Taos Pueblo, Taos

12 Reviews

120 Veterans Hwy Taos, NM 87571 575-758-1028

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  • View of pueblo in backdrop
    View of pueblo in backdrop
    by BruceDunning
  • Picture of the pueblo area
    Picture of the pueblo area
    by BruceDunning
  • Old San Geronimo
    Old San Geronimo
    by toonsarah
  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Taos Pueblo

    by BruceDunning Written May 27, 2013

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    View of pueblo in backdrop
    1 more image

    It is on Navajo reservation. So they charge what will prevail; that being $10. This is for a guide tour and the tour takes about 20 minutes tops. You only see a couple of rooms/apartment portions. The whole visit is not worth the effort. Photos not allowed

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Taos Pueblo

    by toonsarah Written Dec 27, 2011

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    North House
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    Perhaps the most important sight to see is not in Taos itself but a few miles to the north. Taos Pueblo is amazing! It’s the only living Native American community to have been designated both a World Heritage Site by UNESCO and a National Historic Landmark. These multi-storied adobe buildings have been continuously inhabited for over 1000 years and are considered to be the oldest continuously inhabited communities in the USA.

    As well as the much-photographed adobe houses there are two very photogenic churches – the now-ruined original San Geronimo and its mid nineteenth century replacement of the same name. Unlike at Acoma, you are free to wander around on your own, although some areas are off-limits to tourists. However, based on our experience I would strongly recommend taking one of the guided tours as an introduction to the pueblo, before going off to explore some more. Approximately 150 people live here in the Pueblo itself, but as at Acoma, all the buildings are owned by Taos families who may live in more modern homes elsewhere on Pueblo land and return here for festivals and special occasions. Our young guide spoke about the powerful draw that the Pueblo has over its people, and described the sense of almost obligation she feels to spend time here and contribute to the community.

    As always when visiting a pueblo, there are etiquette rules to be followed:
    1. Please report, and pay the appropriate fee for, each camera you carry into the Pueblo area.
    2. Please respect the "restricted area" signs as they protect the privacy of our residents and the sites of our native religious practices.
    3. Do not enter doors that are not clearly marked as curio shops. Each home is privately owned and occupied by a family and is not a museum display to be inspected with curiosity.
    4. Please do not photograph members of our tribe without first asking permission.
    5. Absolutely no photography in San Geronimo Chapel.
    6. Do not enter the walls surrounding the ruins of the old church and our cemetery.
    7. Do not wade in our river -- our sole source of drinking water.

    The Pueblo is open Monday - Saturday 8.00am-4.00pm and Sunday 8.30am-4.00pm. The guided tours start from 9.00 am. I recommend coming early when the light is better for photos and there are fewer people around. In October 2011 we paid $10 for an adult, plus $6 fee for photography (charge made per camera, video and mobile phones included).

    Please see my separate Taos Pueblo page for more detailed information about the morning we spent here.

    +++Next tip!+++

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  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    Taos Pueblo Sights

    by richiecdisc Written May 12, 2009

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    the amazing tiered adobe dwellings
    2 more images

    It is a beautiful development and if you go early, offers great photographic opportunities. There is no graffiti and it is a very clean and well kept town. The local people go about their lives with minimal concessions to modernity. No electricity or running water is allowed. Yet, they not play up to the tourist dollar by dressing in traditional garb either. The San Geronimo Chapel and cemetery, in particular, are quite stunning. The tiered adobe dwellings are as impressive as anything in the more famous Native parks like Canyon de Chelly or Mesa Verde. One of the most interesting things is that there were no doorways as they entered the living spaces from above so used ladders to gain access. Clay ovens called hornos are scattered about and is where they still bake their bread. It is both a UNESCO World Heritage Site as well as a National Historic Landmark.

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  • painterdave's Profile Photo

    Taos Pueblo/Historical Town

    by painterdave Updated Dec 27, 2007

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    Much like it used to be hundreds of years ago
    1 more image

    Here are some more photos of the Taos Indian Pueblo which lies just north and a bit east of the town of Taos . These native americans are especially famous because their pueblo is multi storied.
    If you arrive there during the middle of the day, you can find craft items and food, a museum and sometimes activities.
    There is an entrance fee.

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  • painterdave's Profile Photo

    Visit the Taos Indian Pueblo

    by painterdave Written Mar 21, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    part of the pueblo

    The Taos Indian Pueblo is one of New Mexico's best photo opportunities. This multi-level pueblo is the home for the Taos community. Visitors during the day can try fried break prepared by the Indian women and there will be crafts on sale, too. If you go early in the day you will have a chance for photos without tourists in them.
    Check the local tourist office for chances on attending festivals and dances by the Taos tribe.
    Expect to pay less for souvenirs made by the tribe, than you would in a shop in the town of Taos.

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  • leafmcgowan's Profile Photo

    Taos Pueblo Cemetery

    by leafmcgowan Written Dec 26, 2005

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    Taos Pueblo Cemetery

    The first location for the original San Geronimo Church that was built in 1619 by Spanish priests with Indian labor, where they forced the people of the Taos Pueblo into Catholicism and slavery in order to become "civilized". This is what led into what is called the "Pueblo revolt of 1680". The Taos Pueblo was the prominent headquarters for the revolt which was led by Pope. After the revolt, the Pueblo people of New Mexico lived freely until the re-conquest by the Spanish in the 1700s. By 1706 the church was reconstructed.

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  • leafmcgowan's Profile Photo

    Taos Pueblo

    by leafmcgowan Written Dec 26, 2005
    Taos Pueblo

    "The First Living World Heritage". The original Taos Pueblo home and village. Many consider this Pueblo to be the oldest continuously inhabited community in the U.S. Seasonally there are events, ceremonies, and dances showing our history still active today. Many different arts and craft businesses out of each of the Pueblo homes. They still speak their native language of Tiwa which they claim will remain unwritten and unrecorded. The details of their traditional values they guard and will not divulge. They welcome visitors so a taste of their life can be seen by the visitors. The courtyard holds a small Adobe Catholic church. Each house have clay pit ovens. An intriguing cemetery off to the side around a desolate ruin surrounded by wooden crosses. A river running through the center of the plaza. Its worth a visit and to see, however, its a bit pricey, $10 entrance and $5 camera fee.

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  • Easty's Profile Photo

    Taos Pueblo

    by Easty Updated Jun 22, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Taos Pueblo

    Taos Pueblo is one of the oldest Native American communities in New Mexico. Walking through this was like going back in time to the 18th Century. The complex has many fascinating structures, including a nice size Catholic Church and interesting graveyard. It is definitely an educational experience. Please note that admission is $10 per adult plus a $5 camera fee. For more pictures and information, please see my Taos Pueblo Travelogue

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  • kala6487's Profile Photo

    Taos Pueblo

    by kala6487 Written May 26, 2004

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    One of the 'locals' at the pueblo

    This pueblo has been occupied for over a thousand years. It is open to the public and you can meander through it at your own pace if you like. Most the rooms that are open house native art work. I found that people that live there pretty friendly and willing to talk about their life and their past. We bought some homemade bread and cookies that were delicious.

    I do think the admission is a little steep - $10 per person and $5 per camera.

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  • pipsqueak's Profile Photo

    Taos Pueblo

    by pipsqueak Written Sep 30, 2003
    Taos Pueblo dwelling

    Taos Pueblo is the oldest continuously inhabited community in the United States. Anywhere from 50-100 people live in the pueblo without of the modern conveniences of running water or electricity. The structures are made of traditional adobe bricks covered with a thin protective coat of more adobe.
    There is a guided tour of the pueblo, which is very interesting and takes about 20 minutes.
    There is a fee to enter the pueblo and a per camera fee also if you wish to take photos.
    This is a photo of the first "condo", a multi-story adobe complex. Note the ladders that allow the upper story residents to enter through the top of their dwellings.

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  • phil_uk_net's Profile Photo

    Taos Pueblo

    by phil_uk_net Written Nov 11, 2002

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    Taos Pueblo

    Taos Pueblo is the forerunner of the modern apartment building. Multi-storey accommodation made from adobe inhabited by Taos Indians.
    There is a church and graveyard and several craft shops selling items made by the local people.
    There is an entry charge and an additional charge for camera equipment.
    It is quite a magical place.

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    basstbn's Things to Do Tip

    by basstbn Written Aug 24, 2002

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    The Pueblo de Taos is believed to have existed by the year 1400 and is one of the best preserved examples of a pueblo in the southwestern US.

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