George Washington Carver National Monument Things to Do

  • Courtesy of the National Park Serivce
    Courtesy of the National Park Serivce
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  • The Visitor Center
    The Visitor Center
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  • Exhibits in the Visitor Center
    Exhibits in the Visitor Center
    by Stephen-KarenConn

Most Recent Things to Do in George Washington Carver National Monument

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    Boy Carver Statue

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Boy Carver Statue
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    Along the Carver Trail, beside the Carver Branch, you will see the Boy Carver Statue. It was sculpted in 1960 by Robert Amendola. The statue is in a wooded natural area much like the ones young George loved to explore, and where he developed his insatiable curiosity which propelled his remarkable career. This well known statue is one of the most photographed spots in the park.

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    Missouri Tallgrass Prairie

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Tallgrass Pairie and Woodlands

    In addiition to the historical aspects of George Washington Carver National Monument, there are also opportunities for nature study and enjoying the out-of-doors. A portion of the site is wooded, with a pond and streams, and the rest of the 210 acre site preserves one of the few remaining places a person can see native tallgrass prairie in southwestern Missouri. During my summer visit I enjoyed observing the wildflowers, grasshoppers and butterflies that were present.

    The nearby Diamond Grove Preserve has 570 acres of prairie on cherty soil in Southwest Missouri with a rich display of spring flowers. It is west of Diamond Grove and is maintained by the Missouri Department of Conservation.

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    Visitor Center

    by Toughluck Written Oct 19, 2007
    Courtesy of the National Park Serivce

    The young boy known as the “Plant Doctor,” tended his secret garden while observing the day to day operations of a successful 19th century farm. Nature and nurture ultimately influenced George on his journey to becoming a renowned scientist of agriculture.

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    Carver Cemetery

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jan 4, 2006

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    The Carver Cemetery
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    Moses and Susan Carver are buried here at the Carver Cemetery, along with other family members and neighbors. George Washington Carver died at Tuskegee, Alabama on January 5, 1943, and was interred there. That July, the United States Congress designated George Washington Carver National Monument, the first park to honor an African American scientist, educator, and humanitarian.

    How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving, and tolerant of the weak and the strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these."
    --George Washington Carver

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    The Jesup Agricultural Wagon

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jan 4, 2006

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    The Jesup Agricultural Wagon
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    As a professor at Tuckagee Institute in Alabama, Carver had his students build this horse drawn wagon for the purpose of taking their knowledge to the people who needed it. This agricultural station on wheels was named for Morris K. Jesup, a New York businessman who helped finance Carver's work. The wagon was a "moveable school," used to carry agricultural exhibits to county fairs and other community gatherings.

    The horse drawn wagon was later replaced by a motorized truck, still called the Jesup Wagon. By the 1930s it carried a nurse, a home demonstration agent, an agricultural agent, and an architect to share the latest techniques with rural people of the South.

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    The Moses & Susan Carver House

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jan 1, 2006

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    The Moses & Susan Carver House
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    This house was built by Moses and Susan Carver in 1881. George Washington Carver did not live here, but he visited occasionally when he came "home" to Missouri. The house is open for viewing, along with interesting interpretive exhibits . The split rail fence which defines the yard and the surrounding shade trees make for an idylic setting. A garden behind the house is planted as it would have been when the Carvers lived there.

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    Williams Pond

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jan 1, 2006

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    William's Pond
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    Williams Pond, built in the 1930s, is named for Sarah Jane Williams, Moses Carver's niece, whose family lived on Carver's farm. It is in a pretty sylvan setting and is encircled by the quarter-mile Contemplative Loop Trail, a spur off the Carver Trail. There are a few benches along the route, and plaques with inspiriational quotations from George Washington Carver. Williams Branch flows from the spring-fed pond.

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    Carver Birthplace Site

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jan 1, 2006

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    The Carver Birthplace Site

    This outline of the foundation marks the spot where George Washington Carver was born in 1864, in the last days of the War Between the States. It was a small one room log cabin, a part of the slave quarters on the Carver farm. This is one of the first sights you will see along the Carver Trail, a short distance from the Visitor Center.

    One of the interesting exhibits in the Visitor Center is the Bill of Sale for George's mother, Mary/ The 13-year-old negro was sold for $700 in 1855. Mary and infant George were kidnapped during the turmoil of the war. George was later located in Arkansas and returned to the Carvers, orphaned and nearly dead from whooping cough. His mother was never found. George did not know the identity of his father, but suspected he was a slave on a nearby farm. Carver demonstrated with his life that a person can overcome difficult circumstances and an unpromising beginning to achieve greatness and honor.

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    The Carver Trail

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jan 1, 2006

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    The Carver Trail
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    The only way to fully see and enjoy the George Washington Carver National Monument is to take a walk along the 3/4 mile Carver Trail. Along the route of this accessible trail you will see the Carver birthplace site, Carver Spring, Boy Carver Satue, Williams Pond, Moses Carver House Carver Cemetery, Tallgrass Prairie restoration area and more. The winding path leads through woods and fields, makes three creek crossings over footbridges, and skirts a beautiful woodland pond. All along the way you will see plaques which give insightful and inspiring quotes from George Washington Carver. Walking the trail and reading the markers is a truly inspiring experiene.

    A 1/4-mile-long side trail, the Contemplative Loop Trail, circles Williams Pond, and makes a one-mile hike possible by combining the two loops.

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    The Carver Bust

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jan 1, 2006

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    The Carver Bust
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    Just outside the Visitor Center is located the Carver Bust, gold colored and sitting atop a small brick pedestal.

    During his life George Washington Carver mastered chemistry, botany, mycology (study of fungi), music, herbalism, art, cooking and massage. Because of his encyclopedic knowledge of plant properties he was sought out by such great men as Thomas Edison and Henry Ford, who desired to learn from him concerning the industrial use of plants - especially peanuts and soybeans. He discovered more than 300 uses of the lowly peanut, including the invention of peanut butter.

    In spite of his acclaim, Caver remained a humble man whose love of God and agriculture became a ministry to benefit all of mankind. He was viewed by both blacks and whites as a symbol of racial understanding.

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    The Visitor Center

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jan 1, 2006

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    The Visitor Center
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    The modern Visitor Center is the place to begin any visit to the George Washington Carver National Mounument. Here you will find informative and educational exhibits, a film and a sales area with publications about Carver and his work. The park and visitor center are open every day of the week except for Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's Day. Admission is free. Be sure to pick up a brochure which will give you a map of the Carver Trail which will take you by all of the points of interest in the park.

    At the Visitor Center you will also find the Carver Discovery Center. Children and adults alike will enjoy the interactive exhibits about nature and science.

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    We missed...

    by basstbn Written Aug 13, 2004

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    There is also a Carver Discovery Center featuring interactive exhibits about nature and science. We thought that would be geared mainly for children, so opted to spend more time elsewhere. Have heard it is nice, however, for youngsters.

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    Carver Cemetery

    by basstbn Written Aug 13, 2004

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    Resting place of Moses and Susan Carver

    Many of the family of Moses and Susan Carver are buried in this cemetery in the meadow, a tallgrass prairie restoration area with abundant wildflowers.

    George Washington Carver is buried at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, where lived, taught, and carried on his research for decades.

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    Moses and Susan Carver House

    by basstbn Written Aug 13, 2004

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    The Carvers built this house in 1881. George visited here occasionally, but never actually lived here. The house was not open for tours on the day of our visit, and from the outside we could not see much furniture inside, so perhaps it is not open to the public at all.

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    Williams Pond

    by basstbn Written Aug 13, 2004

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    Williams Pond

    Man-made pond built in the 1930s is named for Sarah Jane Williams, Moses Carver's niece, whose family live on Carver's farm. It is encircled by Contemplative Loop Trail with a number of park benches from which one can rest, meditate, or just admire the view.

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