Santa Fe Transportation

  • Watch your station time & don't miss the train
    Watch your station time & don't miss the...
    by keida84
  • Lonely Train Tracks in Lamy, New Mexico
    Lonely Train Tracks in Lamy, New Mexico
    by keida84
  • SInk in the bedroom on the Viewliner
    SInk in the bedroom on the Viewliner
    by keida84

Most Recent Transportation in Santa Fe

  • keida84's Profile Photo

    Getting there is half the fun! Who knew?

    by keida84 Updated Jan 20, 2014

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    Lonely Train Tracks in Lamy, New Mexico
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    We took a winter trip to Santa Fe, New Mexico by Amtrak train to re-state our wedding vows We have been married 20 years) and take a small vacation. I admit I was a tad nervous but I made accommodations in the sleeper car for a private room outbound and inbound. They promised to bring our meals to or room so I wouldn't have to try and balance myself and my fork and my dignity at the same time. True to their word our meals were brought to our room in a beautiful white bag and each meal was delicious and included in the price of our ticket.

    We boarded the train in our hometown and took it down to Los Angeles Union Station, we were whisked off the platform by a very nice lady and taken to the new 1st class lounge Amtrak has constructed, there we could freshen up and have a nice complimentary snack before the cart came to help us board our train, The Southwest Chief. Excellent service, we did not know we qualified for first class but if you hold a sleeper car reservation it is considered first class. Who knew?

    Outbound we had a roomette, that is the smallest space you will ever fold your body in comfortably. Don't take much luggage if you are reserving a Viewliner roomette, (the Superliner roomette has more overhead storage) The roomette is almost the size of 3 telephone booths (If you remember what those were like.) Efficient and easily survivable.

    On our return we booked a bedroom whichis much larger as it had its own toilet and shower (the latter which my husband LOVED...me thinks it was more the novelty of it). Excellent cabin service by Rene our attendant. He took care of us and here in the states it is customary to tip him when you leave but you should do whatever is best for you.

    In one station stop they came out to clean all the windows for picture takers like me. Who knew?

    We arrived in Lamy, New Mexico and took the shuttle van right to our hotel and they picked us up on the return. This too was included in the price of our ticket.

    I am heading to Sedona this summer and be assured Amtrak is a part of those plans

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    Tourist Bus

    by Roadquill Updated Sep 19, 2012

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    There is a small, open air tourist bus called the Loretto Line that you can pick up by the old town central Plaza, takes you up Canyon past the art galleries, then up past the celebrity homes, up to the Museum Hill, then back around old town. Takes about 1 hour and 15 minutes and gives you a good overall look at what is available in Santa Fe, plus some history. Our guide was a local born.

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    New Mexico Rail Runner

    by Gillybob Updated Feb 26, 2012

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    Rail Runner train
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    The New Mexico Rail Runner is a train service which runs from Belen in the south, through Albuquerque, to Santa Fe as it's terminus in the north.

    The Rail Runner offers a great opportunity to non-drivers who are staying in the area to access Santa Fe at low cost. The service is not frequent, providing mainly for commuters, however, there are a number of services which run part routes and a select few which run the full route from Belen to Santa Fe or reverse.

    Tickets are very reasonably priced, especially if you take a day pass option; Albuquerque to Santa is US$7 whilst the day pass costs only an additional US$1 at US$8.

    The trains run along Amtrak rails and are comfortable and spacious.

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Explore on foot

    by toonsarah Updated Dec 1, 2011

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    Sign on W San Francisco St

    Santa Fe is a very walkable city, for the most part. Nearly all of the main sights are in the downtown district or only a few blocks beyond it. The only time we used the car, apart from a day trip out of the city, was when we went to the Railyard and from there on to Canyon Road as we thought we might want to explore much of the latter’s length (in practice though we found more than enough to interest us in just the first few galleries that we investigated). Apart from that we spent most of our time walking the streets around the Plaza or venturing just a little south to the Santurio de Guadalupe and to the San Miguel Mission, both just a few blocks beyond the confines of downtown.

    It’s hard to get lost here. The streets in the centre follow the familiar US grid pattern, though here they all have names not numbers. And there are signposts on every corner in downtown, pointing you towards all the main sights. If you need one you can pick up a good free map – we were given ours when we checked in to the Chapelle Street Casitas, and I noticed them too in the lobby of La Fonda Hotel.

    +++Next tip!+++

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  • iam1wthee's Profile Photo

    getting around town

    by iam1wthee Written Nov 20, 2011

    Santa Fe is walkable.

    The local buses are $1. http://www.santafenm.gov/DocumentView.aspx?DID=9229

    The train charges by distance http://nmrailrunner.com/route_map.asp

    Car is needed to go places like the springs, parks, cave dwellings,
    You can choose to do a tour but it may be more expensive and most tours do not go to the springs

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    airport transportation

    by iam1wthee Written Nov 20, 2011

    If you do not take American Eagle airline then you will be dropped off in Alburquerque. There is a local bus #22 that runs Mon-Fri that takes you to the railrunner train. Most hotels will be near the last stop santa fe depot. It will costs $7. If you arrive on the weekend then take either the Alburquerque shuttle or taxi to the railrunner train. There are two shuttles that go to alburquerque but one is $27 and the other is $25 dollars.

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    The Santa Fe Pick-up

    by Toughluck Updated Nov 20, 2009

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    Hourly: Free:

    While downtown Santa Fe is compact, there's more to see in a day than you'd like to walk to. So, they've added a free shuttle service to the core of the city. In the off-season, it's a direct run between the Santa Fe Depot and the Plaza. In the summer, it does a loop around town, covering the main attractions.

    The route is a one-way circle, so you can get on and off as much as you want and still see the highlights of town. The routes start at the Santa Fe Depot (A), in front of the New Mexico Film Museum (the former Jean Cocteau Cinema) on Montezuma Avenue.

    (B) The Capitol/PERA building
    (C) Two stops on Canyon Road
    (D) One stop at Alameda and Paseo de Peralta
    (E) The Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi
    (F) The Main Library
    (G) City Hall
    (H) The Santa Fe Community Convention Center / Santa Fe Plaza
    (I) Eldorado / Hilton hotels

    The Service is run by the Parking Division.

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    Santa Fe Southern Railway (SFSR)

    by Toughluck Written Nov 19, 2009

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    In spite of the stories and the name of the historic Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway, the railroad, never actually went "through" Santa Fe. The Santa Fe stop was Lamy, about an hour south of town. From there a linking railroad was added to bring travelors into town. These smaller passenger lines became defunct years ago. We'll you can once again ride that historic link on the preservation railroad, called the Santa fe Southern Railway (SFSR). They run excursion trains to and from the Santa Fe Depot to Lamy, stop for a meal and then return. In winter, they're on a short schedule, but they do operate during the holidays.

    In the summer, there is a regular schedule and the opportunity to make the 'golden triangle'. From either Santa Fe or Albuquerque, you can:

    from Santa Fe
    - Get the SFSR to Lamy
    - Connect with the west bound Southwestern Chief (Amtrak) to Albuquerque
    - link up with the Railrunner and return to Santa Fe.

    from Albuquerque
    - Take the Railrunner and to Santa Fe.
    - Get the SFSR to Lamy
    - Connect with the west bound Southwestern Chief (Amtrak) back to Albuquerque.

    If you like train travel, you'll have a day of it.

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  • Airports

    by CCW Updated Jan 9, 2007

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    Fly to Albuquerque -- Santa Fe Airport is very small and has few commercial flights; also, it's out on the edge of town, and, unless your hotel provides transportation, getting downtown can be expensive.

    There are a couple of shuttle bus services that run from the Albuquerque airport to Santa Fe. It's a REALLY good idea to reserve your seat in advance: the buses can fill up rapidly at popular travel times. Also, if you're not staying near a regular shuttle stop, you need to arrange in advance for the bus to drop you off or pick you up at your motel.

    If you intend to rent a car, it's almost always cheaper to get it at the Albuquerque airport and drive up than to take the shuttle and rent a car in Santa Fe. (But if you just want a car for a day or two during a longer trip, Santa Fe's prices are comparable to most other cities': I recommend Enterprise.) It pays to shop around before you arrive.

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  • Gas prices in Santa Fe

    by CCW Updated Oct 11, 2006

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    Gas prices in Santa Fe were, for many years, notoriously high. With the advent of a discount gas station at Sam's Club on Rodeo Road (members only), this has changed: prices are still high in some areas (e.g., the "motel row" on Cerrillos Road), but other stations that cater to locals have lowered their prices in an effort to compete. Usually Fina stations are a few cents cheaper than the rest, but I've also had good luck at Conoco/Phillips 66 (check the station on the east side of Cerrillos Road between Cordova Road and St. Francis, and the two on Airport Road) and some Shell stations (e.g., the one at Guadalupe and Cerrillos).

    N.B., if your car is equipped for biodiesel, the Conoco station at Cerrillos and Baca St. carries it at about the same price as regular unleaded.

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  • Bus service

    by CCW Updated Jul 31, 2006

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    There's a bus system that covers many popular tourist areas, so I advise using this if you don't want to fool with parking (which is frustrating at best). However, the buses tend to be few and far between on Sundays.

    Bus schedules are posted at the main terminal area on Sheridan Street, which runs just west of the Fine Arts Museum off the Plaza; you can also pick up printed schedules at the main library, or (during the summer) at the tourist information window next to the bank on the west side of the Plaza, and some hotels and motels have them too.

    Recently (mostly because of construction) the city has begun offering free or inexpensive shuttle buses during major events where downtown parking is an issue -- e.g., Spanish Market. Schedules and pickup points are announced in the papers just before and during the event.

    If you arrive in town by bus, there's a small Greyhound station, but it's open only at irregular hours (i.e., whenever a bus is due to arrive or depart). If you get there two hours early, you may have to wait outside. In inclement weather, it's a good idea to walk a couple of blocks east to the Smith's shopping center, where there are several restaurants.

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    Motorcycle Convention

    by AlbuqRay Updated Dec 4, 2005

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    Looking East on Palace Avenue
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    I happened to be on the Plaza one time when a motorcycle convention roared (literally) into town. The Plaza went from zero motorcycles to hundred's in just a few minutes. After a couple of speeches, they headed for the restaurants.

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    Parking in Santa Fe

    by queencreekfreak Updated Sep 4, 2005

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    Oldest Church in Santa Fe, near visitors center

    If you are not staying in Santa Fe but are there for the day, parking can be a hassle. I like to park at the visitors center and walk north towards the square. The Santa Fe Visitors Center located in the Lamy Building at the corner of Paseo de Peralta and Old Santa Fe Trail across the street from the state capitol. If you have just had a long drive from another city they have clean bathrooms here and helpful brochures. On the way, stop by the Oldest Church in Santa Fe and the Loretto Chapel. The chapel is only a buck or two and worth the time listening to the tourist tape.http://www.theoutlaws.com/unexplained4.htm

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    Leaving on a jet plane

    by karenincalifornia Updated Jun 6, 2005

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    Travelers in Albuquerque waiting for their flight

    The best way to get to Santa Fe is to fly into the Albuquerque airport, rent a car and drive one hour north to Santa Fe. Car rentals are inexpensive - we got a full size car for about $20/day.

    Our flight from San Francisco to Albuquerque was on a tiny Canadair jet. You hit any amount of turbulence and you get thrown around like bagful of pinons. I've flown on the same kind of jet when I've gone to tiny towns with tiny airports in the South, except there I feel like a bag of black-eyed peas.

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  • bhemak's Profile Photo

    Walk

    by bhemak Written Feb 10, 2005

    You can rent a car while in town, but I see very little reason. The vast majority of interesting things are less than a mile apart and parking is not very easy. Cabs do exist, should you get real tired.

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