Local traditions and culture in New Hampshire

  • The little tour was interesting and informative
    The little tour was interesting and...
    by Pawtuxet
  • Karen and I did our share of tasting
    Karen and I did our share of tasting
    by Pawtuxet
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    shop
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Most Viewed Local Customs in New Hampshire

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    Moonlight Meadery

    by Pawtuxet Updated Aug 12, 2012

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    Not far from Hudson, NH where our son is living we found a MEADERY! One of the oldest drinks in the world... this meadery has a small tasting room and tours which include free glasses. Their mead can be bought in a number of flavors from Blueberry to Coffee. It's made from local honey and local fruits (where possible). They are very creative in their assortment of flavors from fairly dry to quite sweet. You can also buy plain old fashioned mead which is very nice as well. We enjoyed our visit and carried away a half dozen bottles between us. Brought one to a dinner party when we got home and they raved about it.
    These entrepeneures are now distributing their mead to over a dozen states and they are still growing. Look for it and take a drive to New Hampshire - such a beautiful state.

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    • Wine Tasting
    • Road Trip

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    Bear Bells

    by german_eagle Written Jul 4, 2009

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    We were told there are (black) bears in the White Mountains. To our disappointment we didn't see one. Not that I'd want to get too close to one!

    Anyway, the balcony of our rental apartment had a nice little bell that one can ring when the bears get close. As far as I know they don't like the sound and run ... True or not, but it's a nice story for the kids.

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    state symbols

    by davecallahan Updated Apr 5, 2007

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    the state bird is the Purple Finch.

    the state animal is the White Tail Deer.

    the state flower is the Purple Lilac.

    state nickname is "Granite State" in reference to the fine granite quarries and to the state's
    steadfastness in hard times.

    state motto is: "Live Free or Die"

    the state seal shows a ship in the shipyard indicating Portsmouth shipbuilding and commerce; cranberry leaves surround the seal indicating strength and vitality.

    the state flag is the state seal on a blue field

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    Always a dog around the lake

    by Pawtuxet Written Dec 9, 2006

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    My sons have loved Lake Winnepesaukee since the first moment they saw it...and the first time one of them fell off the dock. So many great sunny days spent with good friends. The Lake is just that kind of place.

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    • Travel with Pets
    • Beaches
    • Family Travel

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    Tipping

    by Helga67 Updated Dec 7, 2006

    Tipping is more or less compulsory. In restaurants, waiters expect around 10% to 20%, as do taxi drivers, while porters and bellboys anticipate around 1 or 2 USD per piece of luggage. You are not expected to tip in fast-food restaurants or cinemas.

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    Parking pass

    by Helga67 Written Dec 6, 2006

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    If you are driving the White Mountain Trail and want to park somewhere for hiking, you need to buy a parking pass. Passes for more than one day can be bought at the visitors center. Day passes are available at parking areas along the trail.

    There you will find a dispenser box with envelopes. Take an envelope and tear the daily recreation pass stub from the envelope. Place the daily pass stub inside your vehicle on the dashboard. Place 3 USD in the envelope and deposit it in the fee tube.

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    • National/State Park

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    Whirlygigs, birdhouses, and Cape Cod swing

    by Pawtuxet Written Sep 25, 2006

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    You can find these roadside businesses scattered throughout New England, but moreso in New Hampshire and Cape Cod. If you are lucky you will find a man who makes the whimsical art from scratch and creates his own design. Unfortunately there isn't much money in that, so we now see people selling things which come from a kit. However some of the whirlygigs are colorful and fun...and who could resist spending time in a Cape Cod swing?

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    • Arts and Culture
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    Old Home Days

    by gilescorey Written Jul 17, 2005

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    New Hampshire towns celebrate "Old Home Day", usually during the Summer. It's a homegrown celebration of "the town", but it's origins are somewhat more stark.

    At the turn of the twentieth century, most of these small towns lost population. With few job opportunities to offer its children, most youth would travel away for college or work - and stay away. So, "Old Home Day"(the town being the childrens' "old home") was a sort of giant reunion - and an attempt to woo the kids back.

    Population loss is certainly not a problem, nowadays - quite the opposite, in fact. But, the tradition continues. Keep an eye out for "Old Home Day" as you travel. It might be "Candia Old Home Day", or "Deering Old Home Day", but each one will offer small town fun - candy apples, and cow chips(a field is divided in a grid with chalk, numbered and a cow is set out to "crap". If she craps on your square, you win!). Can't beat that, can you?

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    You in a Subaru

    by gilescorey Written Jul 17, 2005

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    The hottest car you can have in New Hampshire is a Subaru.

    This makes sense, actually. Pragmatic New Englanders driving a versatile, economical vehicle that's good in the snow - now, throw on a ski rack, and you're a rock star.

    Us kids bought this Subaru for my Mom. She was in tears, "I can't believe I have a SUBARU!". It's the New Hampshire Porsche, I guess.

    Volvos, Saabs, and VW's are runner ups.

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    Celebrations & Events in New Hampshire

    by deecat Updated Jun 5, 2005

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    The people of New Hampshire are fun-loving individuals who love to celebrate their culture, religion, politics, and holidays.

    Although I did not see this, I heard about it from other tourists who had Scottish backgrounds!
    Each year, 35,000 people attend a 3-day festival of Scottish culture. Scotch-Irish immigrants were among the earliest settlers in New Hampshire, and this celebration gives their descendants an opportunity to celebrate their rich traditions. They have contests such as a CABER THROW (a Caber is a huge pole thrown in athletic contests). They also conduct feats of strength. But, perhaps MUSIC plays the biggest role in the celebration. There are many BAGPIPE BANDS. There are about 60 Scottish clans there, and they are more than anxious to help visitors learn about their particular clan.
    There is a popular WINTER CARNIVAL held at DARTMOUTH COLLEGE in February. At this festival, SNOW SCULPTURE is the most favorite activity. Groups of college students work for days to create these huge snow figures. Many of them are as tall as 30 feet!

    3COUNTRY FAIRS have been celebrated for years; it's been a harvest tradition for generations. Here they have vegetable and livestock contests, rides on the midway, games, and wild nighttime fireworks displays.

    The PUMPKIN FESTIVAL in Keene is held the Saturday before HALLOWEEN. They try to set records for the most lighted jack-o'lanterns along the town's Main Street. They succeeded in the year 2000!

    Perhaps the biggest event, however, is THE LEAGUE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE CRAFTSMEN'S FAIR which is held each August in NEWBURY at Mt. Sunapee St. Park since 1933. It lasts for nine days and features the work of more than 200 artists and craftspeople. As a visitor, you can make your own crafts at hands-on demonstrations.

    This is just a few of the many wonderful cultural events that New Hampshirites celebrate each year.

    Related to:
    • Music
    • Arts and Culture
    • Festivals

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    Politics is Important in New Hampshire

    by deecat Updated Jun 5, 2005

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    "We're so passionate about our primary. We believe we're one of the last places where, without spending a fortune, you can establish yourself as a viable candidate for President of the United States." Donna Sytek, Speaker of the New Hampshire House of Representatives

    For New Hampshirites, government plays an important role in their lives. They have a large voice in choosing the President of the United States.

    Since 1952, New Hampshire voters have voted before other states. The State holds its presidential primary election in early March ;whereas, other states hold theirs later in the year. And, candidates who do well in New Hampshire's primary usually do well across the nation.

    New Hampshirites also cast the first votes for President in November. Citizens in the tiny town of Dixville Notch begin voting just after midnight on election day. Hart's Location also opens its polls at midnight.

    In addition, New Hamshirites govern their towns in an unusual way. Once each year, towns across the state hold town meetings on the second Tuesday in March. They've been doing this since the 1600s! At this time, they elect town officials and vote on local matters.

    The photo is of Franklin Pierce who was the only US president from New Hampshire. He served during the tensions between the North and South. He was a firm supporter of the US government, but he supported the South's pro-slavery stance.

    Photo from New Hamshire archives

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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  • Vanity Plates

    by ElaineCatherine Written May 5, 2005

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    Did You know that New Hampshire has a greater percentage of Vanity plates than any other state in the US?

    Reason.. they are really inexpensive here! It does seem that most everyone has one!

    It's fun to read them while driving on the road. But even more fun to have one on my own car!

    Just for fun check these out: http://www.4u2c.net/vanityplates/

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  • The Old Man in the Mountain

    by ElaineCatherine Written Jan 20, 2005

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    He's gone now, his face forever erased from the mountain in May, 2003! And all of New Hampshire was stunned and devestated. It was so common for people to go up north just to say 'hi' to him. He's been such a part of our culture for ever. He's our state symbol, he's on our coins, he's on our road signs. It seemed that he truly symbolized New Hampshire.

    He's gone but his former place may be viewed from Interstate 93, northbound, in Franconia State Park from several cutout parking areas. The area is well marked and you will have no trouble locating the viewing areas. Southbound on Interstate 93, take Exit 2 into the Canon Mt Tramway parking lot and follow the signs for the "Old Man viewing area".

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    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Archeology

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  • The Old Man in the Mountain

    by ElaineCatherine Written Jan 20, 2005

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    He's gone now, his face forever erased from the mountain in May, 2003! And all of New Hampshire was stunned and devestated. It was so common for people to go up north just to say 'hi' to him. He's been such a part of our culture for ever. He's our state symbol, he's on our coins, he's on our road signs. It seemed that he truly symbolized New Hampshire.

    He's gone but his former place may be viewed from Interstate 93, northbound, in Franconia State Park from several cutout parking areas. The area is well marked and you will have no trouble locating the viewing areas. Southbound on Interstate 93, take Exit 2 into the Canon Mt Tramway parking lot and follow the signs for the "Old Man viewing area".

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    cool off your feet....

    by richiecdisc Written Dec 8, 2003

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    One thing I love to do is cool my feet off after a long hike. After nine hours of strenuous walking in the same hot boots, it is a real joy to finally take them off and dip your feet in the icy waters of a mountain stream. You'll hate putting your boots back on, but the rest of the hike will be much nicer after you treat your feet to this simple pleasure.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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