Rhyolite Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by blueskyjohn
  • Things to Do
    by blueskyjohn
  • Things to Do
    by blueskyjohn

Most Recent Things to Do in Rhyolite

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    Exploring the rest of Rhyolite

    by blueskyjohn Updated Jul 9, 2014
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    There are quite a few structures still in tacked that you can check out. There is a small building with a sign in the window that says "Brothel." However, I'm sure the sign must have been put in the window recently. Portions of the jail are also visible.

    If you walk up the hill next to Isabella Haskins grave, you can get a good view of the entire town.

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    Grave of Isabella Haskins

    by blueskyjohn Updated Jul 9, 2014

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    Located behind the jail in Rhyolite and a fenced in grave where Isabella Haskins was laid to rest. According to the museum, Isabella's real name was Sarah Isabella Peters. The story about Isabella is that she became a prostitute to bail her boyfriend out of jail. This reputation stayed with her. One night her boyfriend beat her up in the local saloon. Later that night he shot her 4 times at their home. He claimed self defense but was found guilty of murder. The respectable people of Rhyolite protested against her being buried in the Rhyolite cemetery so here she rests for all eternity.

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    Goldwell Open Air Museum

    by blueskyjohn Updated Jul 9, 2014

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    Just on the line of Rhyolite is Goldwell Open Air Museum. It is a small shack house with some souvenirs and historical photos with stories inside. Outside is an array of art work created by Belgium artists. The most prominent was Albert Szukalski.

    Around the building you will see white ghostly figures. A very interesting sight. Szukalski used people from nearby Beatty to model as he molded the shrouds.

    Definitely worth a visit.

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    Rhyolite Train Depot

    by blueskyjohn Updated Jul 9, 2014

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    This is the most preserved building in Rhyolite and now has a fence surrounding it to prevent vandalism. The depot was built in 1906 to service the Las Vegas and Tonopah line. Trains stopped arriving in 1916 but that didn't stop the use of the Depot. Over the years the depot changed ownership several times. Over that time it served as a home, boarding house, casino/bar, a gift shop and even as a church. Of course not at the same time. Its a shame the fence is up but a guess a necessity.

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    Cook Bank

    by blueskyjohn Updated Jul 9, 2014

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    Probably the most photographed building at Rhyolite is the Cook Bank. The building was built by J.S. Cook and cost $90,000 in 1908. A lot of money back then and it turned out to be the biggest building in Rhyolite. But after only a few months the bank was absorbed by the First National Bank of Rhyolite. Cook remained the owner of the building but no longer the bank. The Post Office also operated out of the bank and was the last business to close in 1913. There were two other banks in town but with a devalue of the mines in the area and failing to produce any gold, all three closed in 1910.

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    Rhyolite Cemetery

    by blueskyjohn Updated Jul 9, 2014

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    On the outskirts of town, down a dusty dirt road in the cemetery for Rhyolite. Definitely an eerie place not only because its a cemetery but in the middle of the desert and Rhyolite being a "Ghost Town" created a strange feeling. It was interesting walking through the cemetery. Thinking of how the people lived their life as miners in this harsh environment.

    The is a bronze plaque at the entrance that reads "This enduring bronze is placed here to the blessed memory of those that sleep herein; and to the remembrance of all others who came this way and opened up this great Nevada desert mining-world by those who cared....April 1959"

    Another strange think here is that there is a picnic table. Not sure who would want to have a picnic at the cemetery. There is absolutely no trees or shade.

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    Las Vegas & Tonopah Depot ~1909

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 31, 2011

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    The first car roared in December of 1906 with supplies and passengers. But, when the town was headed into decline, the tracks were pulled up for use during WWI in 1917. So the building sat abandon until in the 1930's Pat McLauglin bought the building to be his home. Sadly, the San Francisco Corporation took over all his holdings, which including the depot. They converted the depot as a boarding house for the miners who were working still in the area. Then in 1935, a gentleman named Mr. Westmoreland bought it and installed a small casino and bar. Then in the 1950's it was passed down to his sister Mrs. Heisler and her Baptist Minister husband and she put in a gift shop in it. It served as a church for the few locals till the 1960's. Now the BLM owns it and keeps it maintain in rest of decay.

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    Bullfrog- Rhyolite Cemetery

    by Yaqui Updated Feb 6, 2011

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    The cemetery is about a mile away from town down a dirt road. It is so surreal because of the vast landscape of the desert with such a beautiful horizon. Many unmarkers graves, but many with some interesting headstones that tells the stories of who is at rest here.

    One of the most interesting personas is Panniment Ann~Mary Elizabeth Madison She was one hardy, hardworking and honest soul.

    There is a monument dedicated to the pioneers buried here. The plaque reads: Here to the Blessed memory of those who sleep herein and to the remembrance of all others who came this way and opened up this great Nevada desert mining world by those who cared April 1959.

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    Bullfrog Jail & Ice House ~1904

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 29, 2011

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    Bullfrog was another mining town, but not as substanial as Rhyolite. Quartz and gold was discovered in the nearby hill by prospectors Frank Harris and E.L.Cross on 1904. Since Rhyolite had not been discovered, the miners would head to Beatty to celebrate and get their supplies. There is not much left of the ice house, but the jail is enough in tact so you can imagine what it must have looked like.

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    Jail~1907

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 29, 2011

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    Before this jail was built, prisoners were kept at the Bullfrog jail just down the hill. What is still neat about this structure is the iron door and the bars on the windows are still in tact. So you can almost imagine what it would be like locked up in here. Still exposed to the heat or cold.

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    Red Light District Cabin~1905

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 29, 2011

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    Located in the red district, this cabin consisted of only two rooms and was considered part of many brothels. This building, the depot and the bottle house are the only buildings still intact. Although, this one has been rebuilt to save it.

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    Cooks Bank Building ruins ~1908

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 29, 2011

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    Built in 1908 at the grand cost of $90,000, it had three stories plus a basement. The post office was located in the basement, while the first floor was the bank, and the business offices were the second and third floors. The building had electric lights, steam heating, and beautiful marble floors. If you look closely at the outside, you can get a jest of how grand the detail of the building might had encompass.

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    Porter Brothers Store Ruins~1906

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 29, 2011

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    The Porter Brothers had three stores in California . They moved their merchantile store from Ballarat to Rhyolite Emporium. Now that all is left is some walls, but the facade if you have a good imagination this store must have been grand.

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    Rhyolite School House ~1909-1919

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 29, 2011

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    This is the second school house built at the cost of $20,000, but sadly by the time they finished it, the town was in decline, so only half of the students were attending it. It consisted of three classrooms on the first floor and one classroom and auditorium on the second floor. It must have been grand. With some imagination you can almost see children seated at there desks busily learning reading and writing. The school house remained in service until 1919.

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    Merchantile Store ~ 1906

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 29, 2011

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    Erected in 1906, but was moved during the boom of Transvaal, then after that mining town was abandoned I am assuming it was moved to Beatty to protect it, but was eventually moved back to Rhyolite to hopefully be restored.

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Rhyolite Things to Do

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