Goldfield Travel Guide

  • Goldfield, Nevada
    Goldfield, Nevada
    by atufft
  • Downtown Goldfield, NV
    Downtown Goldfield, NV
    by atufft
  • Goldfield Mining Equipment
    Goldfield Mining Equipment
    by atufft

Goldfield Highlights

  • Pro
    TinKan profile photo

    TinKan says…

     Old and neat 

  • Con
    BigMoons profile photo

    BigMoons says…

     There really is nowhere to Eat.. The Mozart has limited food.. You must go on to Tonopah to eat.. 

  • In a nutshell
    BigMoons profile photo

    BigMoons says…

     Boom and Bust.. A bright Star that had a super nova burst.. 

Goldfield Things to Do

  • More Goldfield Hotel Images

    The size of this building, and the vacant attempts to renovate it deserve more images. The backside includes an a/c shaft and improved elevator system, neither of which are operational. Also, there's a US Geological Survey marker retrofit to the main entrance flooring. The building is believed to sit on an old mine shaft. Finally, note the interior...

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  • Blake/Fellis House

    The white house behind the bright red Santa Fe Motel and Saloon sign, on the corner of Crook and 5th Avenues, is a house originally built by real-estate broker EE Blake in 1907. in 1919 it was purchased and was moved to its current location by Peter Fellis, who lived in there and operated a candy store from this great location in the center of...

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  • Misc Wood Frame Houses on Franklin

    These two unidentified wood frame residential ruins on Franklin Ave, across from the Dusty Fender Grill and Fill gas station and restaurant, are circa (left to right) 1905 and 1908. It's amazing these didn't burn down in the great fires of 1923 and 1924, or haven't burned since then...

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  • Brown & Parker Auto Company Garage

    This early Ford Dealership, that served Goldfield for many years, moved to the corner of Crook Avenue and Columbia, just across from the Goldfield Hotel, in 1924, just a year after the devastating fire of 1923.

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  • The Other Remaining Bottle House

    On the east side of Crook Avenue (US 95) between First and Second Streets, about midway between the Goldfield Hotel and the Goldfield Public Library, is the ruin of a bottle house built in 1905, one of two bottle houses to remain from the Goldfield boom era. I noticed some effort to prop it up from eventual collapse.

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  • Yucca Mountain Project Public...

    South Down Crook Avenue from the Courthouse is a rather new structure built for the purpose of promoting the Yucca Mountain project. I don't know if this is for local residents or for the benefit of tourists, but Goldfield is actually not too close to Yucca Mountain. However, it has been chosen as the site for a public outreach office. See the link...

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  • Charles S Sprague House

    Built in 1907, Sprague came to Goldfield as an established newspaperman ready to buy and expand the success of the Goldfield News. The house is known as "The Gables", where Mrs. Blanche Sprague, descendent of Mayflower Ship passengers John Alden and Miles Standish, founded the Nevada branch of the Daughters of the American Revolution (1910). Note...

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  • DD Carney and John S Cook Houses

    The house prominently featured in this series of photos, with the Dutch barn style roof, was built and lived in by early resident D.D. Carney (1908). The less well captured white house, slightly further south on Crook, actually on the corner of Crook and Belleview Avenues (behind the pedestrian sign in the photo) was built by prominent central...

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  • Jennie B Elder House and Beets Garage

    On the Crook Ave lots just south of the County Courthouse building are the Jennie B Elder House (1908) and the rusty old Beets Garage (1930).

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  • G. L. "Tex" Rickard House

    Located one block south of the Goldfield Fire Station #1, on the corner of Crook and and Franklins Avenues, Rickard built this house in 1906. It remains as are residence and better preserved home in Goldfield. "Tex" Rickard was mine owner, saloon owner, and boxing promoter who eventually went on to manage Madison Square Gardens in New York...

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  • E. A. Byler Bottle House

    US Deputy Mineral Surveyor and mining engineer, E. A. Byler built this bottle house in 1905, and it remains the best preserved of several bottle houses built in Goldfield. Who knows what building codes allowed this construction adjacent to the finely constructed Durgan house next door, but it's hard to imagine much harmony between the two if it...

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  • George W Durgan House

    Next door to the "Tex" Rickard House is one of the two best preserved stone houses in Goldfield, the George W. Durgan House, built in 1905. Durgan was an early Lessee, mine owner and superintendent. The house is marked with a sturdy white picket fence and #5 historical society marker out front along the sidewalk, as are many of the buildings in...

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  • Goldfield Public Library

    The Goldfield Public Library, where Amanda works, was originally (1908) built as the West Crook Street Middle School. This is a good place to stop by and learn about the town in general, and for those with RVs, an easy place to park, since it is right on US95 at the north entrance to town. This is one of four stone school building built during the...

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  • Enterprise Mercantile Adobe Warehouse...

    Adjacent to the Telephone company building, on Ramsey Street, is the unmarked Enterprise Mercantile Adobe Warehouse Building, one of the earlier structures still standing (1905). According to Historical Society literature, in the 1940's it housed the Beatty Bulletin and the Goldfield News. Today it has been boarded up and has a No Trespassing sign...

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  • Ish-Curtis Registration Trust Company...

    Next door to the Goldfield Consolidated Mines /Deep Mines Building is the Ish-Curtis Registration Trust Company Building (1907) which had on its three floors several occupants. The ground floor window is painted with the John S. Cook and Company Bankers, which had several offices in Nevada until all of them were closed in 1932. Recently, there was...

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  • Goldfield Consolidated Mines Building

    This stone building, on the corner of Columbia Street and Ramsey Ave, just a block east of the Goldfield Hotel and US95, was the powerful center of business for the chief gold mine bosses of the time, Senator George Nixon and George Wingfield, as much of the mine activity was consolidated under their control. In fact, the ownership and control of...

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  • Southern Nevada Consolidated Telephone...

    Actually called the Southern Nevada Consolidated Telephone and Telegraph Company Building, this structure was built in 1905, and so represents one of the earliest building to remain essentially unaltered since construction before the 1907 boom period. The original telephone and telegraph lines were extended from Tonopah in 1904, and so by 1907 with...

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  • Goldfield High School

    Clearly the most valuable building in town in danger of imminent collapse is the Goldfield High School building. Also built in 1907, the structure of considerable architectural interest held its last graduation in 1952. The historical literature for Goldfield claims this school building was one of only 4 stone school buildings built between 1906...

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Goldfield Restaurants

  • Another Possibility If Truly Open

    Prominently located at the northeast corner of Crook Avenue and Main Street, the Chat & Chew building occupies the place where the famous Hermitage Saloon was located. Unfortunately, the Hermitage Saloon burned down in the great fire of 1923, and the current Chat & Chew structure was built in 1925. The building still has the trappings of a...

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  • Practically the ONLY Place to Eat in...

    You don't want to fill-up here as the price of gas will be higher than either Reno or Las Vegas, but Dusty does produce a decent grilled hamburger with fresh sliced and fried potato chips. Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner menus are available, but the places serves mostly as a fast food stopover for tourists.

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Goldfield Transportation

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    Goldfield Chamber of Commerce

    by goldfield-nevada Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Be sure to stop in at the Chamber of Commerce during business hours for some better insight into the area and it's offerings. A foot tour of Goldfield is one of the best ways to find all it's treasures during daylight with a little assistance from your car here and there.

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Goldfield Shopping

  • Tourist Goldfield Kitsch

    On the north side of town, across from the Public Library is a rambling cluster of weather beaten buildings that collectively are a shop selling all sorts of junk related to the gold rush era that was Goldfield. One of the bargain items to buy is a chunk of the goldfield ore, but there are old bottles and other items found around the area. The...

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  • Mining Equipment for Sale

    Along Crook Avenue (US 95), north of the Goldfield Hotel is a for sale sign and a collection of mining equipment. Goldfield has become more active in recent years as the price of gold has increased to the point where mining the gold dust ore is more profitable.

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Goldfield Local Customs

  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    by mtncorg Written Sep 5, 2006

    Prostitution is legal in the US only in certain counties of Nevada. It is illegal in the two most populous counties even here though - Washoe (Reno) and Clark (Las Vegas). In 12 of the other counties, prostitution is operated quietly under the watchful eye of the community. The more lenient viewpoint towards the world's oldest profession arises out of the mining traditions of the State. Of course, that does not mean prostitution does not exist in Vegas or Reno either - just look at the over 100 pages of ads in the Las Vegas telephone book for 'Escort Services' - only that it is not as obvious as say Pahrump ('A hundred dollars Pahrump!') or here, along US 95 just south of Goldfield. The Cottontail Ranch is for sale if you are interested. Complete with its own airstrip. http:www.bordelforsale.com

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Goldfield Off The Beaten Path

  • Telegraph Building

    The building was one of a few spared by a fire that destroyed 53 blocks of the downtown area in 1923. Today, it is one of the few unspoiled examples of the work of the craftsmen of the early 1900 era

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  • Goldfield High School

    The school was built in 1907 in response to the burgeoning population that resulted from the gold and silver boom that began in 1902. Since the boom in Goldfield declined by 1910, and few modifications were needed, the large stone and brick school retains a high degree of integrity, although its condition has deteriorated severely. The Goldfield...

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  • US 95, 25 miles south of...

    US 95, 25 miles south of Tonopah and 182 miles northwest of Las Vegas.Truckers and cars just pass through without realizing the historic nature of Goldfield. Stop and walk through the Courthouse with displays, poems, old typewriters and desks. Look on the walls at old pictures of mining life and the town's heyday.

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Goldfield Favorites

  • TinKan's Profile Photo

    by TinKan Written Mar 24, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Goldfield was founded in 1902 as a mining camp and boasted a population of 30,000 during its boom year of 1907. It had produced $11 million dollars in gold as the gold production peaked in 1906. In 1907 Goldfield was Nevada's largest city with a population of around 30,000 people.

    The town bar was reported to have the longest bar counter. The Tex Rickard's Northern bar was so long it was reported to require 80 tenders to serve its customers. By the middle of 1912, ore production had dropped to less than $5 million dollars and a majority of the folks started to leave the once booming town.

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