Rhyolite Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by blueskyjohn
  • Things to Do
    by blueskyjohn
  • Things to Do
    by blueskyjohn

Most Recent Things to Do in Rhyolite

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    Goldwell Open Air Museum - The Last Supper

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 29, 2011

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    Began in 1984 when Belgian scultor Albert Szukalski created The Last Supper using live models to sculpt in actual size, wrapped them in fabric soaked in wet plaster until the plaster was almost set, then they could slip out. It was originally placed up by the train depot, but was moved to its present day location. Since then, additional artist have created numberous sculptures placed around the last supper. Since his death in 2000, the museum is non profit to care for his work and that of the others.

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    Tom Kelly's Bottle House~1906

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 29, 2011

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    This three bedroom house was built in 1906 using bottles that were thrown away saloon bottles. Talk about going green even during 1906;) Mr. Kelley only built it to be raffled off. The Bennet family won and lived in it until 1914. Then in 1925 the Paramount Studios wanted to make a movie here and wanted to use the bottle house so they repaired it. Yet from 1925 to 1936 the house remained vacant but taken care of. From 1936 to 1954 Mr. Murphy owned it and had a museum in it for tourist. From 1954 to 1989 the Thompson family lived here. From 1990 the BLM started managing it. Since then caretakers would stay for months at a time in the 5th wheelers. Now up the road is a caretaker of the whole place and they have cameras to keep an protective eye on it.

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    RAILROAD STATION

    by mtncorg Written Sep 5, 2006

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    At the town's height, three railroads came into Rhyolite. The train station is evidence of what once was. After the rail lines left town, the station tried to hang on as a part-time this or that but now it simply stands as a fenced-off mute note to history.

    Abandoned train station at Rhyolite No more tracks.  No more trains.
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    MINES

    by mtncorg Written Sep 5, 2006

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    Gold is the reason the town sprang up, but the strike didn't last long You can visit some of the old mine entrances though you can't go into the old mines since you might not come out. This mine entrance is on the eastern edge of the old townsite. Recent 'advances' in mining technologly have allowed an Australian mining company to come in and rip apart the neighboring hills in true Appalachian style - the strip mining technique is very obvious as you approach Rhyolite from the nearest town, Beatty, to the east. The area now also boasts two main employers - the mining company and the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste facilities.

    Entrance to an old mine at Rhyolite There is gold in them hills!
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    BOTTLE HOUSE

    by mtncorg Written Sep 5, 2006

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    Let's see... miners and alcohol kind of go together, right? That means there might be a lot of empty bottles around. What a great and unique source of building material! Much cheaper to use the bottles than to side your house with wood where there is none. There are other bottle houses in Nevada, but none are as well-known as this one. The house is still kept up by the BLM. Originally built in the 1920's after most everyone was gone - good reason to put all of those empty bottles to good use! - the house can sometimes be visited though not on the weekday I was there.

    Another use for all of those empties! Visiting Hours? Clsoer view of the bottles from the closed gate
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  • Behind the Fence

    by tmauceri Written Jul 22, 2006

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    The Bottle House is a bit amazing, but the chain link fence surrounding it detracts mihgtily fromn the sense of being there. The lack of tourist trap clutter leads you into a fantasy visit and makes it easy to imagine a bustling town in the place of this empty space. It was one of three such houses, built by a 70-something man. True to the heritage of our Wild West, there were lots of bottles, both from the Red Light district's many bars and brothels, and from the more upstanding citizenry's patent medicines. ZThe fence is a shame and makes decent photos very difficult, but the sad truth is that our fine upstanding visitors woujld no doubt rip the bottles out of their mortar so that they could be brought home as soveneirs.

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  • The Last Citizen

    by tmauceri Written Jul 22, 2006

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    On a balmy 106-degree day, the jackrabbit resting against the bleached pillar of the ruin remained oblivious to the intrusion of strangers. Born and raised a true city slicker, the thought of a rattlesnake standing as a hidden sentry in the burnt bush nearby prevented a closeup shot.

    Solid sentry or last citizen? Bleached pillars
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  • Knock Knock Knocking

    by tmauceri Written Jul 22, 2006

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    This may not be Heaven's Door, but it stands solid and strong on a building that was built and soon abandoned nearly a century ago. It seems odd to come across this strong impediment in a place where no one lives, no one works and there is noting inside to protect.

    Door to Rhyolite

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  • Movie Backdrop

    by tmauceri Written Jul 22, 2006

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    I saw the movie "The Island" only 2 weeks after visiting Rhyolite. This ruin sets the tone for desolation and environmental harshness in that film. I wonder what type of world the construction crew might have imagined their building woujld see 100 years later?

    Nature's wastermelon bite
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  • Last Way Out of Town

    by tmauceri Written Jul 22, 2006

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    Coming across this statue in the open air museum on the outskirts of Rhyolite adds a strong sense of the surreal to your visit. It woujld be striking enough anywhere, but in this setting of a town with ghosts on thes deserted streets of dirt, it brings a sense of awe and unease.

    Last Ride Out One of the Twelve
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  • Cook Bank Building

    by in4ik Written Oct 13, 2004

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    Anyway, Mr. Cook came from Goldfield, Nevada to Rhyolite in hopes of opening another Cook Bank. He started with a small building on Golden St., and it did not take long for him to decide he needed a much larger place to conduct business.

    This one cost him over $90,000 to build! It was the largest building in Rhyolite. No matter where you stood you could see the Cook Bank Building. This building had marble floors imported from Italy, mahogany woodwork, electric lights, telephone and inside plumbing! Well, they had just everything you could put into a modern building. It was almost ahead of its time.

    The First Rhyolite National Bank eventually absorbed the Cook Bank and took over the first floor. The United States Post Office was in the basement and operated there until 1919. It was the last business to close in Rhyolite. And that was quite a task for the Post Office, because they were selling parts of the Cook Bank Building in 1910!

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  • Porter Brothers Store

    by in4ik Written Oct 13, 2004

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    This building had large plate glass windows so that you could see everything the store offered for sale. And they sold everything! Except alcoholic beverages of course!

    This was the second store that the Porter Brothers built in Rhyolite. This one had a basement, large show windows, and sometimes they used the first floor for dances. By the standards of the day, it was an extremely large store.

    One of my favorite stories here concerned one of the Porter Boys and we'll call her Mrs. X to save embarrassment. Anyway, Mrs. X walked her little poodle everyday right by the Porter Brothers Store. And everyday the dog would take a leak on the middle post of the store. Being tired of cleaning up the mess, one of the Porter boys hooked a copper wire and a battery to the center post. Well, I imagine you can guess what happened next. It really was a sight to see that ball of fur yipping and running down Golden St. with Mrs. X behind it. No, the poodle was not injured, but it never, ever, came near the Porter Store again.

    The Porter Brothers also owned a warehouse and lumber yard in Rhyolite. They were very popular, but were also known as practical jokers. If anything strange but harmless happened in the town, it was a good bet that one of the Porter Brothers was behind it.

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  • Tom Kelly's Bottle House

    by in4ik Written Oct 13, 2004

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    This was one of three bottle houses to be built in Rhyolite. It took Tom Kelly 5 1/2 months to complete this house. Most of the bottles used were Adulphous Busch, (You know, it's known as Budweiser today!) anyway, there are a few patent medicine bottles that were used also.

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    Trains are nomore

    by sabe Written Apr 22, 2003

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    The station house is still there, but the tracks are gone since long time ago. Rhyolite used to populate a lot of people and you can clearly see the traces..even so on the map since one of the roads that we planned to take..weren't there either. Maybe it left with the tracks?

    Centralstation! Next; Nowhere!

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    Overybury Building Ruins 1907

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 29, 2011

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    Built in 1907 at the cost of $45,000. It was considered very modern since it had electric lights and indoor plumbing.

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Rhyolite Things to Do

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