Saint Louis Favorites

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Most Recent Favorites in Saint Louis

  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Old St. Louis Union Station

    by SLLiew Updated Jan 30, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: This beautiful building located at Market Street was a very busy train station but is now converted into a shopping, restaurant, entertainment and a major hotel.

    Worth spending an hour or two to explore.

    Location: Market Street. Betwen18th Street and 20th Steet, St. Louis Downtown.

    Website: http://www.stlouisunionstation.com/

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  • senoritamc's Profile Photo

    Explore Downtown

    by senoritamc Written Aug 7, 2006

    Favorite thing: The culture. It is a melting pot of cultures. You see it in the streets, the shops, and the restaurants.

    Fondest memory: Christmas in Downtown St. Louis. I remember one particular Christmas, I must of been 4 or 5, when mom bundled me up in a new fancy warm purple coat and boots and cap to match. Mom and dad took me downtown to window shop and look at all the new movable Christmas displays. I remember admiring all the street Christmas lights and displays. How even the street lights had decorations on them. Oh how many times mom and dad would lift me up, mom had one arm and dad the other, and they would lift me up to keep me from having to step up the curb. I remember bringing home all kinds of little toys, especially from Walgreens. Toys like metal wind up airplanes and those big wood puzzles that smelled like real wood and those GREAT BIG COLORING BOOKS.

    Downtown Follow the red to the Stadium Forest Park 1st trip to the new stadium Money for college
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Architecture

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  • webster groves,a beautiful place to visit

    by signaigo Written Apr 22, 2006

    Favorite thing: i love everything about st.louis, and what i like most, is my home town of webster groves. i would recomend to anyone that was thinking of moving to st. louie to check out webster groves as the place to live. i grew up there and have the best memories a person could want. the homes are so full of character, the people are wonderful on the average, the neighborhoods can be downright picturesque, and it is a great place to raise kids and have them grow up. i am forty five years old and live in california. as i am writing this letter, i am wearing a ' webster groves statesmen ' highschool shirt. that's what i think about that town.

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  • LauraWest's Profile Photo

    April Is Perfect!

    by LauraWest Updated Jan 22, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: April is one of the Best Months to visit St. Louis!! But I'm in love with the season of Spring, so I'm certainly biased!! But Spring temperatures are so lovely and so are all the blooming trees and plants you see everywhere here! The heat & humidity of summer has not arrived yet, nor the insects.
    Stroll in the neighborhoods, the many parks...Soulard is lovely & romantic....

    This photo is of the magnolia tree in my backyard...so beautiful. You have to enlarge it with the "postcard" feature to really see the detail. This is how you can view the incredible blosssoms on this tree! Wow, right?!!

    Pink Magnolia Blooms
    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Budget Travel
    • School Holidays

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  • rgbjrcook's Profile Photo

    Stay Mid Town in the Central West End

    by rgbjrcook Updated Oct 3, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: If you stay at the Chase Park Plaza Hotel you can walk the Central West End and Forest Park, Take the metrolink to Downtown or Forest Park
    take the cab, car or the bus easily to The Hill, Clayton, the Botanical Garden or the Loop. Good restaurants to walk to, food stores, shopping within a short walk .Good jogging or blading in Forest Park, golf, tennis,outdoor Ice skating, outdoor theater. science center, zoo. museums.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits
    • Zoo

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  • Blatherwick's Profile Photo

    Missouri River

    by Blatherwick Written Sep 3, 2005

    Favorite thing: The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River. At about 2,565 mi (4,130 km) in length, it is the longest river in the United States and drains approximately one-sixth of the North American continent. The combined Missouri-Mississippi river system is the fourth longest river in the world.

    Much of what you want to see and do is along the river. The Archway is located there along with the downtown core. All along the river are "riverboat" casinos that don't actually go anywhere but pull up the plank every so often.

    As you can tell from the picture, the Missouri is prone to flooding. Before the recent disaster in Louisiana, the 1993 flood was considered the most costly and devastating flood to ravage the U.S. in modern history. The number of record river levels, its aerial extent, the number of persons displaced, amount of crop and property damage and its duration surpassed all earlier U.S. floods in modern times. The 52 foot St. Louis Flood wall, built to handle the volume of the 1844 flood, was able to keep the 1993 flood out with just over two feet to spare.

    Missouri River
    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism

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  • deecat's Profile Photo

    For Breathtaking Mosaics, Visit Cathedral Basilica

    by deecat Updated Jun 7, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: One very rainly afternoon, Jill and I took the MetroLink to the Forest Park stop, and then we walked to The Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis. Even under less than ideal circumstances, it was worth it all.

    What a glorious place. The architecture of the exterior is Romanesque with granite walls, two massive towers, and rose windows. The main dome is on an elevated drum that is pierced by Romanesque windows. It's the first roof that I've seen that is covered in brilliant green tiles which can be seen for miles.

    The architecture of the inside is of Byzantine tradition. It has soaring domes, soffits, pendentive, arches, and the lunettes are paved with incredible mosaics. The literature indicates that there are "83,000 square feet of mosaic art created by twenty artists and installed over a period of seventy-five years"

    These are Italian style mosaic mostly and were installed by either the Gorham Comapny or the Tiffany and Company.

    This Cathedral Basilica has the largest mosaic collection in the world, "created by 20 different artists and covering 83,000 square feet." Can you imagine 41.5 MILLION pieces of glass and 7,000 colors. This was started in 1912 and not completed until 1988. It is the reason the Cathedral is designated a Basilica. I thought that the Mosaics of Ravenna, Italy, were great, but this is spectacular.

    There is a Cathedral Shop on the west side of the vestibule that is open Mon.-Sunday from noon until 4 :00 pm. The proceeds are used for maintenance of the building.

    Fondest memory: When Jill and I arrived at theCathedral Basilica, Mass was in session, so we visited the Mosaics Museum located on the lower level. I would suggest to everyone to visit this museum FIRST.

    It shows the construction of the building and the creation and installation of its mosaics. In addition, the burial crypt of John Cardinal Glennon (he initiated the construction of the Cathedral) is located in this museum.

    It is open from 10:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m.

    The Cathedral Basilica of Saint  Louis
    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • deecat's Profile Photo

    Art of the Osage at Saint Louis Art Museum

    by deecat Updated Jun 7, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Thank goodness I saw a small article in the Chicago Tribuneabout the art of the Osage at the St. Louis Art Museum! Museum is free but this special exhibit cost $8.00 for seniors and $10.00 for others.

    This text was written by Jill Martin after we visited the Saint Louis Art Museum.

    The St. Louis Art Museum featured an exhibit on the Art of the Osage Indians. In this exhibit, "art" is meant as any artifact made by the Osage, for utility or decoration. Items were loaned from the Smithsonian and other museums, but much of the 20th century material came from a family of Osage artisans, one of whom was featured on an accompanying video.

    The exhibit offered audio headsets, with much background information provided by the curator and by Osage Indians. The audio was programed to correspond with numbers on signs so that the exhibit could be viewed in any order.

    Traditional glass cases contained several examples of an item, such as clothing, headdresses, quilts. A neutral background emphasized the brilliant colors of the objects.
    In the video, the current Principal Chief of the Osage nation told the history of their removal from the area of Kansas, Missouri and Arkansas to Osage and other counties in Oklahoma.

    He said the Osage kept title to the mineral rights of their land; so, when oil was discovered in the 1920's, they became rich. Unfortunately, they lost most of their money during the Depression. The original 20,000 declined to 1000, but today they have rebounded to 20,00 again.

    Fondest memory: The beautiful handwork of the women was shown, including quilts commemorating Osage soldiers in World War I and II.

    Other hand made items include "wedding jackets" with a history. Colonial soldiers gave Osage Indian chiefs military jackets. Too small for the men, the jackets were appropriated by women, and a tradition grew of using the jackets in place of wedding gowns. Osage women sewed and decorated new jackets; traditionalists still wear them today at their weddings.

    I found the story of their attempts to join modern society while retaining their historic attitudes very moving. The Native American churches of the Osage served as an example of their retention of their own values.

    Ticket from Osage Art Exhibit
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

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  • deecat's Profile Photo

    Tour the Missouri Botanical Garden

    by deecat Updated Jun 7, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: If weather permits, tour the Missouri Botanical Garden. The day we had scheduled to visit, it rained all day.

    Because we love nature so much, we were eager to see this famous Botanical Garden which is known throughout the nation as the best in the United States!

    The Missouri Botanical Garden opened in 1859 and has been designated as a National Historic Landmark.

    It covers 79 acres and is a center for botanical research, education, and horticultural display.
    This year because of the Lewis and Clark Expedition celebration, be sure to see an exhibit of plants encountered by Lewis and Clark.
    There are narrated tram Tours, a Garden Cafe, a Garden Gate Shop.
    Parking is FREE

    Fondest memory: Information needed:
    Open:
    9 a.m.-5 p.m. seven days a week
    (Closed Christmas)
    Memorial Day to Labor Day: Open Wednesday evenings until 9 p.m.
    Morning walking hours: Wed.-Sat. 7-9 a.m.

    Accessibility:
    Accessible to people of all abilities

    Location:
    Known as "an oasis in the city"
    4344 Shaw Boulevard
    A short drive southeast of Forest Park.

    Admission:
    $7.00 for ages 13-64
    $5 for age 65 and over
    St. Louis City/County Residents:
    $3 for ages 13-64
    $1.50 for age 65 and older
    FREE for members & children 12 & under

    SPECIAL ADMISSION CHARGE FOR SOME
    EVENTS

    Things to see:

    Climatron conservatory
    a geodesic dome greenhouse of tropical rain forest, waterfalls, and birds.

    Seiwa-en:
    An authentic 14 acre Japanese garden (The largest in North America)

    Kemper Center for Home Gardening:
    Nation's most comprehensive resource center for gardening information with 23 demonstration gardens over 8 acres.

    Victorian area:
    A formal Victorian-style garden with an observatory overlooking a maze of 8-foot hedges.

    Shoenberg Temperate House:
    A tiled Moorish garden, carnivorous plant bog, and "Plants of the Bible" area.

    In addition, there are areas for Roses, English Woodlands, and Orchids to name a few.

    I regret missing this outstanding Botanical Garden. Guess I will have to return to St. Louis.
    (Note: This is not my photograph. I scanned it from a brochure.)

    A brochure of the Missouri Botanical Garden
    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Birdwatching

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  • deecat's Profile Photo

    History Museum's Lewis & Clark Exhibition

    by deecat Updated Jun 7, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Note: This tip was written by Jill and Dee (Mostly Jill)

    The new Lewis & Clark Exhibition at the Missouri Historical Museum costs $12.00 and is worth it. This exhibition celebrates 200 years since the Lewis & Clark expedition.

    Outside the exhibit, the experience began as a staff member used a fur-covered box to demonstrate the Indians' skill at using materials in their environment, showing the use of buffalo sinew, porcupine guill, a feather, etc. After purchasing tickets, we viewed a video with background information to prepare us for the exhibit itself.

    Jill's impressions on the Special Exhibition of Lewis & Clark:
    Today's style of interactive material is very evident. Extremely thorough signs at the exhibit are supplemented by material given through earphones like those at the Art Museum which are computer regulated and easily used. Visitors had a choice in the order that they moved through the exhibit; thus, the crowd moved quite smoothly, not crowding at one spot. I was impressed by the quality of the background information given by the curator and other experts.

    Fondest memory: The Historical Society's exhibit had several interactive choices that were fun and challenging such as matching plants with descriptions and scents; playing a game to see how Clark communicated with Indians through many interpreters.

    When the visitor successfully matched the order of interpretation, he/she could listen to a message being transmitted in 4 languages (English, French, Shoshone, and Hidatsu). Another game let visitors match fur or paw prints with animals.

    The exhibit featured good signs that were visible in the low light. The signs told the owner of each artifact and also indicated which were reproductions. As a worker in a little museum, I was astonished at the artifacts gathered from many sources, including private collectors; though, many came from the Smithsonian and Harvard's Peabody Museum.

    I especially liked the thoroughness of attribution. For example, a beautiful tanned hide dress was thought to be Sacajawea's but not authenticated. It would have been tempting to just say that it was hers.

    The exhibit was thorough, but very visitor-friendly and understandable by children. I loved it all and have never seen a better presentation, and I am a museum-goer.

    Lewis & Clark Exhibit at Missouri History Museum
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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  • bhemak's Profile Photo

    St. Louis schools

    by bhemak Written Jan 20, 2005

    Favorite thing: I was told that to residents of St. Louis asking what school you go to is very important. It can tell you what neighborhood you came from, what kind of money your family has, and a level of your intelligence. It might also imply something about your race or relgion.

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  • Six Flags (Sucks)

    by teemroper Updated Sep 9, 2004

    Favorite thing: Saint Louis is great. The shopping, the people, The Cardinals are on a ROLL.

    Six Flags on the other hand you pay big dollars to get in ($35+) and then they want to charge yo ufor extra rides. I don't mind paying for the electronic wrist watch deal that hold syour place in line (great idea) but half the thrill ride yo uhave to pay extra to get on. The big rides are all inclusive but if it isn't the Rollcoasters or the Farris Whell, be prepaired to shell out more dough. JKR

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  • yooperprof's Profile Photo

    UC - Delmar Loop - Community Music School

    by yooperprof Written Jun 25, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The Community Music School is affiliated with Webster University and is home to musical events of all kinds throughout the year. It's located at the western end of the Delmar Loop in what was once a synagogue.

    Temple of Music
    Related to:
    • Music
    • Architecture

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  • yooperprof's Profile Photo

    University City - Delmar Loop - City Hall

    by yooperprof Written Jun 25, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The University City City Hall is at the western end of a section of Delmar Boulevard called by locals "the Delmar Loop". Back in streetcar days, this was "the end of the line" where the trams literally did "loop around" before heading back downtown. Well, the streetcars are long gone, but the name "the Delmar Loop" has stuck for this section of the city.

    University City is a separate city from St. Louis, incorporated in the late 19th century when the city of St. Louis fatefully "seceded" from the county of St. Louis and became it's own "independent" entity. Its name derives from its location smack dab on the north side of the campus of Washington University.

    I've called University City's City Hall "the R2 D2 building". Can you see why?

    Octagonal tower
    Related to:
    • Architecture

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  • yooperprof's Profile Photo

    Public Art - "Thinker on a Rock" at Wash U

    by yooperprof Updated Jun 25, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: A recent addition to the Hilltop campus at Washington U. is this sculpture by Welsh artist Barry Flanagan. He specializes in hares - this piece is called "Thinker on a Rock." It's located in between Graham Chapel and the Mallinckrodt Center.

    I've put additional snapshots of the Wash. U campus in a travelogue.

    Hare-brained?
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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