Sibley Travel Guide

  • Sibley
    by basstbn
  • Missouri River
    Missouri River
    by Fewf
  • on a even keelboat
    on a even keelboat
    by yooperprof

Sibley Things to Do

  • basstbn's Profile Photo

    by basstbn Updated Feb 16, 2005

    Fort Osage National Historic Landmark is a reconstruction (not a restoration*) of the fur-trade fort built high above the Missouri River in 1808. William Clark (Meriwether Lewis' traveling partner) returned to the area to establish this first U.S. outpost in the Louisiana Purchase.

    A number of buildings have been recreated, and docents in period costume on hand to share their knowledge with you. As seasoned travelers know, the best time to visit is an off-peak day when you are not in a hurry. If you appear interested and ask a few questions, you will learn far more than a memorized tourist spiel.

    Photos from the fort are/will be shown in my Fort Osage travelogue.

    *The original fort was dismantled to supply timber for the newly constructed homes and barns in the upstart town - hence the need to reconstruct the old fort from scratch.

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  • yooperprof's Profile Photo

    by yooperprof Written Jul 2, 2004

    A "factory" on the frontier was a kind of warehouse and trading center, operated under Federal supervision - and under generalized military control. William Clark was responsible for the original layout of the encampment, which includes not only soldiers' barracks and officer's quarters, but also a central kitchen and a "trade house."

    French colonial influence?
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Sibley Shopping

  • basstbn's Profile Photo

    by basstbn Updated Feb 15, 2005

    As you approach Sibley from the south (I believe it is county road BB) you will notice Sibley Orchard's farm store on the right. It's a nice little place to stop and pick up some fresh and nutricious snacks for your picnic or to take home for later. There are a number of items available - most of which are produced by Sibley Orchards or their neighbors.

    What to buy: In season - Sibley Orchard's own freestone peaches, and the blueberries and blackberries from neighboring farms. Also: sweet corn, tomatoes, and other summer-time vegetables. In the fall it's the place to get your apples, freshly-pressed apple cider, and pumpkins.

    What to pay: You'll pay about the same prices as in local supermarkets, but the product will be far fresher and tastier.

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Sibley Favorites

  • yooperprof's Profile Photo

    by yooperprof Updated Jul 2, 2004

    Favorite thing: Several members of the Corps of Discovery are following the example of William Clark two hundred years ago by keeping journals of their experience. One fellow is a PhD student at Ohio University and is planning to write his doctoral dissertation on the historiographical and philosophical implications of Lewis & Clark remembrance.

    Scott Mandrell, who is "playing" Meriweather Lewis, is posting his journal on the net- a historical blog you can call it. The journal entries are regularly updated - it's interesting to follow along. It's very emotionally moving when Mandrell/Lewis writes about the unexpected death of Seaman, his devoted dog. (The original Seaman of 1804 made it all the way to the Pacific - and back; but the 2004 Seaman died suddenly while still in Missouri.)

    http://www.lewisandclark.net

    laptop computers not allowed
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  • yooperprof's Profile Photo

    by yooperprof Written Jul 2, 2004

    Favorite thing: The National Park Service sponsors a travelling exhibit which is criss-crossing the United States commemorating the Lewis & Clark journey. There are exhibits which tell the history, and the "Tent of Many Voices" which is a performance space for lectures, musical acts, and historic re-creations.

    The "Corps of Discovery II" is funded by a number of Federal Agencies, and travels in this well-decorated semi across the country.

    Truck of History
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  • yooperprof's Profile Photo

    by yooperprof Updated Jul 2, 2004

    Favorite thing: The Missouri River flows quite rapidly today - much faster than it did 200 years ago. I think you can tell that this is a seriously moving river from this snapshot. (Someone told me that the current speed was five feet a second!)

    The Re-enactors were set up at the place where Lewis & Clark are thought to have "camped" in 1804. Notice the "portapotties" in the lower left hand corner of the photo - they are a modern convenience that the Corps of Discovery did not have. (Actually, the "portapotties" were mandated by the National Park Service - the require the sanitary disposal of human waste.)

    Much of the "gear" for the Enactors is carried in the keelboat and in the two smaller "canoes" that accompany it - just as before. And _some_ of the Enactors do travel on water. But some of the gear - and most of the Enactors - travel from encampment to encampment by government van.

    shall we gather at the river?
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