Tabernacle Things to Do

  • Village Blacksmith
    Village Blacksmith
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    Indian Ann's Grave
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Most Recent Things to Do in Tabernacle

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    Conte Farms - "Pick Your Own"

    by KiKitC Written Aug 22, 2008

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    Conte Farms, at 299 Flyatt Road in Tabernacle, New Jersey, is a "pick-your own" farm and orchard. If you happen to miss the large fields, parking lot, or one of numerous signs, the windmill in front of it's store should get your attention.

    Crops include: apples, blueberries, flowers, pumpkins, strawberries and pumpkins. Seasonally, the farm offers pumpkin patch-pick in the field and a corn maze
    Open: Monday thru Sunday 7am to 6 pm
    Pick Your Own Schedule:
    Strawberry June 3 thru June 20
    Blueberry July 1 thru July 30
    Apples September 18, thru October 17
    Pumpkins Oct. 1, thru October 31
    Combo Apples & Pumpkins September 29, thru October 17

    CORN MAZE (6acres) Starting September 15th Large Variety of field grown mums.

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    Site of Schoolhouse

    by KiKitC Written Aug 22, 2008

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    Site of Schoolhouse
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    Old Union School, as it was referred to, sat at the crossroads of Indian Mills-Tabernacle Road in 1856, in front of the Junior OUAM. It was demolished in 1910, when a two room school was built alongside.

    Nothing remains of the Old Union School, that stood on this site. This one room schoolhouse is recorded as having serious drainage problems, such that the young schoolboys dropped planks of wood across the thresholds to keep from sinkage into the "mud up to their knickers."

    This school was closed when a better two room school was built next to it. This two room school was heated by wood stoves, but the outdoor water pump would often freeze, and students would have to carry water from the nearby store.

    This two room school was moved from this lcoation in 1936, and has since been expanded and acts today as the Tabernacle Intermediate School.

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    Tabernacle Methodist Church

    by KiKitC Written Aug 22, 2008

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    This Methodist Church, was built in 1880 under the guidance of Rev. George Reeves in Tabernacle, New Jersey. It has been the beginning of many ministers' careers.

    This white steepled church, on Carranza Road in tiny Tabernacle, began with a membership of 50. Though the membership has grown sustantially since then, it still retains the old town charm and welcoming.

    Before the establishment of a volunteer fire company, the church bell was rung as a fire warning and the whole community answered it's call. In WWII, the bell was tolled for air raid drills.

    Now, the bell chimes 33 times times every Sunday, to commemorate the years the Jesus Christ lead an earthly life.

    Thanks to the Tabernacle Historical Society, we know the first couple to exchange their wedding vows in this church were Bea and Raymond Worrell in 1938.

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    Tabernacle Town Hall

    by KiKitC Written Aug 22, 2008

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    In 1874, the Order of Saint Mechanics built the Junior Order of United American Mechanics Hall, OUAM Hall for Short, which today is Taberncale, New Jersey's Town Hall. The history of this building is quite interesting.

    On the day we visited Tabernacle, the Tabernacle Historical Society was holding it's annual "Strawberry Social." It gave us a great opportunity to meet the members of the Tabernacle Historical Society, who were more than happy to share their knowledge of the Town Hall and the town's history. We were also glad to make a donation and receive a copy of the "Historic Tabernacle A Pictorial Tour" booklet compiled by the Historical Society.

    There were seventeen charter male members of the Juniors, as they were called. They allowed many community events to be held in their hall. The Methodist Church held dinner, and "medicine shows" took place on the first floor. On the second floor of this building was the "Paraphernalia Room" which among all things had a stuffed goat that only members could ride.

    In 1920, Mr. Al Jones had an unusually large cranberry crop, and rented the first floor and the basement for storage and berry sorting!This unfortunately led to a fire, which destroyed township records stored in the basement...a great inconvenience to all the residents that had to write to Trenton for copies of important records.

    After World War II, membership dwindled and it became impractical to keep the hall. The Juniors voted by unanimous decision in 1960, to donate the the hall to the Township of Tabernacle for use as it's town hall.

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    Home of Gilbert W. Knight

    by KiKitC Written Aug 22, 2008

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    Just doors down from the intersection that is the town of tabernacle, New Jersey, stands the home of Gilbert W. Knight, a blacksmith that helped shape this town in the 19th century.

    This home, which is now called the Pepper House, was once called the Knight House. It's first owner was Gilbert W. Knight, a GAR veteran of the 23rd Regiment, Burlington County. Knight also acted as the town's blacksmith.

    After Knight, Sam and Clara Scott were the owners. The Scotts had an ice cream shop near the house, and at one time, a filling station. The, Arthur "Skimmer" and Clara Pepper became the owners,a nd were the last inhabitants of this quaint home.

    The Tabernacle Historical Society has restored this building to it's original charm, as Knight had built it.

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    Friendship School

    by KiKitC Written Aug 22, 2008

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    Friendship School

    Now sitting on the grounds of the Tabernacle Intermediate School, facing Flyatt Road, this one room schoolhouse has had an interesting past.

    This little schoolhouse once sat near the railroad crossing called High Crossing, not far from Tabernacle, in Woodland Township. A lack of pupils led to the abandonment of the school in 1918. It was then used for many purposes, such as a goat barn and chicken coop, and was badly vandalized before the Tabernacle Historical Society was given permission to move it to it's new location for restoration in 1976.

    After it was moved, a township employee accidentally backed into the schoolhouse with a truck...but didn't push it past the salvageable point.

    Now, on the first Saturdays from April to October, 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm, you may visit this restored schoolhouse, and experience what a one room schoolhouse prior to World War I was like. No detail is missing...except the recorded teacher, Mr. William Reynolds, who the children were afraid would use his crutches to punish them. (He never did, though capital punshment was legal then)

    For a special appointment, you may contact the Tabernacle Historical Society at 609-268-0473.

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    Kemble Inn

    by KiKitC Written Aug 22, 2008

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    By the intersection of Carranza Road and Medford Lakes road, stands an historic inn, the Kemble Inn, built in 1845.

    Charles S. Kemble founded this inn in 1845. Apart from being an innkeeper, he was also a farmer and area blacksmith. He served as a member of the NJ House of Assembly from 1855-1859. Later he became the Burlington County Sheriff, but died in office in 1869.

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    Tabernacle Cemetary

    by KiKitC Written Aug 22, 2008

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    Tabernacle Cemetery
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    By the corner of Carranza and Medford Roads, the historic town of Tabernacle was deeded this land by townfolk for the use of a cemetary.

    In the mid 1700s, iron, charcoal and glass industries were aplenty in the south Jersey pine barrens. The Speedwell Furnace, opened in 1785 by Benjamin Randolph led to the eventual founding of Tabernacle Township.

    The crossroads at Tabernacle became an area for local commerce and meeting. A schoolhouse, church, general store, blacksmith and inn were built.

    In 1805, William and Sarah Wilkens deeded this land to be used by the residents of Tabernacle "As Long as the Wheels of Time Shall not Cease to Roll."

    A trip to this cemetary is truly a trip into history. The grave of Indian Ann sits here, as well as civil war soldiers. This is a great starting place for geneologists of Southern Jersey families.

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    Visit the Town's Blacksmith

    by KiKitC Written Aug 22, 2008

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    Village Blacksmith
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    By the intersection of Carranza Road and Medford Lakes road, once stood the site of the town blacksmith shop.

    In the mid 1700s, iron, charcoal and glass industries were aplenty in the south Jersey pine barrens. The Speedwell Furnace, opened in 1785 by Benjamin Randolph led to the eventual founding of Tabernacle Township.

    The crossroads at Tabernacle became an area for local commerce and meeting. A schoolhouse, church, general store, blacksmith and inn were built.

    Charles S. Kemble was the blacksmith of the shop that stood on this site, just across from the Kemble Inn. Other blacksmiths known to have practiced here were Gilbert Knight, Henry Allen, and William Cutts.

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    Visit the Last of the Delawares

    by KiKitC Written Aug 22, 2008

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    Indian Ann's Grave

    Indian Ann, the last of the great Delaware (Lenni Lenape) tribe to live in new Jersey, resided here until her death in 1894, at the age of ninety.

    Ann, born in 1804, was the daughter of Chief Lasha (sometimes called Ash) Tamar, and was among a small number of her tribesman that did not accept an invitation to relocate to Oneida Lake, New York.

    Local stories read that Ann met with a local white girl on the Bread and Cheese trail...and shared a lunch by a stream, which now bears a name from this lunch. Ann introduced Mary to her father, who escorted her back to town and recounted the lunch the girls shared to her family. The area, is now called Inawendiwin, a word meaning "friendship", coined by Ann's father.

    It is known that Ann became a reknown basket weaver, and her wares are a treasured Pinelands find. It is not known when she began weaving, or when she met and married her first husband, Peter Green, a former slave. Little is known about how former slaves came to be in this area, it may have been from the famed Underground Railroad, or from a slave camp that was reputed in the area (no evidence has ever been found). It is also not known when or how her first husband died.

    There is more known about Ann's second husband, John Roberts, who served in the Civil War, Company A, 22nd Regiment of Colored Troops. He would have been much her junior, as they married in 1864, when Ann would have been sixty-four years of age. Roberts died in a hospital in Yorktown, Virginia after serving thirteen months in the Union Army.

    After his death, Ann began receiving a pension of $8 a month, increasing to $12 when she was eighty-two. That was considerable income for the time.

    John and Ann lived in a small frame house on Dingletown Road, not far from Indian Mills. There were seven children. Ann lived in this house until her death.

    Ann wore her hair in long thick braids, and smoked a clay pipe. She had a clock that needed winding with a key, but for some reason she was afraid to wind it herself, and often had local children perform this task for her.

    Her grave sits, appropriately, in the Tabernacle Cemetary, not far from the place where she lived. Each Memorial Day, the president of the Tabernacle Historical Society places flowers on her grave...memorial to the last of the Delawares (Lenni Lenape) tribe of the Pinelands and the last in New Jersey.

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    "Tabernacle in the Wilderness"

    by KiKitC Written Aug 22, 2008

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    The "Tabernacle in the Wilderness", established by a Presbyterian missionary named John Brainerd, was primarily for the large Native American contingent in the area.

    This log church sat by the intersection of what is now Carranza and Medford Roads in Tabernacle, NJ. This log church was built in 1778, and served the Native American and white settlers of the area.

    After John Brainerd's death in 1781, the church was used as a Methodist Church and school until 1885. The two acres of land adjacent to the church, was owned by William and Sarah Wilkens, who deeded the land to be used by the town residents for a cemetary.

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