Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument Travel Guide

  • Trail at Benteen and Reno Battle Site
    Trail at Benteen and Reno Battle Site
    by fred98115
  • Indian Memorial
    Indian Memorial
    by fred98115
  • Last Stand Hill
    Last Stand Hill
    by fred98115

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument Highlights

  • Pro
    Bwana_Brown profile photo

    Bwana_Brown says…

     A very well organized and nice setting in the American west 

  • Con
    Bwana_Brown profile photo

    Bwana_Brown says…

     None that we could see 

  • In a nutshell
    KimberlyAnn profile photo

    KimberlyAnn says…

     A Historical National Monument, which preserves the story of Custer’s Last Stand. 

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument Things to Do

  • Monument to the US 7th Cavalry soldiers

    The Battle of Little Bighorn took place on 25-26 June, 1876 with the knoll and surrounding area where Custer and his men made their last stand being declared a US National Cemetery on 29 January 1879. This was to protect the remains of the approximately 220 Cavalry troopers who were buried there (in 1877 the officer's remains were removed to...

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  • Native American Memorial

    For more than 100 years after the battle, the National Park marking the defeat of General Custer was slanted as a memorial to only the US Cavalry troops involved in the battle. There were no memorials or gravestones to mark the sites of the many American Indians who also perished in the fierce fighting along the Little Bighorn River. It was only in...

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  • Take a short drive to the Reno-Benteen...

    This photo from where General Custer and his troops were killed shows the view down the Little Bighorn River (trees on the right) as well as a Park road that leads 5-miles to where the remainder of his force was also engaged in battle. We made the short drive along the road, passing many more white grave markers along the way.Prior to General...

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  • Scattered Grave Markers

    This view from the hilltop Memorial shows the sloping hillside where Custer and his troops made their last stand. After determining that American Indians were not far away, Custer had taken approximately 220 of his soldiers and Indian scouts (about a third of his total force) ahead of his main force and along the hillside above the Little Bighorn...

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  • Nicely Located Visitor's Center

    Our main objectives on this trip were Yellowstone/Grand Teton National Parks further west and south of Montana. We had pre-booked four nights accommodations inside/near these parks but decided to leave home two days earlier so we could do some exploring along the way. The main attraction I wanted to see was the Little Bighorn Battlefield National...

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  • A free Park Ranger tour or just 'Wing...

    There are National Park Rangers available at the Little Bighorn Battle site to give presentations at the Visitor Center on various aspects of the historic battle that took place here or to take groups of tourists on guided walking tours of the actual battle site. Alternatively, you are also free to just explore the entire area yourself with the...

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  • Visit Custer National Cemetery

    The National Cemetery was originally established in 1879 to protect the graves of the Seventh Cavalrymen who fell in the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Later, however, the role of the cemetery changed. In 1886 President Grover Cleveland set aside a larger area for the cemetery. As frontier forts in Montana, Wyoming, and the Dakotas were abandoned,...

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  • Keogh-Crazy Horse Fight

    In this area Indians lead by Crazy Horse and White Bull charged the retreating solders of Companies C and I, led by Captain Myles Keogh, who were trying to join Custer on Last Stand Hill. All members of company C and I were killed. Later Captain Keogh’s horse, Commanche, was found badly injured, but still alive. Commanche was nursed back to health...

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  • Lame White Man Charge

    The accounts of Indian warriors reported that the soldiers from Company C charged into the coulee that you see at this location. The charge was intended to break up the warriors who were massed there. The Indians retaliated with heavy fire, forcing the soldiers back to the ridge, were most were killed. Lame White Man was a Southern Cheyenne, who...

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  • Indian Encampment

    During the Campaign of June 1876, as the 7th Calvary converged on the Indians in the Little Bighorn River area, the army divided its regiments into various groups, each with a separate goal. At that time about 7,000 Lakota, Arapaho, and Cheyenne families were camped along the Little Bighorn River. Led by Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse, and other war...

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  • Sharp Shooter Ridge

    Sharpshotoers Ridge, was originally occupied by Custer, who watched Reno’s attack of the Indian camp in the valley, before he moved further north. Later in the battle, this hill was occupied by Sioux and Cheyenne warriors, giving them an advantage point from which to view Reno’s men. The warriors were armed with different types of weapons,...

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  • Reno’s Retreat

    At the end of the park road, you will find a trail titled Reno-Benteen Entrenchment Trail. You can pick up a small booklet here for $1.00 that will explain the various numbered markers that you will see as you walk this trail. In this area, Major Marcus Reno’s three companies were joined by Captain Fredrick Benteens battalion of three companies,...

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  • Last Stand Hill

    Last Stand Hill, a memorial for the 7th Cavalry, is located near the Indian Memorial, and again can be walked to from the Visitor Center or included as part of the drive. It was on this hill that Custer and about 41 men shot their horses so they could hid behind them, and made their last stand, as the Indians charged around them. In 1881, this...

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  • Indian Memorial

    Most folks walk up to the Indian Memorial from the visitor’s center, but you can also include this as part of your drive. Along with the death of Custer and his men, at least 100 American Indians died while trying to preserve their traditional ways of life and their right to live on the land of their ancestors rather than on designated...

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  • How to Visit

    After spending time at the Visitor Center, drive the park road, and take some or all of the walks. The 5-mile park tour road is a self-guiding drive. Using the park map that you will receive, you will follow the numbers on the map to various wayside signs along the road. At each stop, you will be able to observe and learn about the sites related to...

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  • Start With the Visitor Center

    The Battle of the Little Bighorn has fascinated people not just in the US, but also around the world. The battle tells of history, heroism, suffering, triumph, defeat, and tragedy. Before starting your tour, stop at the Visitor Center. Here you can ask the park rangers questions, get help in planning your visit, view museum exhibits, and watch a...

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  • Little Bighorn--The Indian monuments

    Here in 1876, 263 soldiers and attached personnel of the U.S. Army, including Lt. Col. George A. Custer, met death at the hands of several thousand Lakota and Cheyenne warriors. In 1881 the War Department erected a monument for the 7th Cavalry, civilian personnel, and Indian scouts killed in the battle. In 1991, the U.S. Congress changed the name...

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  • U.S. Army Memorial on Last Stand Hill

    The original U.S. Army Memorial on Last Stand Hill was built by Captain George Sanderson who wrote on April 7, 1879: "I accordingly built a mound out of cord wood filled in the center with all the horse bones I could find on the field. In the center of the mound I dug a grave and interred all the human bones that could be found, in all, parts of...

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Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument Restaurants

  • A nice sidewalk eating spot

    By the time we had finished our tour of the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, driven further west to Billings, Montana and then checked into our second motel, we were feeling both hungry and thirsty. Fortunately, downtown Billings looked very interesting, the sun was shining and a nice breeze was blowing as we set out on a stroll to see...

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  • Eating on the Run!

    We left Regina, Saskatchewan in mid-afternoon to start our long drive to the first accommodations in Glendive, Montana. We were quite hungry by the time we reached Stuart, MT so stopped to order a couple of Mcdonald's chicken salad plates. Sue enjoyed her meal as we drove, but I ate only a part of mine in the parking lot so we could continue onward...

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  • Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument Hotels

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Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument Transportation

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    Starting into foothills of the Rockies

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Aug 11, 2010

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    Our planned vacation in Yellowstone/Grand Teton National Parks was only a little more than 1000-km (620 miles) away from Regina, Saskatchewan so we decided a car was the easiest and most economical way to do it. Our 2004 Honda Accord did the job quite nicely, including our spur-of-the-moment tour of the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument as we passed by in this part of Montana. We only had about four days in the National Parks so it came in very handy for touring just about all areas of both parks. On the final day of our vacation, we left Cody, Wyoming (not far south of where this photo was taken) for a 1200-km (12 hour) drive back to Regina.

    This view was taken on Highway 212 near Red Lodge, Montana as we began to sight mountains in the distance as we headed for the sharply climbing road up to Yellowstone's Northeast Entrance.

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    • Road Trip
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Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument Local Customs

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    Custer National Cemetery

    by KimberlyAnn Written Jan 12, 2010

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    National Cemeteries are designed to be shrines to honor the dead who served in the Armed Forces of the United States. While visiting these cemeteries visitors are expected to behave in a way that will not cause a disturbance to the quiet, serious, atmosphere of the cemetery. No form of sport is allowed, including no jogging, racing, skating, skateboarding, ball games, Frisbees, etc. This is also not a place to have a picnic or sunbath. Radios, pets, and alcoholic beverages are not allowed in the cemetery. Be respectful of the grave sites at all time, and do not sit, lean, or stand on headstones. If you have children, you will be expected to supervise them, so that they will behave in a quiet, appropriate way.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park

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Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument Warnings and Dangers

  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    by mrclay2000 Updated Dec 11, 2002

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    This is rattlesnake country. Be especially aware when walking off the pavement that your visit might end abruptly with fang punctures in your foot or heel. Warning signs abound throughout the grounds. Take heed and enjoy what you can of your visit.

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Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument Off The Beaten Path

  • Little Bighorn Battlefield

    If you enjoy history you will enjoy Little Bighorn Battlefield. You are able to walk along trails within the actual battle ground so you can stand where the fighting took place and get multiple vantage points on many events of the overall battle. You don't need a ranger to explain things to you as long as you can read - there are a lot of materials...

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  • Prairee Dog Hill

    On the drive up the hill to the entrance for Little Bighorn National Monument, there is a huge protected praire dog colony that's fun to watch, but difficult to photograph.

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Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument Favorites

  • Understanding the Memorial Headstone...

    When visiting the monument, it is important to understand the memorial marble headstone markers that will be spread out along the driving and walking trails. You will see two colors, red and white. After the battle the Lakota and Cheyenne Indians collected their dead, placed them in tepees and on scaffolds along hillsides in a traditional manner....

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  • The General Is Absent from the assembly

    Visit Custer's FORMER gravesite on the hilltop beyond the visitor center. Custer's remains were disinterred within the year and transferred at his family's request for re-burial at West Point in 1877

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