Fun things to do in Nevada

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Nevada

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    Grand Canyon

    by Madasabull Written Dec 20, 2013

    We took a day out to see the Grand Canyon, and although the weather looked great, when we got to the viewing park to the Sky Walk, it was thick cloud and rain, and even snow on the ground. It was weird, and sad too because it was closed because of the weather.

    After that long drive up to the top, it was back down again, but we thought we would see it a different way, from the bottom. We were going to follow the river down as part of our road trip, so we weren't that upset, as we though we would still get to see some parts of it.

    But if we had booked our trip with the sole purpose of seeing the Grand Canyon, and not been able to, that would have been bad, and Im sure there were many people who were not too happy. But what can you do, if the weather is bad, it's bad. We still had a great day out, as we weren't relying on others to drive us everywhere, and could just do our own thing.

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    Hoover Dam

    by Madasabull Written Dec 20, 2013

    Hoover Dam is just 30 miles away from Las Vegas, and as we were staying for a week here, we though we get out for the day to see it.

    Construction started in 1930 and it took 5 years before it was completed. About 5000 people worked on the dam at any one time, and this helped Las Vegas to boom, because before the dam construction, Las Vegas wasnt much more than a sleepy town, but now with the population created with the dam construction it's booming.

    We had a great day out, but going over the dam took some time, due to police checks for bombs and other terror threats. Cars where checked underneath and passengers where profiled.

    Coming back over the dam later in the day to get back to Vegas, it took 4 hours. The traffic was blocked solid for hours, and we were so glad we had a full tank of fuel, plenty to drink and eat, and were not in any great rush.

    In fact, we were quite relaxed about it. We sat there with the windows open, cracking sunflower seeds that had bought a great big bag of.

    We were tired though, and were glad to get back to the hotel. So, make sure you always travel with lots of supplies like water, food, and fuel.

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    Mojave Desert

    by Madasabull Updated Dec 19, 2013

    Visiting the hottest place in America, Death Valley in the Mojave Desert, has to be experienced to be believed fully.

    It was hard to imagine such nothingness, I mean Death Valley look, well, dead, and you couldn't help but think about all those poor people who, when searching for a better life, came across this place instead.

    But it still became an area of mining, Borax mining, gold and silver prospectors holes (actually I better call them digs), could be seen for miles in all directions. We will always find what we need, in the most inhospitable of places if we have to or if there is money to be made.

    A great drive around here, and there are visitors places toilets, as there are not many trees to hide behind.

    But the Mojave Desert is huge, and has a lot more going on than sand and heat, Las Vegas for instance is far from just sand and heat, and check my other reviews of things to do in Nevada, and you see they are all pretty much things to do in the Mojave Desert.

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    Welcome to Las Vegas Sign

    by Yaqui Updated Dec 1, 2013

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    This historical landmark use to greet all those entering Vegas from the south traveling on the strip. Now, it attracts those who seek out the photo opportunity of capturing a unique icon. The sign was the brain child of Betty Willis and Ted Rogich and erected in 1959.

    Traffic is still very busy, so please be careful. They have thankfully added a parking area. Not a lot of spaces, but at least the area is fenced off and gives visitors a much safer area to enjoy the historical piece of history. Hey, you might even have a Elvis sighting;).

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    Ichthyosaurus Park and a Ghost Town

    by DSwede Updated Mar 30, 2012

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    They first appeared in the Trassic seas 250 million years ago. Ichthyosaurus were called fish lizards because they had evolved from reptiles, but could swim like fish. Ichthyosaurus were able to move easily through water because they were streamlined.

    The ichthyosaurus found in the Berlin-Ichthyosaurus State Park are some of the largest in the world, between 2 and 50 feet in length. (1 to 16 meters)

    ~~~~

    Also here is the ghost town of Berlin. Berlin began in the 1860's and became a ghost in 1911. There are several buildings still standing and in quite good condition.

    Prices, facilities and open hours are listed in the website below.
    Access and visitation is limited in the winter (November 15th to March 15th), and is available only with advanced reservation during the winter.

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    CATHEDRAL GORGE STATE PARK

    by mtncorg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Slashed into the hillsides just west of US 93 near Panaca are the eroded gullies of Cathedral Gorge. Unlike the sandstone pink flutes and hoodoos found at Cedar Breaks and Bryce Canyon due east of here, Cathedral Gorge is composed of muted tan badlands-like clay formations resulting from an ancient lakebed being uplifted and then subsequent erosion forming the flutes, columns and gullies found today. The main entrance to the park is almost opposite the road going east off US 93 to Panaca. Here you come past a regional visitor center to a picnic area built in the 1930's by the CCC and a nice campground with 22 sites and showers available. From the picnic area, a trail goes up the main eroded gully eventually coming up onto the canyon rim at the Miller Point Overlook, which can be accessed off US 93 a few miles north of the main entrance road. Entry into the park is $4 and camping is about $14. Cathedral Gorge was one of the first four State Parks to be established in Nevada, dating back to 1935.

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    RUBY MOUNTAINS

    by mtncorg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Another quintessential Great Basin range: long in length - 100 miles, thin in width - 10 miles, steep face on one side - east; and gentler on the other side - west. The Rubys are one of the wetter basin ranges giving them a wide diversity of life. The southe end of the rans is porous limestone which gives rise to hundreds of springs at the mountain's base forming the Ruby Marshes - a birder's paradise. Trails run throughout the range with the 43 mile long Ruby crest trail being the best known. The range is just south of Elko, so see my 'Elko' tips for more on this fine range.

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    LAMOILLE CANYON

    by mtncorg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Set among the 'Alps of Nevada' - the Rubies; Lamoille Canyon is the 'Yosemite of Nevada'. Teh canyon is a large classic glacial valley beginning atop the Ruby Mountain Crest and swinging down to the west in glorious fashion. This is the heart of recreation in the Ruby range. A 12 mile road goes from the canyon mouth to the 8800 foot/2667 meter level where trails take off. Aspen glades run the length. Babbling streams . You are a long ways from the Strip. This is another Nevada.

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    BOUNDARY PEAK

    by mtncorg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Beating out Wheeler Peak by a mere 77 feet/23 meters, Boundary Peak is Nevada's highest mountain at 13140 feet/3982 meters high. Lying on the Californian border - hence the name, the peak is the northern bastion of one of the greatest of all Great Basin ranges, the White Mountains. Most of the range lies in California, in other words, they lie in other California pages that I have yet to create:-) Boundary Peak shares the same ridgeline with the more dramatic Mt Montgomery - one mile away and 300 feet/91 meters higher. Some people think of Boundary Peak as simply part of Mt Montgomery.

    You can climb Boundary from all sorts of directions, but most do so from the east. The peak is doable in one long day - 10 miles round trip/10-14 hours/4600 feet of elevation gain. Your approach is over dusty roads through dessicated desert into the pinyon-forested Trail Canyon. You slowly make your way past the few cows that call the lower reaches, summer vacation, and get onto talus and scree. I would recommend John Hart's "Hiking the Great Basin" which is published by the Sierra Club. Standing atop Boundary Peak, you can look down on Queen Valley to the west, some 6300 feet/1909 below! Mt Montgomery is not too far away, as well - about one hour, if you haven't had enough :-}

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    • Mountain Climbing

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    Valley of Fire State Park II.

    by pfsmalo Written Sep 16, 2010

    This being my 2nd visit, and as I hadn't picked up any brochures,I went and paid my dues ($3 x2) at the Park Office, as coming from Overton there is no booth on the way in. Went out and visited the White Domes trail and then the well named "Petroglyph Canyon" trail. Roughly an hour's walk there and back shows up many of the Fremont Indian petroglyphs on the walls, but keep your eyes peeled.

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    Las Vegas Strip on NYE

    by maemae11 Written Jun 19, 2010

    We had a once in a lifetime experience on our New Year's trip 2010, I say once in a lifetime because I had fun but I won't ever do it again. There were a TON of people. Definitely not a time to get wasted. At times we had to elbow our way through the crowds. Pretty interesting though, glad I went. I'll leave more comments about some of the shows, but the ones we went to were Gregory Popovich's Pet Comedy Theater, and The Variety Show, both at V Theater.

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    Las Vegas

    by Robmj Written Sep 19, 2009

    There is much more to Las Vegas than gambling but it definitely is the "Gambling capital of the World". Vegas bills itself as the entertainment capital and I guess thats fair enough, there is absolutely loads to see and do. It is an internationally renowned major resort city for gambling, shopping, fine dining, and entertainment. Attractions in Las Vegas include theme parks, roller coasters, museums, national parks, great golf courses and more. You can also easily get married in one of the many themed chapels.

    It is a city built out of the desert, established in 1905, it now has a population of just under 1.9 million people and was the fastest growing city in America during the 20th century. The city's tolerance for various forms of adult entertainment earned it the title of Sin City, and this image has made Las Vegas a popular setting for films and television programs. Today, however it is a major family destination and a huge retirement settlement.

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    Hoover Dam

    by Robmj Updated Sep 19, 2009

    The Hoover Dam is a major source of flood control, irrigation and electrical power in the Southwest and was, for several years, the largest dam in the world. It is located in Boulder canyon and was renamed the Hoover Dam in 1947 to recognise the input that President Hoover played in its creation.

    Today you can drive over it between the Arizona and Nevada borders along highway route 93 and take tours through it if you wish. It is an awe inspiring sight looking towards the dam from downstream.

    Lake Mead which was created as a result of the dam is now a major recreational spot with fishing, boating, swimming, hiking, camping and sight seeing all available from this area.

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    Hoover Dam Markers

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 4, 2009

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    These are all lined up next to eachother, so make time to look at them. From Left to Right!

    Hoover Dam

    Inscription.
    A modern civil engineering wonder of the United States
    One of seven selected by the American Society of Civil Engineers
    1955

    They Died to Make the Desert Bloom

    The United States of America will continue to remember that many who toiled here found their final rest while engaged in the building of this dam.

    The United States of America will continue to remember the services of all who labored to clothe with substance the plans of those who first visioned the building of this dam.

    They Laboured that Millions might see a Brighter Day

    The plaque reads: In Memory of our Fellowmen who lost their lives in the construction of this dam. Erected 1935 by The Boulder City Central Labor Council.

    Dr. Elwood Mead

    Inscription. Commissioner, Bureau of Reclamation, Department of the Interior, 1924-1936 whose life-time work culminated in construction of the Boulder Canyon project creating Lake Mead, named in his honor.

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    Hoover Dam

    by Yaqui Written Jul 4, 2009

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    Located in Black Canyon spanning the Colorado River between Arizona and Nevada, about 30 miles southeast of Las Vegas, Nevada Hoover Dam is a testament to this country's grit to build a dam of monolithic heights during the depression no less and within some of the most inhospitable weather conditions. Thousands of men and their families flocked to this area looking for work. They found it within Black Canyon and along the beautiful Colorado River. Within five years time they accomplished in building the largest dam of its time. Still to this day, Hoover Dam still stands as a monument to those hardy souls who suffered much to accomplish their task. It is a National Historic Landmark and has been rated by the American Society of Civil Engineers as one of America's Seven Modern Civil Engineering Wonders.

    Hoover Dam weights more than 6,600,000 tons and it is 726.4 feet from foundation rock to the roadway on the crest of the dam. The towers and ornaments on the parapet rise 40 feet above the crest.

    Hoover Dam is a concrete arch-gravity type, in which the water load is carried by both gravity action and horizontal arch action. The maximum water pressure at the base of the dam is 45,000 pounds per square foot.

    There are three and one-quarter million cubic yards of concrete. There are 4,360,000 cubic yards of concrete in the dam, powerplant and appurtenant works. This much concrete would build a monument 100 feet square and 2-1/2 miles high; would rise higher than the 1,250-foot-tall Empire State Building if placed on an ordinary city block; or would pave a standard highway 16 feet wide, from San Francisco to New York City.

    The first concrete for the dam was placed on June 6, 1933, and the last on May 29, 1935. Approximately 160,000 cubic yards of concrete were placed in the dam per month. Peak placements were 10,462 cubic yards in one day (including some concrete placed in the intake towers and powerplant), and slightly over 275,000 cubic yards in one month.

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