Santa Fe Shopping

  • Folk art funeral, Jackalope, Santa Fe
    Folk art funeral, Jackalope, Santa Fe
    by goodfish
  • Chile ristras
    Chile ristras
    by goodfish
  • Jackalope, Santa Fe
    Jackalope, Santa Fe
    by goodfish

Most Recent Shopping in Santa Fe

  • SFHulaGIrl's Profile Photo

    Heavenly Boutique: Girly (& Cool) Things Everywhere

    by SFHulaGIrl Written Aug 20, 2013

    Although this little boutique focuses mainly on women's clothes, you can find jewelry (faux jewelry, as well as authentic Native American Indian) and some lingerie-type items to boot. What makes it special is the personalized attention that you'll receive from the friendly owner, Kim Roman, as well as her adorable dogs, Romeo & Bella. The latter two will also be happy cover you with kisses as you shop!

    What to buy: A great selection of high end jeans (think Rock Revival), high end flip flops (Gypsy Soule) and other casual, as well as dressy (blouses, dresses, etc.). Her sale prices are great!

    What to pay: $30-$200, depending on what you buy.

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  • Roadquill's Profile Photo

    Licensed Indian Vendors: Authentic Indian Jewelry

    by Roadquill Written Sep 11, 2012

    Lining the Governors Building facing the Santa Fe Plaza are licensed, local Indian jewelry vendors. Many of the vendors are also the artists that make the jewelry. Many of the artists take great pride in the turquoise they use and the other materials they use. The vendors must be licensed and the inspectors make sure that the products or authentic.

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  • Gillybob's Profile Photo

    The Original Trading Post: Every souvenir you can think of!!

    by Gillybob Written Feb 26, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Original Trading Post
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    With not an inch of unused space in this shop, The Original Trading Post accommodates a variety of souvenirs including T-shirts, key rings, shot glasses, Native American basketware and pottery, postcards, etc.

    One section of the shop holds a selection of Western-style suede and leather jackets, long skirts and belts.

    One side of the shop is devoted entirely to selling jewellery, including many pieces of Native American design including turquoise, rose stone and other traditional materials.

    I was drawn into the shop by it's selection of postcards, which are very reasonably priced; I ended up leaving the shop with some postcards and a couple of pieces of jewellery - equally reasonably priced.

    What to buy: The selection of Native American jewellery is impressive and is sure to include a piece to meet everyone's desires.

    What to pay: Santa Fe is notorious for pricing it's wares for the tourist, yet I found The Original Trading Post's prices extremely competitive - almost comparing with those in Albuquerque.

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Palace of the Governors: Native American Artisans Program

    by toonsarah Updated Dec 1, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Native jewellery seller in the Plaza
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    Along the portico of the Palace of the Governors, and on the north side of the Plaza opposite, Native Americans take up their places each day to sell jewellery and other traditional crafts. This is an eighty year old tradition, nowadays operated through the “Native American Artisans Program of the Palace of the Governors”. There are around 1,000 vendors who are licensed to sell here after going through a strict application process to assess the quality of their work. The goods displayed and sold by participants in the scheme must be made by the seller or by their household members. Every morning the 63 spots available, each 12 bricks wide, are allocated by lottery, so you can never be sure who you will find here or what they will be selling. But it’s a great opportunity to buy directly from the creator and as they all seem happy to talk about their work you will also find out a bit about the piece you are buying.

    What to buy: I looked at a number of items. One man was selling silver necklaces with representations of the different sacred animals, such as Bear and Wolf, and explained the meaning of each to me. But in the end I opted for turquoise, choosing a pretty silver necklace threaded with small stones which the seller told me came from Arizona.

    What to pay: Prices seemed reasonable to me for the quality of the work – you are of course cutting out the middleman by purchasing here rather than in a shop. My necklace was $40 – I didn’t try haggling as no one else appeared to be doing so, and I felt the price was fair.

    This is my last tip; return to the Intro page

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  • Bunsch's Profile Photo

    Keshi: The Zuni connection

    by Bunsch Written Jun 11, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A fetish necklace (website photo)
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    If you're on the lookout for festishes, you can hardly do better than Keshi, a coop which has been marketing Zuni arts and crafts for the past thirty years. Case after case of beautifully carved mountain lions, bison, snakes, eagles, wolves, frogs, rabbits, turtles, moles, badgers, and bears will enchant you. These fetishes have been used by the Zuni for a millennium. Each has its own natural traits, and so carrying one or keeping it handy to look at may be a way of summoning our own strengths. (In fact, Keshi provides you with a small bag of blue corn with which to "feed" your festish and enhance its special traits.)

    There are, of course, many necklaces of fetishes. Authentic Zuni fetish necklaces feature finely made shell (or jet, turquoise, or coral) beads from Santo Domingo Pueblo between each fetish. You can expect to pay at least $200.00 per strand for such necklaces.

    Other jewelry, belt buckles, and traditional items are also available.

    What to buy: I found a perfectly carved crow with the turquoise eye which I plan to give my son upon his return from Tokyo, where crows are a major hazard of daily life. It is nice to know his provenance -- the shop gives you a receipt with the name of the carver and the pueblo, which is a great idea.

    What to pay: My crow, which is about an inch high, was $40.00.

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    • Women's Travel
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  • Bunsch's Profile Photo

    The Chile Shop: Hot, hot, hot

    by Bunsch Written Jun 10, 2011

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The proprietor in front of his ristras

    As you might expect from the name, The Chile Shop does sell hot sauces, salsas, seasonings and soup mixes, and a lot of things which have chiles on them (ornaments, holiday cards, mugs, calendars, tiles, windsocks, strings of lights, tote bags, etc.). But if you expected that would be it, you'd be missing the chance to see some marvelous local pottery, southwestern crystal, and unique gift items.

    What to buy: I was particularly taken by the Petroglyph Pottery, which is hand-thrown and glazed in terra cotta and flat black and then carved with classic petrogylphs. Sounds expensive, yes? It is, but it is also oven and dishwasher safe. And you could buy just a single exemplar -- say a 5" bread plate for $70 in lieu of the 20" round platter for $625 -- to look at in admiration.

    Related to:
    • Festivals
    • Women's Travel
    • Road Trip

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  • Bunsch's Profile Photo

    Walk in Beauty/The Navajo Way: Immense skill and exquisite results

    by Bunsch Written Jun 9, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bobby in his shop

    Bobby Nofchissey bills himself as "Fine Native American Jewelry Sales & Services" and truer words were seldom spoken. I doubt we'd have found his space in the Santa Fe Arcade if it had not been for the glowing recommendation at Keshi, where my friend had purchased a replacement Zuni bracelet for one stolen in an Albuquerque house-break. The new bracelet wasn't quite large enough to be comfortable, so she bought the matching earrings, also a lovely inlay, and at the store's urging, took both items to Bobby. Less than an hour later, he'd fabricated new connections, installed a new clasp, and handed my friend a bracelet that she'll happily wear for years. He was not inexpensive, but the craftsmanship was impeccable. If I were in the market for some high-end pieces (especially in gold), Bobby would be my choice.

    Related to:
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    • Archeology
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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  • goodfish's Profile Photo

    Native American Vendors Program: Pride of the Portal

    by goodfish Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is the best place to find that treasure to take home! The long, covered porch (portal) of the historic Palace of the Governors is reserved exclusively for skilled members of the Native American Vendor's Program to market their wonderful crafts. To be accepted in the program, a vendor's works have to be handmade, traditional to the culture, demonstrate a high level of quality and carry a maker's mark that guarantees that it's the real deal. Jewelry, beadwork, leather goods, weavings, pottery, and other offerings are inspected daily by an appointed committee, and the Museum of New Mexico's Board of Regents oversees the integrity and strict regulation of the program's rules and regulations.

    It's great because everybody wins: Native Americans have a dignified, high-traffic, rent-free outlet for their works, traditional craftsmanship thrives and visitors are assured that the items they purchase are genuine and not cheap knockoffs from heaven-knows-where. Prices range depending on the amount of precious metals or other costly materials an item contains and/or the amount of hours involved to create the piece but there's something in everyone's price range and browsing is half the fun!

    360 days a year, roughly mid-mornings through early evenings.

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  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    Ortega's Weaving Shop: Weaving of all Types

    by VeronicaG Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Wonderful Weavings!!
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    We arrived early one morning at the Sanctuario de Chimayo, but found congregants praying in the chapel. Rather than disturb them, we all agreed to backtrack to Ortega's Weaving Shop and return a short while later to see the little chapel.

    It was a very good decision! The Ortega family has been offering beautifully woven creations since the 1700's, so their products stand out from the crowd!

    Inside the shop, we discovered brightly colored weavings of blankets, placemats, coasters, pillows, men's and women's vests, jackets and coats, bookmarks, purses...so many things expertly done in gorgeous combinations of hues and designs.

    The store also had a glass case full of silver and torquoise jewelry, from which I selected a nicely designed bracelet (see picture#3). The pieces were discounted 25%! Somehow, a reflection of gold and red are shown in the picture, which is not on the actual torquoise.

    To one side of the shop is a small room containing looms (picture #2), the type on which these lovely items are created.

    Note: This shop was priced better than the shop by the same name located off the Santa Fe town plaza.

    What to buy: Any woven item--beautifully executed in lovely colors

    What to pay: Reasonable

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    • Women's Travel
    • Family Travel

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  • Papergami: Paper, paper, everywhere.

    by RblWthACoz Updated Apr 4, 2011

    This is an interesting store with a huge amount of large specialty papers you could use to wrap gifts or use for art projects. Of course a lot of it has that Asian feel to it, but there are also greeting cards to buy and things like that.

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  • SFHulaGIrl's Profile Photo

    Sun Country Traders: Sun Country Traders

    by SFHulaGIrl Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Native American jewelry is what first lured me in, though it's the belt buckles & tips that actually hooked me! Their selection (of both jewelry & buckles) is good, as are prices. Most everything seemed to be signed/initialed on the back so you KNOW that it's authentic. The staff was friendly and helpful in every way!

    What to buy: I bought my belt at Tom Taylor in the La Fonda Hotel (at the suggestion of one of the salespeople here), but bought my much more affordable Native American buckle & tip at Sun Country Traders. They gladly attached the buckle & tip to the belt while I waited.

    What to pay: Jewelry prices range, as can be expected. Silver buckles & tips were approximately $80 to $300, depending on intricacy of design.

    Related to:
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    • Women's Travel

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  • goodfish's Profile Photo

    Jackalope: "A World of Curiosities"

    by goodfish Updated Nov 27, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Jackalope, Santa Fe
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    I love this place. Since 1976, Jackalope has been delighting visitors, young and old, with its riotous array of wonderful, colorful, eclectic stuff from all over the globe. It's what eccentric owner, Darby McQuade, calls "Pier 1 on steroids." That's an understatement - and also why it's such a hoot. Rugs, furniture, folk art, pottery, hats, personal accessories, dinnerware, Christmas ornaments, specialty food items and anything else you can think of are crammed into multiple buildings and sheds that ramble over several acres. Yes, acres. Gravel paths in between display pots, planters, and hanging decorations for the garden, and there's even an animal barn and prairie dog village that'll tickle the young folk. Heck, there's even a cafe! It's a whacky, funky little village guaranteed to make you smile and keep you occupied for hours.

    DO bring the kids - they'll love it and it's THE place to let them pick out a treasure to take home 'cause it's not just fun, it's bargain-shopper's heaven!
    Extra tip: They sometimes have artisans demonstrating their special crafts on site.

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  • Toughluck's Profile Photo

    The Santa Fe Plaza: Galaries

    by Toughluck Written Nov 19, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Governors Palace
    1 more image

    This is the traditional place for vistiors to shop. Galeries line the plaza along with restaurants. The restaurants vary in price and setting, the galeries tend to all be the higher end. They cater to individuals looking for specific artists or styles. Then there's the Governors Palace. Native arts and crafts at reasonable prices. At the Palace, you'll have a chance to meet many of the craftspersons themselves.

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    • Arts and Culture

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  • Toughluck's Profile Photo

    New galaries and shops: The Depot

    by Toughluck Written Nov 19, 2009

    The Depot area of Santa Fe had been neglected since the railroad link disappeared in the 1960's or 70's. But with the arrival of the Railrunner (2006), this area has developed into restaurants and shops. It's a modern southwestern style contrast to the Plaza area. Similar shops, but lower priced and oriented to the less affluent traveler.

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  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    Tesuque Glass: Collecting Art Glass?

    by VeronicaG Updated Oct 22, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tesuque Glass
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    Tesuque Glass had a nice selection of unique and contemporary glassware.

    As I surveyed the store, I noticed plates with lovely swirled patterns, vases crowned with a flourish of ruffles, colorful bowls and glass baubles in assorted hues for the garden, bracelets, earrings, wine and beverage glasses, stylized floral votives and whimsical red glass chili peppers.

    Each piece of art glass was arranged to its best advantage on shelves or hanging just so to catch the light from the windows, reflecting it beautifully throughout the shop. (picture#2).

    The glass studio was located near Shidoni Foundry--also in the shopping tips.

    What to buy: Unique art glass creations

    What to pay: Art prices

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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Santa Fe Shopping

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