Goldfield Things to Do

  • Goldfield Hotel, Goldfield, NV
    Goldfield Hotel, Goldfield, NV
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  • Goldfield Hotel, Goldfield, NV
    Goldfield Hotel, Goldfield, NV
    by atufft
  • Goldfield Hotel
    Goldfield Hotel "Gold Room" Entrance
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Most Recent Things to Do in Goldfield

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    More Goldfield Hotel Images

    by atufft Updated Apr 30, 2011

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    Goldfield Hotel, Goldfield, NV
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    The size of this building, and the vacant attempts to renovate it deserve more images. The backside includes an a/c shaft and improved elevator system, neither of which are operational. Also, there's a US Geological Survey marker retrofit to the main entrance flooring. The building is believed to sit on an old mine shaft. Finally, note the interior shot, where 2x4 lumber is used to support the structure.

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    Blake/Fellis House

    by atufft Written Apr 30, 2011

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    Blake/Fellis House in Goldfield, NV

    The white house behind the bright red Santa Fe Motel and Saloon sign, on the corner of Crook and 5th Avenues, is a house originally built by real-estate broker EE Blake in 1907. in 1919 it was purchased and was moved to its current location by Peter Fellis, who lived in there and operated a candy store from this great location in the center of town, not far from the high school. George and Peter Fellis were prominent grocers who expanded the confectionary and grocery business into a larger building that burned down in the 1924 fire. This house, however, survived both fires.

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    Misc Wood Frame Houses on Franklin

    by atufft Updated Apr 30, 2011

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    Misc Wood Frame Houses in Goldfield, NV

    These two unidentified wood frame residential ruins on Franklin Ave, across from the Dusty Fender Grill and Fill gas station and restaurant, are circa (left to right) 1905 and 1908. It's amazing these didn't burn down in the great fires of 1923 and 1924, or haven't burned since then...

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    Brown & Parker Auto Company Garage

    by atufft Written Apr 30, 2011

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    Brown & Parker Auto Co., Goldfield, NV

    This early Ford Dealership, that served Goldfield for many years, moved to the corner of Crook Avenue and Columbia, just across from the Goldfield Hotel, in 1924, just a year after the devastating fire of 1923.

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    The Other Remaining Bottle House

    by atufft Updated Apr 30, 2011

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    Bottle House on Crook Avenue, Goldfield, NV
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    On the east side of Crook Avenue (US 95) between First and Second Streets, about midway between the Goldfield Hotel and the Goldfield Public Library, is the ruin of a bottle house built in 1905, one of two bottle houses to remain from the Goldfield boom era. I noticed some effort to prop it up from eventual collapse.

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    Yucca Mountain Project Public Information

    by atufft Written Apr 30, 2011

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    Yucca Mountain Outreach, Goldfield, NV

    South Down Crook Avenue from the Courthouse is a rather new structure built for the purpose of promoting the Yucca Mountain project. I don't know if this is for local residents or for the benefit of tourists, but Goldfield is actually not too close to Yucca Mountain. However, it has been chosen as the site for a public outreach office. See the link below for details about this supposedly stable underground nuclear waste storage facility within the salt cave mountain.

    The website notes that currently awaiting permanent geologic disposal are roughly 64,000 metric tons of spent reactor fuel in temporary storage at 120 operating and shut-down commercial nuclear power reactors in 36 states. In addition, there are the thousands of containers of highly radioactive waste arising from the cleanup of nuclear weapons production sites in Washington, South Carolina, and Idaho. Thus, Yucca Mountain could potentially receive all the nuclear waste produced within the USA.

    Originally, Nevada residents were enthusiastic about the prospect for jobs associated with such long term storage; however since the waste would have to travel by truck and rail through the Reno/Sparks and Los Vegas/Henderson metropolitan areas, a potential risk to residents along the transport route was exposed, turning Nevada voter sentiment has turned against the project.

    Also, while the Bush administration had approved the site for nuke waste storage, the Obama administration has reversed this plan, so the project seems less likely to be completed.

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    Charles S Sprague House

    by atufft Updated Apr 30, 2011

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    The Sprague House in Goldfield, NV
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    Built in 1907, Sprague came to Goldfield as an established newspaperman ready to buy and expand the success of the Goldfield News. The house is known as "The Gables", where Mrs. Blanche Sprague, descendent of Mayflower Ship passengers John Alden and Miles Standish, founded the Nevada branch of the Daughters of the American Revolution (1910). Note also in this series of images the original wooden street sign at the corner of Crook and Sundog Avenues.

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    DD Carney and John S Cook Houses

    by atufft Updated Apr 30, 2011

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    DD Carney House, Goldfield, NV
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    The house prominently featured in this series of photos, with the Dutch barn style roof, was built and lived in by early resident D.D. Carney (1908). The less well captured white house, slightly further south on Crook, actually on the corner of Crook and Belleview Avenues (behind the pedestrian sign in the photo) was built by prominent central Nevada banker, John S Cook in 1906. Ironically, while Cooks fledgling bank was the only Goldfield bank to survive the National Panic of 1907, and later grew into a powerful financial institution with several branches, it failed in 1932 during the Great Depression.

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    G. L. "Tex" Rickard House

    by atufft Updated Apr 30, 2011

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    Located one block south of the Goldfield Fire Station #1, on the corner of Crook and and Franklins Avenues, Rickard built this house in 1906. It remains as are residence and better preserved home in Goldfield. "Tex" Rickard was mine owner, saloon owner, and boxing promoter who eventually went on to manage Madison Square Gardens in New York City.

    Rickard is famous for having sponsored in an outdoor venue within Goldfield what was to become the world's longest boxing match--the 1906 Gans-Nelson Prize Fight. There's a stone marker for this 42 round fight near the ruins of the Las Vegas and Tonopah Passenger Railroad Station, on the north end of town, on Miners Avenue. This was a match between world title holding Dane "Battling" Nelson, and former world champion black Joe Gans. Wikipedia describes the fight as follows: [Nelson] defended the title once against Terry McGovern but then faced former champion Joe Gans on September 3, 1906, in Goldfield, Nevada. Gans dropped Nelson repeatedly during the bout, but could not knock him out. Finally, in the forty-second round, Nelson hit Gans low and was disqualified, losing the bout and his title.

    Believe it or not there's a black & white movie of this fight available on YouTube which you can access with the link below. I'm not absolutely positive that this is the same 42 round fight that was fought in Goldfield, but it does look like an outdoor even in the sun, which is what the Goldfield event was. I'll have to get a photo of the historical stone marker next time I drive through town.

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    E. A. Byler Bottle House

    by atufft Written Apr 30, 2011

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    E. A. Byler Bottle House, Goldfield, NV
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    US Deputy Mineral Surveyor and mining engineer, E. A. Byler built this bottle house in 1905, and it remains the best preserved of several bottle houses built in Goldfield. Who knows what building codes allowed this construction adjacent to the finely constructed Durgan house next door, but it's hard to imagine much harmony between the two if it were this day and age.

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    George W Durgan House

    by atufft Written Apr 30, 2011

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    George W. Durgan House, Goldfield, NV
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    Next door to the "Tex" Rickard House is one of the two best preserved stone houses in Goldfield, the George W. Durgan House, built in 1905. Durgan was an early Lessee, mine owner and superintendent. The house is marked with a sturdy white picket fence and #5 historical society marker out front along the sidewalk, as are many of the buildings in town.

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    Goldfield Public Library

    by atufft Updated Apr 30, 2011

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    Goldfield Public Libary
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    The Goldfield Public Library, where Amanda works, was originally (1908) built as the West Crook Street Middle School. This is a good place to stop by and learn about the town in general, and for those with RVs, an easy place to park, since it is right on US95 at the north entrance to town. This is one of four stone school building built during the boom period, according to the Historical Society literature. Nearby is an accumulation of authentic mining equipment that serves to welcome visitors into town.

    Unfortunately, the library affiliations are few and I wasn't able to find Amanda's website or e-mail contact information to provide information about this VT series. However, for this VT viewers, the Goldfield Historical Society does have a fundraising and information website, the link for which is below.

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    Enterprise Mercantile Adobe Warehouse Building

    by atufft Written Apr 30, 2011

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    Enterprise Mercantile Adobe Warehouse Building

    Adjacent to the Telephone company building, on Ramsey Street, is the unmarked Enterprise Mercantile Adobe Warehouse Building, one of the earlier structures still standing (1905). According to Historical Society literature, in the 1940's it housed the Beatty Bulletin and the Goldfield News. Today it has been boarded up and has a No Trespassing sign on the door, and this low roof structure also appears to have been repaired with cinderblock in places to fill for worn adobe brick. Not much of a building considering it's enterprising name, but the worn look and desert flora accent the ghost town look.

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    Ish-Curtis Registration Trust Company Building

    by atufft Written Apr 30, 2011

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    Ish-Curtis Registration Trust Company Building

    Next door to the Goldfield Consolidated Mines /Deep Mines Building is the Ish-Curtis Registration Trust Company Building (1907) which had on its three floors several occupants. The ground floor window is painted with the John S. Cook and Company Bankers, which had several offices in Nevada until all of them were closed in 1932. Recently, there was a hotel and cafe, but when I visited a posted sign explained that it was a private residence. This appears as one of the better kept buildings in town.

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    Goldfield Consolidated Mines Building

    by atufft Updated Apr 30, 2011

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    Goldfield Consolidated Mines Company Building
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    This stone building, on the corner of Columbia Street and Ramsey Ave, just a block east of the Goldfield Hotel and US95, was the powerful center of business for the chief gold mine bosses of the time, Senator George Nixon and George Wingfield, as much of the mine activity was consolidated under their control. In fact, the ownership and control of labor was also an issue as the US Army was dispatched to Goldfield in 1907 to quiet a miner's strike. Ironically, it was during this strike period that much of this labor was used to construct most of the permanent structures still seen today.

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