.

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    Vicksburg National Military Park

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Dec 7, 2004

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    Vicksburg National Military Park was established Feb. 21, 1899, to commemorate one of the largest and most decisive battles of the Civil War: the campaign, siege and defense of the southern Mississipi River city of Vicksburg. There are a staggering 1,325 historical markers and monuments in the Park and 144 cannons, as well as 20 miles of reconstructed trenches. A 16 mile tour road winds through the battlefield with many interpretative stops along the way.

    There is also a visitor's center complete with films, bookstore, and museum. Visitors will also want to see the restored Union gunboat USS Cairo, and the Vicksburg National Cemetary.

    History buffs can spend days here. It is a great place to take a long hike in beautiful green surroundings, especially in cool weather. Summers here are very hot and humid.

    Hours:
    Open year 'round
    8:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M.
    Closed Christmas Day

    The Illinois Monument at the Vicksburg NMP
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