Fun things to do in Montana

  • (c) 2009 Maria Olson
    (c) 2009 Maria Olson
    by Dymphna1
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    View downriver from Rainbow Falls
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Montana

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Pompeys Pillar

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 10, 2004

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    William Clark had nicked named Sacajawea son Jean Baptiste - "Pomp", a Shoshoni word for Chief. And is was on this returning trip Lewis and Clark split up, with Clark taking the Yellowstone River. They encountered the most impressive sandstone butte beside the river on July 25, 1806.

    Clark wrote in his journal,

    "This rock which I shall call "Pompy's Tower" is 200 feet and 400 paces in secumpherance.....the nativs have ingraved on the face...the figures of animals and near which I marked my name and the day of the month & year."

    For many years thereof, "Pompeys Pillar" became the landmark for people traveling westward that left their signatures too for their loved ones to know they had survived the trip and to note the trail they were on.

    Rates & Fees
    $3.00 per vehicle (Day)
    $25.00 per bus or group
    Admission is free with Golden Age, Golden Access, and Golden Eagle Passports.

    Seasons / Hours
    Memorial Weekend through Labor Day: 8:00 am - 8:00 pm daily
    Labor Day through September 30: 9:00 am - 5:00 pm

    Walk in traffic permitted during the off season. Please respect your cultural heritage.

    Fishing on the Yellowstone River at Pompeys Pillar National Monument allowed with a valid Montana State Fishing License.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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    Elkhorn hot springs

    by EllenH Written Jan 8, 2005

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    In the summer it is cool enough in the morning and high enough in elevation to enjoy the hot water and the other nearby attractions. In the winter, they have miles of groomed cross country ski trail and there is nothing better after cross country skiing then hot springs!
    They also have rooms, cabins, and a very cool lodge/restaurant.

    The pool
    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Spa and Resort
    • Skiing and Boarding

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    Clark's Signature In Stone

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 26, 2004

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    Clark wrote in his journal,

    "This rock which I shall call "Pompy's Tower" is 200 feet and 400 paces in secumpherance.....the nativs have ingraved on the face...the figures of animals and near which I marked my name and the day of the month & year."

    For many years thereof, "Pompeys Pillar" became the landmark for people traveling westward that left their signatures too for their loved ones to know they had survived the trip and to note the trail they were on.

    William Clark had nicked named Sacajawea son Jean Baptiste - "Pomp", a Shoshoni word for Chief. And is was on this returning trip Lewis and Clark split up, with Clark taking the Yellowstone River. They encountered the most impressive sandstone butte beside the river on July 25, 1806.

    Rates & Fees
    $3.00 per vehicle (Day)
    $25.00 per bus or group
    Admission is free with Golden Age, Golden Access, and Golden Eagle Passports.

    Seasons / Hours
    Memorial Weekend through Labor Day: 8:00 am - 8:00 pm daily
    Labor Day through September 30: 9:00 am - 5:00 pm

    Walk in traffic permitted during the off season. Please respect your cultural heritage.

    Fishing on the Yellowstone River at Pompeys Pillar National Monument allowed with a valid Montana State Fishing License.

    Click on it to see the signature!
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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  • melissa_bel's Profile Photo

    The drive up

    by melissa_bel Updated Dec 19, 2004

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    From the Creek valley, the road keeps going up pretty quickly. From 5,200 feet, the road rise at 8.000 feet in 12 miles along the moutain in sumerous swtichbacks! Stop at Vista Point for a bathroom break and the view! From alpine (lots of evergreens), the vegetation becomes smaller and scarcer. From trees to grass and bushes and finally lichen and moss with patches of snow that the sun never melts. You finally reach the top and the border with Wyoming, crossing the 45th parallel, halway between the Pole and the Equator!
    The first stop after that is the Red Lodge summer ski training camp at 10.700 feet. Should you decide to get out the car and walk to have a better view of the moutain range (like this picture), be careful as the altitude will play triks on your body. The air is rarefied already so DO NOT RUN. Go slowly or you'll black out. Justin and I almost did going back to the car. We did not feel a thing at first (except a little shortness of breath) but then, as I was rushing towards the car, I felt dizzy and big black spots started dancing in front of my eyes and Justin had the same thing happen to him almost at the same time so... careful there! The culminating point of the road, Beartooth pass is 10,974 at the West Summit Overlook and the amazing display of windswept tundra, moutain peaks and Beartooth Plateau.

    View from the top!

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    Cooke City, the end or the beginning?

    by melissa_bel Updated Dec 13, 2004

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    Cooke City is an old mining town and the end of the highway. Dominated by the towering Soda Butte, this sleepy little town offers a rest for the traveller and his one of the access to Yellowstone National Park. Coffee can be drunk, bikes can be rented... a few miles further, you will reach Silver Gates and the entrance of Yellowstone National Park.
    For the rest of the story, visit my Yellowstone page and for more pictures, go check my album!

    Cooke City and Soda Butte

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  • melissa_bel's Profile Photo

    Red Lodge, the starting point

    by melissa_bel Written Dec 13, 2004

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    As previously said in my travel report, Red Lodge is a lovely little low-key ski resort far from the glitz of its Rocky Mountains sisters of Vail, Coloroda Springs or even Big Sky. If you need a coffee or drinks or anything, it's a recommended stop as you won't find anything (exept a few rest stops on the way up on the Highway) until Cooke City.

    From Red Lodge, the road takes us south on US 212 along Rock Creek until you reach the Custer National Forest. Soon, the road starts going up and up. From this point on, it might take you a couple of hours, especially if you stop a lot on the way to admire the viewsand it is awesome at this point as a mountain circus is displayed in front of you.

    Red Lodge's main street.

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  • EllenH's Profile Photo

    Symes hot springs

    by EllenH Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This is an old hotel restored to the original 30's look and feel. The bedrooms are all art deco furniture and it has a very comfortable lobby where everyone hangs out. I did not want this under hotels because going to the Symes is not about a place to stay, it is an adventure in itself. The mineral water is the best I have ever been in and I try to find hot springs wherever I go. They have good music on Saturday nights and it is very inexpensive.

    Soaking it up
    Related to:
    • Spa and Resort
    • Family Travel
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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  • EllenH's Profile Photo

    Grab the brass ring....

    by EllenH Written Jul 25, 2004

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    Ok this may seem kind of hokey to some but if you are in Missoula you really should check out the carousel. A carousel for Missoula is the first fully hand carved carousel to be built in the U.S. since the depression. Volunteers from Missoula and around spent thousands of hours carving, painting, sanding, restoring mechanical parts, and fund raising to construct one of the fastest carousels in the country (and it is fast). And it is fun for big and small kids alike and they really do have the brass ring thing.

    A Carousel for Missoula
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Family Travel

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  • melissa_bel's Profile Photo

    Pilot and Index Peak

    by melissa_bel Written Dec 13, 2004

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    After driving aproximately on a plateau, quite desolate and filled with glacial lakes, the road starts to go down. The main feature on the other side of the pass id the odd Pilot and Index Peak. A mountain with 2 peaks that you just cannot miss.11.000 feet high,those peaks are the remnant of a volcano. The Scenic overlook will offer a great view of thess spectacular peaks as well as the Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness and the Clarck Fork Valley. After the Shoshone National Forest, the road loops back into Montana and finally reach its first sign of civilization: Cooke City.

    Pilot and Index Peaks

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  • EllenH's Profile Photo

    Flathead Lake

    by EllenH Written Jan 8, 2005

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    On the way to Glacier is Flathead Lake. There is camping and fishing, cherries in July, one of Montanas few wineries on the west side of the lake, parasailing, canoeing, etc....It is a very beautiful part of Montana.

    east side Flathead Lake
    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Camping
    • Budget Travel

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  • Dymphna1's Profile Photo

    Ghost hunting

    by Dymphna1 Written Oct 12, 2010

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    There are several different ghost town in Montana. Garnet was just listed in 2010 as a Ghost Town. People had to be pretty tough to live here at that time.

    There is a $3.00 fee for entry and is done on the honor system.

    This is a self guided tour. Get a pamphlet and you can go in most of the buildings. Some I don't recommend going is as they don't look too stable.

    Camping is not allowed at the town proper, but you can camp for free anywhere else, just no facilities.

    Although they do rent a couple of the cabins in the winter to snowmobilers. There is one that sleeps 6 and one that sleeps 4 (very cozy). There is a wood stove for heat and propane for lights. You haul everything else.

    Ellen & I over looking Garnet Over looking Garnet A three hole outhouse. Interesting. How the hotel restraunt was laid out The town was based upon mining.
    Related to:
    • Camping
    • Archeology
    • National/State Park

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  • EllenH's Profile Photo

    Road Trip

    by EllenH Written Sep 5, 2004

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    Montana is a huge, not very populated state so flying into one place and staying there would hardly give you the feel for what we are about. One of the roads out of Yellowstone National Park is from North Yellowstone to Livingston through the Paradise valley. (oh yea home to the rich and famous but ignore that) I am always amazed when I see the Paradise valley by not only how beautiful it is but how unpopulated it is. There are miles and miles of open gorgeous space.

    Paradise valley
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Study Abroad
    • Road Trip

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  • melissa_bel's Profile Photo

    The starting point for our Beartooth Highway drive

    by melissa_bel Written Dec 13, 2004

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    Our trip starts at Columbus, our new hometown (more about Columbus in my travel page). We took State Road 78 towards Absarokee. Once Absarokee is passed, it's a lovely drive through the hills and farmland as the mountains are looming larger and larger until you reach the foot and drive along them until Red Lodge. For those of you coming from Billings, take I-90 West and at Laurel, take US 212 until Red Lodge.

    The Beartooth range seen just after Absarokee

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  • KazigluBey's Profile Photo

    Visit Glacier National Park

    by KazigluBey Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Park has some of the most breath taking natural beauty I have seen anywhere.

    It is very inexpensive and only cost us a few dollars to enter.

    The road we took was called the "Going to the Sun Highway."

    I can't recommend driving this road enough.

    We had to stop every little ways to take in the views and hike and explore!

    Be sure and check ahead before going there, as it is up in the Glaciers and the road is only open a couple months a year in the middle of the summer! :)

    Somewhere On the Way to the Sun Highway
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Backpacking
    • National/State Park

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  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Little Bighorn Battlefield

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 17, 2004

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    This is located on the Crow Reservation. Park rangers give a tour and educate those properly with the events that lead up to the battle of Custers Last Stand. It has as a very nice vistor center with restrooms. If you look out into the fields you can see white markers that show where the U.S. Army's Seventh Cavalry soldiers fell and died. It's a very humbling sight to see.

    Little Bighorn was fought on June 25-26, 1876 lead by Lt Col. George Armstrong Custer. 262 soldiers of the 7th Cavalry, guided by Crow and Arikara scouts, met at terrible death by an overwhelming force of over 1,500 Lakota Sioux, Cheyenne and Arapaho warriors. It was his own arrogance that he could actually defeat such an overwhelming force. It was also later discovered that no only being out numbered, they were out gunned by better weaponry.

    Operating Hours & Seasons
    Memorial Day to Labor Day: 8:00 a.m. to 9 p.m. Spring and Fall: 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Winter: 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m

    The entry fee is $10.00 per private vehicle; $5.00 for pedestrians, this includes motorcycles . Vans & Mini-Bus 7-25 people are $40. Motor Coach 26+ is $100.

    There is no charge for visiting the National Cemetery

    Little Big Horn Vistor Center
    Open
    Open All Year
    Open From 05/28 To 07/31and 08/01 To 09/01 8 a.m. - 9 p.m.and 8 a.m.- 8 p.m.
    Open From 09/04 To 10/01 8 a.m. - 6 p.m.
    Open From 10/01 To 03/31 8 a.m - 4:30 p.m

    The dark one is Custer's.
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park

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Montana Things to Do

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