Helena Things to Do

  • Last Chance Gulch Mall
    Last Chance Gulch Mall
    by melissa_bel
  • Old Governors Mansion
    Old Governors Mansion
    by TooTallFinn24
  • Stately Homes to Be Seen In Helena
    Stately Homes to Be Seen In Helena
    by TooTallFinn24

Best Rated Things to Do in Helena

  • melissa_bel's Profile Photo

    St-Helena Cathedral

    by melissa_bel Updated Dec 26, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of the spires of St-Helena Cathedral

    I would have really liked to spend more time into this cathedral! Modelled after the Dom of Cologne and the Votive Church of Vienna, this gothic style cathedral is a beauty!
    You cannot miis it! The twin spires are 230 feet high.
    The building was open for Christmas of 1914.

    When I was there, there was a very important funeral about to begin so, we only had a glimpse of the inside but it is really majestic with imposing columns, marble, gold leafs and stained glasses imported from Bavaria.

    The St. Helena Cathedral is open year-round, from 10:00am - 4:00pm. Daily Mass is held in the Day Chapel on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 8:00am; and on Tuesday and Thursday, 5:20pm. Pre-arranged guided tours take 1 hour.

    Was this review helpful?

  • melissa_bel's Profile Photo

    Last Chance Gulch Street

    by melissa_bel Written Dec 23, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Last Chance Gulch Mall

    Helena's main street is located where the Last Chance Creek stood. This is where the “Four Georgians” (John Cowan, Daniel Jackson Miller, John Crab, and Reginald, or Robert Stanley) found gold in 1864. The claim was staked and named “Last Chance Gulch.” The group worked there until 1867 and then went back East, now rich.
    Nowadays, North Last Chance Gulch is a pedestrian mall filled with historical buildings, saloon, restaurants, shops, coffee houses...
    Along the mall, you will find many works of arts representing the heritage of Helena: cow-boy, train, mining, the press (Helena owes it to have won the capital title)...
    A very enjoyable walk indeed!

    Was this review helpful?

  • melissa_bel's Profile Photo

    The strange story of the Goddess of Liberty

    by melissa_bel Updated Dec 26, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Goddess of Liberty on top of Helena's Capitol

    Like many capitols in the US, Helena has its Lady Liberty atop the building but the story of how it got there is really strange. During the "Capital fight", the people responsible for the plans ran off with all the papers and records.
    During construction, a statue of a Goddess of Liberty arrived from back East with no indications about who ordered it and for what use. The company who made the statue had all their records lost in a fire and no one claimed the abandonned goddess. The builders wanted such a statue for their building and they used it.

    Was this review helpful?

  • melissa_bel's Profile Photo

    Montana State Capitol Building

    by melissa_bel Written Dec 23, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Montana State Capitol in Helena

    The most imposing building in town is the State Capitol, symbol of the authority of Montana.
    After a bitter and controversial fight for the capital title with Anaconda, Helena won after a controversed statewide election. Construction of the Capitol started in 1899 and the building was open on July 4th 1902.
    In front of the building is a statue of general Thomas Francis Meagher that was added in 1905. He was an officer in the Union Army and replaced the governor of the territory of Montana when he was away. He also wrote a draft of Constituion for Montana, in case it would become a state. He died misteriously in Fort Benton on the Missouri River while waiting for a gun shipment. To this day, no one knows if he drowned or was murdered.
    A few years later, as Montana grew, other wings were added to the building.

    The Capitol is now undergoing a renovation so, the statue might not be here and the building can be accessed through the back entrance.

    Was this review helpful?

  • melissa_bel's Profile Photo

    Montana State Capitol Building 2

    by melissa_bel Written Dec 23, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The rotunda paintings in the Capitol

    The first thing you'll notice in the building is the big painted rotunda with medallions representing important people in the history of Montana at the times : Cow-boy, Natives, Explorer and Miner . The tones are warm red and yellow with touches of green.
    A grand stairways goes up from the lobby and you'll be bathed in a golden light coming from stained glass overlooking the gardens in the back and covering this aisle of the Capitol.
    All three powers were housed in the building: the House and Senate of Montana, the Governor's office and the Supreme Court (now in another building close by but the Old Supreme Court remains).

    The building is filled with paintings depictiung important moment in Montana's history. The most important one being : "Lewis and Clarck Meeting The Indians" At Ross Hole as a remembrance of the moment when the two explorers' party met with Salish Indians and asked them for the best way to cross the moutains and reach the Pacific.
    It is also filled with statue, one of which is Jeanette Rankin, the first woman to be elected in the US House in 1916. You can see it in the House room, above the Speaker's chair. Talking about that, the House and Senate floors are pretty neat. The dark woods and paintings give it a stately and solemn air that's guaranteed to make you take the State's business seriously. The Senate and Old Court are located at the second floor (If I'm not mistaken) around the Rotunda while the House is at the third floor in another part of the building.
    The Governor's Office is on the first floor, at the end of the aisles starting from the lobby (the other side is the State Secretary Ofiice).

    According to Justin, it was the beautifullest Capitol he had ever seen.

    For more pictures, visit the travelogue!

    Was this review helpful?

  • melissa_bel's Profile Photo

    Montana Historical Museum

    by melissa_bel Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The cow head in frontm of Montana's Museum.

    For those interested in Montana history, this is the place to go.
    From Native artifacts to painting, from firearms to tools used in mining, farming, ranching, from gems to costumes, this Museum covers a lot of grounds.
    The cow head skeleton gracing the entrance, is the work of a Native artist.

    There is also a Library and research center.

    Opening hours:
    May 1 through September 30
    Monday through Saturday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
    Thursday evenings until 8:00 p.m.
    Closed Sundays and Holidays.
    October 1-April 30
    Monday through Saturday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
    Thursday evenings until 8:00 p.m.
    Closed Sundays, and Holidays.

    Entrance Fee:
    $5 per adult
    $1 per child
    $12 per family
    Members Free
    Group tours by reservation only.

    Was this review helpful?

  • TooTallFinn24's Profile Photo

    Algerian Shrine Temple

    by TooTallFinn24 Updated Oct 8, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Algerian Shrine Building
    1 more image

    Driving past the Helena Cathedral we came upon a building with a definite Moorish look and what appeared to be a tall minaret. I told my wife that I was going to stop the car to take some pictures. Upon getting close enough, lettering on the building informed me that it was the Civic Center. I left Helena, Montana believing that all major city offices were housed in that building. Getting back to Sacramento and checking on-line I found out that it had an interesting past and no longer houses city offices.

    The building was built in 1920 to serve as the offices of the Algeria Shrine. During the 1935 Montana earthquake the building suffered major damage. It was purchased shortly thereafter by the City of Helena and served as city offices until 1976. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1988, Today the building houses a 2,000 person ballroom with 15,000 feet of exhibition hall. It is frequently rented out for community events and large weddings. The building premises also houses a fire department and police station of the City of Helena.

    Was this review helpful?

  • melissa_bel's Profile Photo

    Tower Hill

    by melissa_bel Written Dec 23, 2004

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fire Tower

    On top of Tower Hill, lies one of Helena's landark. The Fire Tower. From that vantage point of view, the tower has served as a guardian of the city. There's been a tower since 1869 but this one dates from 1884.

    Was this review helpful?

  • TooTallFinn24's Profile Photo

    Atlas Block in Downtown Helena

    by TooTallFinn24 Written Oct 8, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Atlas Building - Front View
    3 more images

    Several of the streets that occupy downtown Helena have been given a name and wayfinding signs The Atlas block is so named because of a grand building with a uniquely ordained roof message. Samuel Jones was a businessman who owned an insurance company and wanted to convey the concept of how getting insurance would protect individuals from the hazard of fire. The combination of white salamanders and other creatures on a metal canopy of his 1889 building that are not affected by the flames was an instant hit and has become a notable part of Helena's past. A figure on the canopy also appears to hold the weight of the building on its shoulders thus the name Atlas. Over the years the building has been home to a large department store, saloon and offices. According to the very informative Downtown Helena web site the building's architecture is of Richardsonian Romanesque style. Definitely a strikingly pretty building and one worth taking several pictures of.

    Just down the block from the Atlas Building is a multi color statue of a dog. While I tried to find information about this dog and its story I have so far been unsuccessful. The little dog made such a great picture however it had to be included as part of this page.

    Was this review helpful?

  • TooTallFinn24's Profile Photo

    Walk the Trolley Block on Last Chance Gulch

    by TooTallFinn24 Written Oct 9, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Wayfinding Sign for Trolley Block
    1 more image

    The pedestrian mall on Last Chance Gulch has several streets christened by different names. The Trolley Block is named in respect after the trolleys that once graced the streets of Helena. It was the third street that I came upon on that cool Sunday morning in Helena.

    Back in 1883, the Northern Pacific Railroad located in Helena. With the arrival of the train passengers needed to be ferried from the station to downtown Helena. A system was developed of horse drawn trolley cars. Passengers were shuttled from the train depot to downtown for ten cents. However the trolley was very slow and a small system of locomotives was brought in. The locomotives were dirty and noisy and lasted only a few years. Finally, a system of electrified trolley cars was installed. Several different companies had cars that competed for business. The electric trolley cars lasted for over 35 years until the allure of the auto made it difficult to compete. The last of the trolley cars went out of business in 1927.

    The trolley car on the Trolley Block was donated by the Coveys. Mr. Covey was a Great Falls state legislator who along with his wife have restored many buildings throughout Montana. The trolley car is testament to an earlier time of getting around Helena and the main feature of the Trolley Block. However sipping my coffee drink I may have missed some of the other sites on the block.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Ride The Last Chance Tour Train

    by lctours Updated May 29, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ride the Last Chance Tour Train and experience Helena's colorful past. From its beginning, spurred by the discovery of gold in Last Chance Gulch to the present. You'll hear wonderful stories as you sit back, relax and enjoy the ride through the "Queen City of the Rockies". Operating season Memorial Day week-end through September 15th.

    Related to:
    • Seniors
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Gates of the Mountains

    by montana40 Updated Jul 21, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Boat trip on Holter lake into spectacular canyon area so named by Lewis and Clark. Historic and stunning scenery.
    Option of camping/picnic in Mann Gulch, immortalized by Norm McLean's _Young Men and Fire_, take one boat out, take a later one back.
    Bring a jacket, even in the summer, though. It can get astonishingly cold when the sun ducks behind a cloud.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • TooTallFinn24's Profile Photo

    Cathedral of Helena:

    by TooTallFinn24 Updated Oct 7, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Impressive Towers and Facade of Helena Cathedral
    1 more image

    We were totally unprepared for a church of this beauty and height in Helena, Montana. The Cathedral of Helena standing over 240 feet high with its two great towers is both impressive to look at from above the town as well as up close.

    The cathedral was part of a long term effort in the town of Helena to build a magnificent cathedral. The effort moved into full swing in 1905 when a generous gift of land made purchase of the remaining land more economical. A working group to build the cathedral was formed and decided on an Hungarian born but Austrian educated architect by the name of Albert Von Houblis to design the cathedral. At the time of his hiring he was living in Washington D.C. and had been involved in the design of several other catholic churches. Von Houblis submitted designs of both Gothic and Romanesque Styles to the church steering committee. They chose the Gothic style which was modeled after the Cologne Cathedral. Construction of the church began in 1908 and was completed in 1914.

    There have been several major repairs and renovations to the church over the years. In 1935 the south tower of the church was heavily damaged by an earthquake. In the mid 1950's a bronze altar and grillwork was added to the sanctuary.

    Unfortunately our visit was timed on a Sunday morning when regular worship services were in order. We chose not to disturb the congregation by peering into the church and taking pictures. However if we come back we will certainly sign up for a tour of this magnificent cathedral.

    Was this review helpful?

  • TooTallFinn24's Profile Photo

    Power Building on Power Block

    by TooTallFinn24 Written Oct 9, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Power building
    1 more image

    Walking around downtown Helena early on a Sunday morning I came on a magnificent building at the corner of Sixth and Main Street. Engraved above the front entrance were the words power buidling. Apparenty because of the size and grandeur of the six story Power building the entire block came to be known as the Power block. The building was built by local magnate, Thomas Power in 1889 as an office building that was built to last. Majestic in its appearance with light granite it still stands as a testament to well off times in the late 19th century. Unfortunately the building was not open but from the pictures on the Helena web site the inside is definitely worth seeing if you get the chance.

    Was this review helpful?

  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Capitol Building

    by mrclay2000 Written Feb 25, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    State Capitol Building, Helena, MT

    The Capitol Building in Helena rests on what amounts to one of the city's terraces leading into the foothills of the Rockies. Its front lawn during the right times of the year spells the word MONTANA using three different species of flowers. An equestrian statue of territorial governor Thomas Meagher stands out front (Meagher either drowned or was murdered on the Missouri River under mysterious circumstances in 1867.)

    Trolley rides give a general tour of downtown which has the feel of a mid-size town anywhere else in rural America.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Helena

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

58 travelers online now

Comments

Helena Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Helena things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Helena sightseeing.

View all Helena hotels