Santa Fe Off The Beaten Path

  • Long house dwellings adjacent to each other
    Long house dwellings adjacent to each...
    by BruceDunning
  • Alcoe house-carved by hand
    Alcoe house-carved by hand
    by BruceDunning
  • Replicated kiva in Alcove house
    Replicated kiva in Alcove house
    by BruceDunning

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Santa Fe

  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    Take A Look At Camel Rock

    by VeronicaG Updated Jan 30, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As we traveled through Tesuque on US Hwy. 285 and Rt. 84 we were afforded a fantastic view of the mountains and a natural wonder called Camel Rock.

    Camel Rock is a sandstone formation that has been eroded into a camel-like shape. It sits off to one side of the highway, surrounded by a concrete wall which can be accessed by a walkway leading to the top of the hill. A small pull over allows a few vehicles to park, while taking a closer look at this natural formation.

    The wind howls through these hills, so its no wonder it has carved away at the rugged landscape.

    Camel Rock
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    • Singles
    • Family Travel

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  • queencreekfreak's Profile Photo

    The Mysterious Staircase of Loretto Chapel

    by queencreekfreak Updated Dec 17, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I have gone into the Loretto Chapel on numerous occasions bringing friends into Santa Fe for the first time. We usually park at the parking lot behind the Visitors Center so walking to the square this is on the way. This is a quaint little chapel with an interesting spiral staircase with a legend. The donation is $2.50 as of December 2006. You sit in the chapel and listen to a tape that discusses the legend of the Chapel. it is a very spiritual place. They also have a sweet little gift shop where you can purchase religous medals, post cards, rosaries etc. It also gives you some time to sit down, out of the sun and maybe do a little personal reflecting. I like this place.

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  • AlbuqRay's Profile Photo

    Santuario de Chimayo - Long a Holy Site

    by AlbuqRay Updated Oct 27, 2006

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    Chimayo is the first town on the "High Road" from Santa Fe to Taos over the Sangre de Christo Mountains. It is 8 miles east of Espanola on NM-76, then a short jog south or take the shortcut north from Nambe Pueblo (NM-503) from US-285 north of Santa Fe. It was founded in 1740 and is the "Lourdes of America." Even before the Spanish, the San Juan Pueblo Indians considered the mud from a hot spring in the area to have healing powers. Today visitors take "Holy Dirt" from a small hole in the floor in a side chapel (the dirt is replaced regularly).

    There are two signs when you arrive via NM-76. The larger sign says Santuario; skip that turn. It has shops and paid parking except for handicapped. Continue on to the Santuario Parking, which is free and is the back way into the chapel. Don't forget to notice all the homemade wooden crosses that pilgrims have attached to the fence. I recommend you read Kymbanm's truly wonderful tips on Chimayo.

    Chimayo Chapel Courtyard with Crosses Crosses by the Stream Crosses on the Fences Healing Earth
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    • Religious Travel

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  • Not just for birdwatchers

    by CCW Updated Jul 31, 2006

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    A much beloved location for locals, but not often visited by tourists, is the Randall Davey Audubon Center at the very top of Canyon Road. Randall Davey was an early artist in Santa Fe who left his property to the Audubon Society. The house usually isn't open to visitors (although tours can be arranged); but there's a small visitor center, and you can walk on some easy trails around the grounds and a slightly more ambitious one up Bear Canyon. Besides the excellent birdwatching at any season, it's a great place to view the local vegetation and just enjoy the fresh air. The trails are open sunrise to sunset every day. Their web site has a guide and a printable trail map. From about April through early September, the parking lot absolutely buzzes with hummingbirds!

    The Nature Conservancy purchased some adjoining property a few years ago, and new trails have been opened in that area -- I haven't checked them out, but they sound wonderful

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  • johnfrompalatineil's Profile Photo

    Worth finding-Rancho de Chimayo

    by johnfrompalatineil Written Jul 25, 2006

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    Take 285 to the Nambe turnoff, continue to the third cattle guard, turn right past the second arroyo and turn left by the double wide (Note: exaggeration, do not use these directions).
    Here are the real directions: http://www.ranchodechimayo.com/map/map.htm

    See where the real locals live on your way to Rancho De Chimayo restaurant. Food is excellent and place does great business in a semi-remote area. It is worth the drive!

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  • rexvaughan's Profile Photo

    Tesuque Glassworks

    by rexvaughan Updated Jun 3, 2006

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    About 6 miles north of Santa Fe is the little village of Tesuque which is home to the Tesuque Glassworks founded in 1975 by Charlie Miner. I found it a very pleasant surprise to see glass blowing in New Mexico but this small studio and gallery produces some very fine objects d’art plus it is an enjoyable experience to watch the process at close hand. You see the artists start with the molten fluid and turn it into various shapes of various colors.

    Because we did not know about them and therefore did not allow time, we were unable to see two other galleries next to the glassworks, Shidoni Bronze Foundry and Gallery and the Allan Houser Sculpture Garden. Just from passing by and reading about them, next time we will allow time for them as well. They appear to be well worth anyone’s time.

    Bishop's Lodge Road
    PO Box 146, Tesuque, NM 87574

    Artist at work The workroom Crystals in the garden outside the glassworks
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  • rexvaughan's Profile Photo

    Good cheap art on Canyon Road

    by rexvaughan Updated May 18, 2006

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    Most of the art works for sale on Canyon Road are quite expensive, but toward the north end of the road is an area below the level of the street where there are a couple of local artists who are a bit offbeat from the regulars on this strip. I encountered one of them, David Vigil. He is a very likeable character and has done some paintings in the style he calls contemporary exprssionism, one large and quite beautiful ond called 'Loretto Sunset' which he informed me sold for several thousands of dollars. However, to make ends meet he does small ones on pieces of wood and told me they were only $20. He then offered to make a box for one which had room above the painting so the paint could dry. When I touched one, it was still wet and I left a small smudge. I was embarassed but he said, "If you buy that one you can tell your friends you participated in the painting." Anyway, I did indeed buy one for $20 which I think is quite attractive. You can see it in the photo.

    Just next door to David Vigil's studio is the Ed Larson studio. His art is somewhat primitive but appealing and has a very definite political bent to it. He even writes poetry (doggerel?) and leaves copies for free pick up. I have one in a picture here and while you probably can't read it, it is entitled 'To All You Red State Republicans (I'm Worried About You).' It is a Bush basher - you can probably see the drawing at the top illustrating two lines in the poem: 'He ain't got no cattle, The man is all hat.' Politics aside, Mr. Larson is very entertaining.

    'Contemporary expressionist' landscape Me and David Vigil Vigil's 'Loretto Sunset' Ed Larson's studio entrance Ed Larson's poem
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  • queencreekfreak's Profile Photo

    Tesuque Pueblo Flea Market, Best Deals in Santa Fe

    by queencreekfreak Written Sep 11, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I love a bargain. After you have shopped all of the souvenir shops in Santa Fe be sure to save some money for some bargains. I recommend the Tesuque Pueblo Flea Market. It is located almost next to the Santa Fe Opera. It is about a 15 minute drive from downtown Santa Fe.
    You will find tons of artsy artisans, a great selection of jewelry, Native American pottery, Mexican pottery and an assortment of rusty western items. There are usually a few vendors also selling an assortment of flea market items. This is also a good place to buy southwestern spices such as dried green chili powder, curry and pinion nuts.
    There are some food and beverage vendors. Remember - drink lots of water. Dress in layers as it can get chilly and hot in the same day in Santa Fe. Also the Tesuque Pueblo Flea Market is a little higher than Santa Fe so the temperature may be a bit cooler too.
    I always recommend going to the flea market early in the day. It seems that vendors usually cut out around 1 pm.
    Name: Tesuque Pueblo Flea Market
    Address: P.O. Box 170
    Operates: Weekly - Friday, Saturday, & Sunday
    Hours open to the public: Last Weekend in March to November 8am - 5pm, February, March, & November - Saturday & Sunday - 8am to 4pm
    Dealers: Over 500 during peak season (April to August).
    Booths: Approx. 500 booths of which 250 are reserved vendors.
    Is there a parking fee? Presently, Yes.
    Directions:
    Take I-25 north to Santa Fe for approx. 65 miles to St. Francis Dr./Exit 282. Continue on St.Francis Dr. through Santa Fe, which will turn into Highway 84/285. Continue North for approx. 5.5 miles, the Flea Market is located on the left side next to the Santa Fe Opera.

    Mexian Pottery and Mask Tesuque Pueblo Flea Market Blankets and Rugs at the Flea Market Mexian Talavera Pottery Flea Market Vendor waiting for a sale
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    • Arts and Culture

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  • straehle's Profile Photo

    Time Warp Betwen Albuquerque and Santa Fe

    by straehle Written Aug 2, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I can recommend as others here have the Tourquoise Trail and the old mining towns of Madrid and Cerillos. Madrid is the larger of the two, even though the post office is in Cerillos. Madrid has attracted a large artsy group, I suppose fleeing the high prices and yuppyism of Santa Fe. Walk down the main street (New Mexico 14) and poke into the shops, the old time soda fountain, and the galleries.

    Soda Fountain in Madrid

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  • kymbanm's Profile Photo

    The Turquoise Trail Drive

    by kymbanm Written Jun 20, 2005

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    Though Albuquerque is only 60 miles a way, rather than taking the interstate, why don't you take my favorite route? Take Hwy 14 south through the mountains and the artist community of Madrid instead! This little diversion will allow you to really feel the life of locals and provide you with even more gallery browsing ;)

    After Madrid, continue wandering your way down Hwy 14 and through Cedar Crest - then follow the signs into Albuquerque :)

    Life in Madrid
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  • karenincalifornia's Profile Photo

    Bandelier National Monument

    by karenincalifornia Updated Jun 1, 2005

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    Bandelier National Monument is the location of the old cliff dwellings of Ancestral Pueblo people. The Ancestral Pueblo people occupied Bandelier for more than 400 years, from 1150 A.D until the 16th century. When the Spanish occupied and colonized New Mexico, the Pueblo people were scattered, and Bandelier was essentially abandoned. Today, you can easily walk over to the cliff dwellings and climb into a few of them by ladder.

    Bandelier National Monument is located 40 minutes to the northwest of Santa Fe.

    Bandelier National Monument, New Mexico
    Related to:
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    • Archeology

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  • karenincalifornia's Profile Photo

    Hiking

    by karenincalifornia Updated Jun 1, 2005

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    The Santa Fe area is a hiking mecca. There are hundreds of hikes near Santa Fe in the high dessert and in the nearby Sangre de Cristo mountains. In Bandelier National Monument alone, there 70 miles of trails. This picture was taken on a trail in the Bandelier National Monument.

    Hiking in Bandelier National Monument
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    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • karenincalifornia's Profile Photo

    Bandelier National Monument

    by karenincalifornia Updated Jun 1, 2005

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    Along with the cave dwellings in Bandelier are interesting rock formations. You'll note some old ruins in the background of this photo. That is what remains from the ancestral village of Tyuonyi. The village was built in a circle and had more than 40 tiny rooms. This village was abandoned by the mid-1500s. No one is certain where these people went.

    You will not be permitted to climb on the walls. In addition, you can climb into designated dwellings only.

    Bandelier National Monument, New Mexico
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    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Archeology

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  • lareina's Profile Photo

    Enjoy the Beauty Around Santa Fe

    by lareina Written Jan 20, 2005

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    There are many areas near Santa Fe that are excellent for lovers of the outdoors. In this tip, I'll mention a few, but most locations have their own tip pages as well. Also, you can check out my Santa Fe Travelogue for detailed info.

    The Aspen Vista is a beautiful place to visit and hike at in the autumn. The leaves of the aspens turn bright yellow and glow in the evening light. Take Hyde Park Road from SF, takes about 20 minutes driving.

    Bandelier National Monument is an excellent place to hike and also learn about Native American culture. There are cliff dwellings in the canyon which you can visit via wooden ladders. Take 84 North from Santa Fe and then NM502 towards Los Alamos, about a 45min drive.

    Tent Rocks is a unique area south of Santa Fe. Take I-25 south from SF and head west on the Cochiti Lake exit, takes about 40min. There are two hikes, a lower and an upper. The upper is a moderate hike and takes you past the strange tent-topped rock formations.

    The aspens in autumn...
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Archeology
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • CliffClaven's Profile Photo

    Bandelier National Monument

    by CliffClaven Written Sep 8, 2004

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    An easy hour’s drive from Santa Fe will take you to the Bandelier National Monument. The site is named after Adolph Bandelier, the 19th-century Swiss-American who devoted his life to studying the Pueblo Indians of the southwest. The site, deep in the Frijoles Canyon, is full of natural caves and cavities which were used by the Anasazi Indians when they lived here between 700 and 450 years ago. There is an interesting visitor centre and souvenir shop.

    Related to:
    • Archeology

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