Taos Pueblo Warnings and Dangers

  • Craft shop, Taos Pueblo
    Craft shop, Taos Pueblo
    by goodfish
  • Shot this way to hide vendors, coolers, signs...
    Shot this way to hide vendors, coolers,...
    by goodfish
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by toonsarah

Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Taos Pueblo

  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Pueblo etiquette

    by toonsarah Written Dec 18, 2011

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    Taos Pueblo is not a museum, nor is it a historical recreation – it is a place where people live, it is their home. So remember to treat the people and properties with respect. Don’t enter buildings unless they are marked as shops, or open to the public, and don’t photograph the people without asking their permission.

    Visitors are asked to abide by these rules:
    1. Please report, and pay the appropriate fee for, each camera you carry into the Pueblo area.
    2. Please respect the "restricted area" signs as they protect the privacy of our residents and the sites of our native religious practices.
    3. Do not enter doors that are not clearly marked as curio shops. Each home is privately owned and occupied by a family and is not a museum display to be inspected with curiosity.
    4. Please do not photograph members of our tribe without first asking permission.
    5. Absolutely no photography in San Geronimo Chapel.
    6. Do not enter the walls surrounding the ruins of the old church and our cemetery.
    7. Do not wade in our river -- our sole source of drinking water.

    +++Next tip!+++

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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  • goodfish's Profile Photo

    Rules and Regulations

    by goodfish Updated Sep 5, 2011

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    The pueblo isn't one of those recreated historical sites with people running about in period costume. It's still home to a small section of the Taos people and they're serious about how they expect you to behave in it. Even though I've mentioned most of them, here's the full list of rules from the website:

    1. Please report, and pay the appropriate fee for, each camera you carry into the Pueblo area.

    2. Please respect the "restricted area" signs as they protect the privacy of our residents and the sites of our native religious practices.

    3. Do not enter doors that are not clearly marked as curio shops. Each home is privately owned and occupied by a family and is not a museum display to be inspected with curiosity.

    4. Please do not photograph members of our tribe without first asking permission.

    5. Absolutely no photography in San Geronimo Chapel.

    6. Do not enter the walls surrounding the ruins of the old church and our cemetery.

    7. Do not wade in our river -- our sole source of drinking water.

    8. No photography allowed during ceremonies open to the public.

    Above all, remember that you are not just in someone else's home but inside a sovereign nation and subject to their tribal laws.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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  • goodfish's Profile Photo

    Photo Frustration

    by goodfish Updated Sep 5, 2011

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    Craft shop, Taos Pueblo
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    This can be both the best and worst place for shutterbugs. Some of the ancestral homes that have been converted to shops have placed signs and displays outside, and tables have been set up here and there to sell fry and horno-baked breads, cold beverages and traditional foods. I'm a lover of beautiful, traditional craft and appreciate the effort to share tribal cuisine and keep hot tourists hydrated but a huge, bright-orange cooler or contemporary display sign cluttering up the front of a 1000 year-old historical treasure rather spoils the effect? There was a great deal more of this on our last visit than on our first 8-9 years earlier.

    Shooting around some of this stuff created awkward frames of architecture I'd wanted to capture in all of its ageless grace. We'd also landed in there rather late in the day (small crisis with some dropped keys - don't ask) so I didn't have a lot of time to work out best angles. Whatever. Just be aware that if you're all excited about photo opportunities here, you might experience some similar frustrations. It would be nice if they'd restrict signage or set up one common market near the ticket booth. Oh well...

    The pueblo is best shot earlier or later in the day when the sun is at an angle.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Photography

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  • Taos Pueblo Speed Trap

    by freewheelingfranklin Written Aug 27, 2010

    Taos Pueblo, an Indian reservation just north of Taos, New Mexico, is a popular destination for those who want to see the Indian dwellings. However after paying $10 per person to see this, you will be targeted in an aggressive speed trap when leaving the reservation. It is about 2 miles to the reservation boundary, and this stretch is patrolled by two Taos Pueblo Police vehicles. Your ticket may be fictitious, but your only recourse will be to contest it in Tribal Court. Good luck!

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Taos Pueblo Warnings and Dangers

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