Hannibal Favorites

  • Favorites
    by atufft
  • Hill St.
    Hill St.
    by dlandt
  • Tom & Huck
    Tom & Huck
    by dlandt

Most Recent Favorites in Hannibal

  • atufft's Profile Photo

    Why is Mark Twain so important?

    by atufft Updated Aug 27, 2010

    Favorite thing: Visitors to Hannibal learn quickly that Mark Twain (whose actual name was Samuel Clemens) is not just another famous American author. He's THE giant of American literature which in fact includes a long list of authors alive and dead who allude to Twain's work in their own great novels. Since I taught English literature at the high school and college level, I understand well why Twain deserves this status. Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man, Alice Walker's The Color Purple, Joseph Heller's Catch-22, are just three modern American masterpieces that owe a lot to Mark Twain.

    Basically, for those who are American and uninformed, or foreign and curious, Mark Twain is at first the most authentic American author writing in the American dialect, and so is the rough equivalent of England's Shakespeare, Spain's Cervantes, Russia's Pushkin, France's Dumas, Italy's Dante, and so on.

    Twain was first a newspaper reporter and short story comic. His adventures of Tom Sawyer, and countless western and travel stories are thick with social and political wit.

    More importantly, Twain followed the example of the great Cervantes by adapting the picaresque novel, a theme of self-discovery among rogue companions, by travel in America's heartland. Like Don Quixote, Twains' characters amuse the audience as they stumble into chance but profound discovery of themselves and society.

    In Huckleberry Finn, a 10 year old white boy runs away from home, collaborates and "protects" black Jim, who is also seeking freedom from brutality of slavery. In chapter after chapter, Twain studies a variety of social ills, while Huckleberry Finn earns his manhood through protecting a man marked by society. Meanwhile, it is actually subservient black Jim who navigates the raft on the turbulent Mississippi, seemingly wrong direction--south and toward New Orleans, the slave auction capital. By facing many risks, Jim earns his freedom in the most meaningful way, until ironically news arrives that his master had written a will to set him free.

    Thus, Twain's use of authentic American vernacular for the adventure down America's greatest waterway--the Mississippi, results in a brilliant analysis of America's deepest political controversy--slavery and racism. Copies of Twain's works are available for free on-line. To get most out of reading Huckleberry Finn, the modern reader is advised to read slowly and to take advantage the wealth of critical explanations, chapter by chapter, also available on-line. One hundred years out, Twain's works are not easy reading, but they are well worth the effort.

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  • dlandt's Profile Photo

    The foot of Hill St.

    by dlandt Updated Feb 9, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hill St.

    Favorite thing: Down in this area they've made an attempt to preserve some of the things Mark Twain wrote about like the whitewashed fence and Becky Thatcher's house. Its pretty picturesque but there's too much in the way of souvenier shops and the like. I would walk through here, but not spend any money.

    Fondest memory: The thing I liked most about the foot of Hill St., was that enough of the buildings were preserved or recreated that you could actually get a feel for how the town might have looked in Mark Twain's day.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

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  • dlandt's Profile Photo

    Tom & Huck Statue and Lighthouse

    by dlandt Updated Feb 9, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tom & Huck

    Favorite thing: At the foot of Cardiff Hill there is a statue of Tom and Huck. Climbing the Hill takes you to the lighthouse, which, when I visited, was roped off for construction. You can read the sign in the picture.

    Fondest memory: The views are nice, and the grounds are well enough tended and manicured that even the elderly or mildly disabled should have no trouble getting up the hill. That said, this is, in essence, just a hill, albeit one made famous by Mark Twain.

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