George Washington Carver National Monument Travel Guide

  • Visitors Center
    Visitors Center
    by Basaic
  • Diorama
    Diorama
    by Basaic
  • Carver as a boy
    Carver as a boy
    by Basaic

George Washington Carver National Monument Things to Do

  • Boy Carver Statue

    Along the Carver Trail, beside the Carver Branch, you will see the Boy Carver Statue. It was sculpted in 1960 by Robert Amendola. The statue is in a wooded natural area much like the ones young George loved to explore, and where he developed his insatiable curiosity which propelled his remarkable career. This well known statue is one of the most...

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  • Missouri Tallgrass Prairie

    In addiition to the historical aspects of George Washington Carver National Monument, there are also opportunities for nature study and enjoying the out-of-doors. A portion of the site is wooded, with a pond and streams, and the rest of the 210 acre site preserves one of the few remaining places a person can see native tallgrass prairie in...

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  • Visitor Center

    The young boy known as the “Plant Doctor,” tended his secret garden while observing the day to day operations of a successful 19th century farm. Nature and nurture ultimately influenced George on his journey to becoming a renowned scientist of agriculture.

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  • Carver Cemetery

    Moses and Susan Carver are buried here at the Carver Cemetery, along with other family members and neighbors. George Washington Carver died at Tuskegee, Alabama on January 5, 1943, and was interred there. That July, the United States Congress designated George Washington Carver National Monument, the first park to honor an African American...

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  • The Jesup Agricultural Wagon

    As a professor at Tuckagee Institute in Alabama, Carver had his students build this horse drawn wagon for the purpose of taking their knowledge to the people who needed it. This agricultural station on wheels was named for Morris K. Jesup, a New York businessman who helped finance Carver's work. The wagon was a "moveable school," used to carry...

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  • The Moses & Susan Carver House

    This house was built by Moses and Susan Carver in 1881. George Washington Carver did not live here, but he visited occasionally when he came "home" to Missouri. The house is open for viewing, along with interesting interpretive exhibits . The split rail fence which defines the yard and the surrounding shade trees make for an idylic setting. A...

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  • Williams Pond

    Williams Pond, built in the 1930s, is named for Sarah Jane Williams, Moses Carver's niece, whose family lived on Carver's farm. It is in a pretty sylvan setting and is encircled by the quarter-mile Contemplative Loop Trail, a spur off the Carver Trail. There are a few benches along the route, and plaques with inspiriational quotations from George...

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  • Carver Birthplace Site

    This outline of the foundation marks the spot where George Washington Carver was born in 1864, in the last days of the War Between the States. It was a small one room log cabin, a part of the slave quarters on the Carver farm. This is one of the first sights you will see along the Carver Trail, a short distance from the Visitor Center.One of the...

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  • The Carver Trail

    The only way to fully see and enjoy the George Washington Carver National Monument is to take a walk along the 3/4 mile Carver Trail. Along the route of this accessible trail you will see the Carver birthplace site, Carver Spring, Boy Carver Satue, Williams Pond, Moses Carver House Carver Cemetery, Tallgrass Prairie restoration area and more. The...

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  • The Carver Bust

    Just outside the Visitor Center is located the Carver Bust, gold colored and sitting atop a small brick pedestal. During his life George Washington Carver mastered chemistry, botany, mycology (study of fungi), music, herbalism, art, cooking and massage. Because of his encyclopedic knowledge of plant properties he was sought out by such great men as...

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  • The Visitor Center

    The modern Visitor Center is the place to begin any visit to the George Washington Carver National Mounument. Here you will find informative and educational exhibits, a film and a sales area with publications about Carver and his work. The park and visitor center are open every day of the week except for Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's Day....

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  • We missed...

    There is also a Carver Discovery Center featuring interactive exhibits about nature and science. We thought that would be geared mainly for children, so opted to spend more time elsewhere. Have heard it is nice, however, for youngsters.

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  • Carver Cemetery

    Many of the family of Moses and Susan Carver are buried in this cemetery in the meadow, a tallgrass prairie restoration area with abundant wildflowers.George Washington Carver is buried at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, where lived, taught, and carried on his research for decades.

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  • Moses and Susan Carver House

    The Carvers built this house in 1881. George visited here occasionally, but never actually lived here. The house was not open for tours on the day of our visit, and from the outside we could not see much furniture inside, so perhaps it is not open to the public at all.

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  • Williams Pond

    Man-made pond built in the 1930s is named for Sarah Jane Williams, Moses Carver's niece, whose family live on Carver's farm. It is encircled by Contemplative Loop Trail with a number of park benches from which one can rest, meditate, or just admire the view.

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  • The Carver Trail

    The well-maintained Carver Trail winds through the woods past Carver Spring, the Boy Carver Statue, Williams Pond, Moses and Susan Carver's cabin and the family cemetary. Pause to read the meditative plaques along the way, all quotations from the life of George Washington Carver. Very uplifting, indeed.

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  • Boy Carver Statue

    Day after day, young George explored the woods, collecting and studying the flowers, sparking his life-long love of nature and dedication to serving man with his knowledge of plants. At the same time, as George would say later in life, ... "I was practically overwhelmed with the sense of some Great Presence.. Never since have I been without this...

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  • Birthplace Site

    George was born in a cabin on this site on the edge of a clearing next to the woods. He was sickly as a child, never knew his father, and with his mother Mary was kidnapped by outlaws. George was found in Arkansas suffering from whooping cough and returned to the farm, but his mother had disappeared forever. Moses and Susan Carver adopted the lad.

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