Questa Things to Do

  • Artists at Taos Pueblo
    Artists at Taos Pueblo
    by AlbuqRay
  • Taos Pueblo Church
    Taos Pueblo Church
    by AlbuqRay
  • Taos Pueblo Cemetery and Old Church
    Taos Pueblo Cemetery and Old Church
    by AlbuqRay

Best Rated Things to Do in Questa

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    Walk the Rio Grande Gorge Bridge

    by AlbuqRay Updated Sep 30, 2006

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    The Rio Grande Gorge Bridge is 650 feet above the river, making it the second highest bridge in the national highway system. The best views are from the west side rest area but be sure to walk across the bridge and look down. Or better yet, take a ride on a hot air balloon and get these views.

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    Be at Peace at the Kagyu Mila Guru Stupa

    by AlbuqRay Updated Sep 10, 2006

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    Approaching the Stupa
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    There is a wonderful Tibetan Buddhist stupa just a couple of miles south of the Takoja Retreat Center. It is a quiet, peaceful place for meditation. You may also camp there for $10 per day. Construction of the Kagyu Mila Guru Stupa began in 1992 under the direction of Lama Karma Dorje, resident lama at Kagyu Shenpen Kunchab Center in Santa Fe. Land, money and labor for the stupa came primarily from students of the meditation teacher, Herman Rednick (1902-1985), whose teachings blended Eastern and Western meditation concepts. It was completed in 1995. The 35 foot high stupa contains a small shrine room which has traditionally elaborate images of Chenrezig, Tara, and the Masters of the Kagyu lineage painted on its walls, primarily by Cynthia Moku.

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    Hike Down Into the Rio Grande Gorge

    by AlbuqRay Updated Jul 16, 2010

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    Chiflo Trailhead
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    Chiflo ("chief-low") was once rated an "easy" trail at the Wild Rivers Recreation Area, i.e., 0.5 miles and 320 feet down. It is now called "moderate." I don't even want to think about the hard trails.

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    Santuario de Chimayo - Long a Holy Site

    by AlbuqRay Updated Oct 27, 2006

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    Santuario de Chimayo
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    Chimayo is the first town on the "High Road" from Santa Fe to Taos over the Sangre de Christo Mountains. It is 8 miles east of Espanola on NM-76, then a short jog south. It was founded in 1740 and is the "Lourdes of America." Even before the Spanish, the San Juan Pueblo Indians considered the mud from a hot spring in the area to have healing powers. Today visitors take "Holy Dirt" from a small hole in the floor in a side chapel (the dirt is replaced regularly).

    There are two signs when you arrive. The larger sign says Santuario; skip that turn. It has shops and paid parking except for handicapped. Continue on to the Santuario Parking, which is free and is the back way into the chapel. Don't forget to notice all the homemade wooden crosses that pilgrims have attached to the fence. I recommend you read Kymbanm's truly wonderful tips on Chimayo.

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    Tour Taos Pueblo

    by AlbuqRay Updated Sep 10, 2006

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    Artists at Taos Pueblo
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    This is probably the most famous and certainly the most photographed of the 19 pueblos. They say that it is the oldest continously inhabited community in the USA (built between 1000-1450 A.D.), but Acoma's Sky City may be a contender. A river runs through it...actually it is Red Willow Creek, which provides their drinking water. About 150 (of over 1900) Taos Indians live in adobe homes inside the walls and their traditions dictate that no electricity or running water are allowed there. Taos Pueblo gets LOTS of tourists, so they have to have many rules to preserve their privacy and heritage (see the website or brochure). Regular admission is $10 for adults and $5 per camera. You can get a $2 discount if you are with a group of 3 or more adults. Guided tours start at the St. Geronimo Church but there is also a walking tour map. The Taos Mountain Casino is nearby.

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    Enjoy the Taos Historical District

    by AlbuqRay Updated Sep 11, 2006

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    John Dunn House Shops
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    Taos (from Don Fernando de Taos) was established between 1780 and 1800. It was originally constructed as a Spanish fortified plaza ringed by low adobe buildings. To say the least, this must have made for an interesting dynamic with the long established Taos Pueblo, which is just 2.5 miles away. Even so, it was certainly different from the Jemez Pueblo, where the Spanish made the Jemez Indians move down the valley and took the best spot (now Jemez Springs) for themselves. Also vastly different from Cusco, where they conquered the Incas, tore down their structures and built on their foundations.

    The town grew and became an important center for trade on the Santa Fe Trail. Taos became noted as an artists' colony in the late 19th century and retains that influence and charm to this day. Parking can be a problem but you may use the walking map to find your way around. Don't miss the John Dunn House Shops, a quaint area just northeast of the Plaza.

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    Visit a Traditional New Mexico Cemetery

    by AlbuqRay Updated Jul 16, 2010

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    Beautifully Decorated in Remembrance
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    It was obvious that people cared and remembered when you saw this cemetery in the village of Cerro on the road to the Wild Rivers Recreation Area. If one must rest in peace, this is certainly a fine place to do so.

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    Taos Pueblo

    by kymbanm Written Sep 6, 2006

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    The main pueblo from across the river
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    Taos Pueblo is the most photographed Native American village in the world! It's also the most northern pueblo in New Mexico. As such, they traded in the past with tribes known as the Plains Indians and there is a mingling of those cultures that is different from other pueblos in the state. It's beauty is unparalleled in northern New Mexico.

    The people of Taos call themselves the Tiwa, which is also the name of their language. Tiwa is also spoken by the inhabitants of Isleta, Sandia and Picuris Pueblos. Taos is on of the two pueblos in that state that charge an entrance fee (about $10, but we were a group so we were able to get in for $8). There is also a $5 camera fee. Since this is their land, and there are costs associated with keeping up with visitors, I find these fees quite reasonable myself.

    You enter just past the visitor center and wander past the cemetary and towards the church. There are short gratuity based tours that begin everyso often in front of San Geronimo church. Our guide wasn't that great, but I eavesdropped on other guides and found that there are much better ones out there. It's sort of the luck of the draw. The little tour takes you into the church, to the cemetary and to the main square You are told of history of the land, the people, and current concerns. You also are reminded of rules of the pueblo.

    I found this pueblo so pretty, the people friendly. There are shops in the homes around the square filled with local and regional jewlery, art and music I immediately spied a fry bread vendor and hit her up before her supply of dough was gone :) I usually tour Acoma pueblo a couple of times a year, and not only is Taos larger, it is more vibrant. The river cuts through the side of the pueblo square, and reminds us that water is the life of all native villages. I enjoyed meeting the people of Taos -they told stories, and showed great hospitality to our little group of travelers.

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    Take a Dip in the Black Rock Hot Spring

    by AlbuqRay Updated Sep 10, 2006

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    Two Pools Right on the Rio Grande
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    There are two rocky pools; each will hold 5-6 people. The upper pool temperature is usually around 97-98 F and I believe the water has lithium salts. Your skin may begin to tingle after a few minutes. Both pools can flood if the river is high. This hot spring is close to Taos and relatively easy to reach, so don't expect to be alone. Clothing seems to be optional.

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    Learn How to Grow a Trout

    by AlbuqRay Updated Sep 10, 2006

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    Visitors' Center
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    Red River State Trout Hatchery is also a state park. It is a working hatchery but also has a visitors center and a fishing pond for under 12, over 65 and handicapped (limit is 3 trout). There is also access to the special trout waters on the lower Red River. The visitors center is open 8 AM to 5 PM and you can buy fish food to feed the trout there.

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    Let mother nature give you a warm bath ...

    by kymbanm Written Sep 11, 2006

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    Black Rock springs- By AlbuqRay
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    Many mountain areas in New Mexico have hot springs, and the area around Questa and Taos are not any different. What surprised me was that so few of the regular visitors KNOW about them! Now the locals, they know, enjoy, and might actually share some of their knowledge with you should they choose to ;) I received my insider's knowledge from a book: "Touring New Mexico Hot Springs, A Falcon Guide" by Matt Bischoff.

    I turned my travel companions onto a site called Black Rock Hot Springs in the book, but known to locals as the Arroyo Hondo Hot Springs. There are two pools, and usually lots of people. But two intrepid members of our party woke at the crack of dawn and headed down there hoping for a private soak. Of course there was already one person there :) But the time was enjoyed anyways!

    Directions:
    Take NM522 to Arroyo Hondo and look for CR005. Continue as it becomes a dirt road and cross the bridge over the Rio Grande. Veer to the left after crossing, and look for the parking area near the first hairpin turn. Follow the well defined trail towards the river. You'll see the springs when you are just about on top of them. Strip down and enjoy.

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    Overview of things to do

    by kymbanm Written Sep 6, 2006

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    A Ristra in Taos - By Katmosphere


    Taos Galleries
    Self-guided Taos Artwalk, map is here


    Taos Museums

    Horseback Riding:
    Taos Indian Horse Ranch (Taos) 505-758-3212 1-800-659-3210
    Bitter Creek Guest Ranch (Red River) Bitter Creek Rd 754-2587
    Cieneguilla Stables (Taos) 505-751-2815
    El Rito Horse Farm (El Rito) 505-581-464
    Red River Stables (Red River) 800 East Main St 505-754-1700
    Rio Grande Stables (Taos) 4 Juan-D Martinez Rd 776-5913
    River Ranch (Red River) 1501 West Main St 754-2293

    Enchanted Circle Day Drive: A ninety-mile trip that begins in Taos on Highway 64, winds through heavily forested Taos Canyon, climbs to 9,000 at Palo Flechado Pass (Pass of the Arrow) before reaching Angel Fire and the beautiful Moreno Valley. Continue east on 64 to the little village of Eagle Nest, then double back to Highway 38, the route to Red River. The road crests at Bobcat Pass, a nearly 10,000 elevation, before it drops into Red River. To return to Taos, follow the road out of Red River to Questa and #522 home. Approximately two hours actual driving time.

    Hiking:
    BLM Trails: Rio Grande Gorge
    General New Mexico Hikes page

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    Take a walk!

    by kymbanm Written Sep 11, 2006

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    Katmo, Beee n Misha-By AlbuqRay
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    This region is so spectacularly beautiful ... in a high desert/mountain sort-of-way. How can you NOT wander about??? Even simply walking along a dirt road is an adventure for your eyes! For the slightly more adventurous, there are loads of trails all around to wander further from others. There's a national forest (Carson), Brureau of Land Management areas, and others. I retrieved a little BLM brochure from the net and provided it to our visitors ... and of course they wandered off to see what they could see!

    The Chiflo trail was their choice one day .... marked as an easy trail, we decided it was more of a moderate trail ... with difficult parts. So enjoy these pics of their travels this particular day, and I hope it helps introduce you to the land of enchantment :)

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    Overview of Things to do :)

    by ArtistsOnVT Updated Sep 6, 2006

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    Taos Pueblo


    Taos Galleries
    Self-guided Taos Artwalk, map is here


    Taos Museums

    Horseback Riding:
    Taos Indian Horse Ranch (Taos) 505-758-3212 1-800-659-3210
    Bitter Creek Guest Ranch (Red River) Bitter Creek Rd 754-2587
    Cieneguilla Stables (Taos) 505-751-2815
    El Rito Horse Farm (El Rito) 505-581-464
    Red River Stables (Red River) 800 East Main St 505-754-1700
    Rio Grande Stables (Taos) 4 Juan-D Martinez Rd 776-5913
    River Ranch (Red River) 1501 West Main St 754-2293

    Enchanted Circle Day Drive: A ninety-mile trip that begins in Taos on Highway 64, winds through heavily forested Taos Canyon, climbs to 9,000 at Palo Flechado Pass (Pass of the Arrow) before reaching Angel Fire and the beautiful Moreno Valley. Continue east on 64 to the little village of Eagle Nest, then double back to Highway 38, the route to Red River. The road crests at Bobcat Pass, a nearly 10,000 elevation, before it drops into Red River. To return to Taos, follow the road out of Red River to Questa and #522 home. Approximately two hours actual driving time.

    Hiking:
    BLM Trails: Rio Grande Gorge
    General New Mexico Hikes page

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Questa Things to Do

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