Fun things to do in Bronx

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Bronx

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    The Hall of Fame for Great Americans

    by apbeaches Written Nov 8, 2014

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    The Hall of Fame for Great Americans at Bronx Community College, the original "Hall of Fame" in this country, is a New York landmark institution founded in 1900. The Hall of Fame 630-foot open-air Colonnade
    to honor prominent Americans who have had a significant impact on this nation's history. The Hall of Fame was originated by Dr. Henry Mitchell MacCracken, Chancellor of New York University from 1891 to 1910, and was designed as part of the construction of an undergraduate college of that university. Built in a sweeping semicircular Neo-Classical arc with wings at either end, it provides a panorama across the Harlem River to the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park and beyond to the Palisades. It is a unique and patriotic reminder that this country's phenomenal growth has been due to the vitality, ingenuity, and intellect of these individuals.

    The 98 bronze busts are original works by distinguished American sculptors. The bronze tablets recessed in the wall beneath the busts carry inscriptions of significant statements made by those honored.The categories represented in the Hall of Fame are authors, educators, architects, inventors, military leaders, judges, theologians, philanthropists, humanitarians, scientists, statesmen, artists, musicians, actors, and explorers.

    The Hall of Fame for Great Americans is rich in history, unrivaled for its architecture, and serves as a focus for educational reinforcement and a stage for related programs and exhibits. The Hall of Fame is open to the public for self-guided tours daily, between the hours of 10:00am and 5:00pm and guided tours by appointment only. Admission is free for self-guided tours, but donations are encouraged.

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    Bartow Pell Mansion Museum

    by apbeaches Written Nov 8, 2014

    This mansion with Greek Revival interiors, is tucked away in a lovely, quiet corner of Pelham Bay Park – an area that was once home to more than 20 elegant country estates. As the only grand country house still in existence on Pelham Bay, it provides an important link to the social and architectural history of New York. We enjoyed a guided tour in costume of the mansion and view our impressive collection of mid-19th century furnishings with fine decorative arts and strolled around the grounds and the formal terraced garden behind the house.

    n May 1914, an impressive group of individuals passionate about horticulture founded the International Garden Club. In search of a home, they found the rundown property in the Bronx then known as "the old Bartow Mansion.group entered into a long-term lease with New York City in exchange for a promise to restore the mansion and manage the site. Thanks to these pioneers of historic preservation, the mansion was saved from the demise eventually inflicted on more than a dozen other grand country estates located along Long Island Sound’s Pelham Bay. In 2014 the Bartow-Pell Conservancy celebrates those farsighted founders and the legacy they preserved for future generations: the Bartow-Pell Mansion Museum and Gardens.

    This NYC Landmark listed on the National Register of Historic Places, Bartow-Pell Mansion Museum is owned by the City of New York Department of Parks & Recreation and is a member of the Historic House Registry. The space is frequently rented out for catered affairs.

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    City Island

    by apbeaches Written Nov 8, 2014

    City Island is a small island approximately 1.5 mile long x .5 mile wide. At one time incorporated within the boundaries of Pelham, in Westchester County, it is now part of the New York City borough of the Bronx. There are approximately 5,000 people living year round on City Island.

    City Island is located at the Originally inhabited by the Siwanoy band of Lenape Indians, City Island later was settled by Europeans as part of property and estate bought by English nobleman, Thomas Pell, in 1654. Prior to that, English settlers led by Anne Hutchinson (seeking religious freedom) settled in an area nearby on the river (now known as the Hutchinson River) in 1642. After changing hands it was bought by Benjamin Palmer of New York. Up to this point the island had been inhabited by only a few homes and farms. It had a population of about 1000 people, who tended farms and livestock. Palmer had the vision of developing the island into a port, which could rival that of New York. He knew that ships heading north and south passed City Island using Long Island Sound as a safe inshore waterway. He envisioned shipyards, and stores that could cater to the ships. He went as far as changing the name to City Island & having the island mapped out in different plots designated as shipyards, docks, business, farms, homes, schools, and houses of worship, along with streets and paths.

    Today City Island has the look and feel of a small New England fishing village, with no spot more than a few minutes' walking distance to the water. Most businesses are clustered along the central City Island Avenue. The island is most famous for its numerous seafood restaurants and antique stores, which line both sides of the avenue.

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    Wave Hill

    by apbeaches Written Nov 8, 2014

    Wave Hill is a 28 acre estate with public horticultural gardens and a cultural center, all situated on the slopes overlooking the Hudson River, with expansive views across the river to the New Jersey Palisades. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the estate includes two houses and a botanical garden. The oldest part of the main house, Wave Hill House, dates back to 1843; Glyndor House dates from 1927, and contains a multi-room art gallery. The special gradens include a perennial, cacuts, tropical, pergola, wild, aquatic, monocot, alpine, woodland forest. The gift shop contains many beautiful items for sale related to gardening and the Hudson River. The cafe provides light snacks and drinks. The manion can be rented for catered affairs.

    During the late 19th century and early 20th century, numerous highly notable people resided in Wave Hill, either because they owned it, leased it, or because they stayed there as guests. In 1960, the estate was given to NYC. Wave Hill is now garden, cultural center with constantly changing, contemporary visual arts exhibits in the Glyndor Gallery within Glyndor House, paid-ticket concert series take place on some Sunday afternoons in Armor Hall, featuring music that includes such styles as chamber music and jazz.

    The original Wave Hill House was a gray fieldstone mansion built in 1843 by lawyer William Lewis Morris. It was owned from 1866 to 1903 by publisher William Henry Appleton, who enlarged the house in between 1866 and 1869 and again in 1890, and added greenhouses and gardens to the grounds. During these years, the house was visited by Thomas Henry Huxley, who helped Charles Darwin bring evolution to the public's attention. Theodore Roosevelt's family rented Wave Hill during the summers of 1870 and 1871, and Mark Twain leased it from 1901 to 1903.The house was purchased in 1903 by Perkins, a partner of J. P. Morgan, along with adjacent property, including Glyndor, a house built by the Harriman family in 1888, which later burned down and was rebuilt in 1927. In 1910 Perkins added an underground building for recreation which included a bowling alley. Perkins performed extensive landscaping on the site, and leased Wave Hill House itself to an eminent ichthyologist, Bashford Dean of the American Museum of Natural History, who built a stone addition to the building as a private museum, Armor Hall. In 1960, at the suggestion of Robert Moses, the Perkins-Freeman family deeded Wave Hill to the City of New York. In 1983 the estate was added to the roster of the National Register of Historic Places. In 2005, Wave Hill received a grant from the Carnegie Corporation, which was made possible through a donation by New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg.

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    Hall of Fame

    by apbeaches Written Feb 2, 2014

    The Hall of Fame for Great Americans is rich in history, unrivaled for its architecture, and serves as a focus for educational reinforcement and a stage for related programs and exhibits. The Hall of Fame is open to the public for self-guided tours daily, between the hours of 10:00 am and 5:00 pm and guided tours by appointment only. Two weeks advance notice is suggested. Admission is free for self-guided tours, but a $2.00 donation per person is encouraged.

    The Hall of Fame for Great Americans at Bronx Community College, the original "Hall of Fame" in this country, is a New York landmark institution founded in 1900. This 630-foot open-air Colonnade honors prominent Americans who have had a significant impact on this nation's history. The Hall of Fame was originated by Dr. Henry Mitchell MacCracken, Chancellor of New York University from 1891 to 1910, and was designed as part of the construction of an undergraduate college of that university.

    Built in a sweeping semicircular Neo-Classical arc with wings at either end, it provides a panorama across the Harlem River to the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park and beyond to the Palisades. It is a unique and patriotic reminder that this country's phenomenal growth has been due to the vitality, ingenuity, and intellect of these individuals.

    The principal feature of the Hall of Fame is its 630-foot open-air Colonnade, which houses the bronze portrait busts of the honorees. Designed by the celebrated architect Stanford White and financed by a gift from Mrs. Finley J. Shepard (Helen Gould) to New York University, the Hall of Fame was formally dedicated on May 30, 1901.
    Alexander Graham Bell (1847 - 1922)
    Eli Whitney (1765 - 1825)
    George Westinghouse (1846 - 1914)
    The complex of three buildings adjoining the Colonnade-Gould Memorial Library, the Hall of Languages, and Cornelius Baker Hall of Philosophy-were also designed by Stanford White and bear a close conceptual relationship to the Colonnade, with the library as the central focus. These three buildings were among the first constructed on the University Heights campus-Language Hall (1894), Gould Memorial Library (1899), and Philosophy Hall (1912).

    The Colonnade was designed with niches to accommodate 102 sculptured works and currently houses the busts and commemorative plaques of 98 of the 102 honorees elected since 1900.

    The 98 bronze busts that line the Colonnade are original works by distinguished American sculptors. The bronze tablets recessed in the wall beneath the busts carry inscriptions of significant statements made by the men and women honored. Among the master sculptors represented here are Daniel Chester French, sculptor of the Lincoln Memorial; James Earl Fraser, whose work includes the figures of “Justice” and “Law” for the U.S. Supreme Court, and Frederick MacMonnies, whose reliefs grace Fifth Avenue’s Washington Arch. The Hall of Fame’s 98 portrait busts have been called “the largest and finest collection of bronze busts anywhere in our country.” The categories of occupation or endeavor represented in the Hall of Fame are authors, educators, architects, inventors, military leaders, judges, theologians, philanthropists, humanitarians, scientists, statesmen, artists, musicians, actors, and explorers.

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    Watch Dominican's Being Made in the Bronx

    by atufft Written Nov 3, 2013

    Cigar factories are almost non-existent except in Cuba, Dominican Republic, Honduras, and a few other places in Latin America. I've spent precious travel time trying to find these sweat shops in Honduras, and have been somewhat disappointed. The Bronx is deep in immigrants from Puerto Rico and Dominican Republic, and so in Little Italy Market there is a vendor of cigars called La Casa Grande Cigars. This vendor has three Dominicans rolling cigars right in front of you, so you can skip the cigar factory in Latin America. The tobacco is premium aged product from Honduras and Cuba mostly. There's a humidor where you can choose the cigars you want to buy, ranging from $5 to $15 each. I bought about $50- worth of cigars for my friends who like this habit. Check out Arthur Avenue Cigars too, which is just next door. Both companies have websites

    La Casa Grande Cigars in Bronx, NYC Selection of La Casa Grande Cigars La Casa Grande Cigars in Bronx, NYC La Casa Grande Cigars in Bronx, NYC
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    Walk Arthur Avenue--Little Italy

    by atufft Written Nov 3, 2013

    Arthur Avenue is well known to those in the Bronx as Little Italy. For years, this enclave had declined, but recently it's been revived, and now one will find New Yorkers from Manhattan and Brooklyn coming to stroll this stretch of Arthur Ave between East 182nd and and East 188th Streets. This is a great place to walk the dog because there are several sidewalk cafes that serve coffee, pastry, or pizza. At D'Auria-Murphy Triangle, old men play board games near the statue of Columbus. Little Italy Marketplace is a small market of vendors selling meats, cigars, and other things Italian. Pizza prices here are lower than elsewhere in town.

    Christopher Columbus in Little Italy, Bronx Little Italy Marketplace in Bronx, NY Little Italy Marketplace in Bronx, New York
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    Bronx County Building

    by moiraistyx Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The most notable feature of the Bronx County Building is its Veteran's Memorial Hall. The hall is located on the 1st floor of the building and a memorial to the men from the Bronx who fought in the Spanish-American War and World War One. Here you will also find a collection of murals by James Monroe Hewlett which illustrate the settlement of the area by Jonas Bronk, how the courts were established, the Battle of Pells Point and how the British were defeated and lastly George Washington's recptions at Van Cortlandt Mansion.

    The building itself is a limestone structure built in in 1933 and designed by architects Joseph Freedlander and Max Hausle. Adolph Weinman designed the block sculptures located and the entrances of the building and the friezes were desinged by Charles Keck.

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    Yankee Stadium

    by Icemaiden02 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    A trip to New York City cannot be complete without visiting Yankee Stadium, home of the New York Yankees, located in the Bronx. Tickets are available, starting at $10 in the bleachers. Beware scalpers outside the stadium, numerous fake tickets abound! Food within the stadium can be pricey ($3 for a hotdog, $8 for a beer, and $4.50 for frozen lemonade), so come with a full belly.

    The first night game was played on May 28, 1946. Yankee Stadium is often referred to as "The House that Ruth Built", but usually as simply "The Stadium". It was the first baseball park to be labeled a "Stadium" rather than a "Field," a "Park," or a "Grounds," and it conformed to the usage of the term in ancient Greece, where a stadium was a foot-race arena.

    Several rules exist as of Sept 11th:
    No video cameras
    No backpacks
    No briefcases
    No large bags
    No coolers
    No bottles or cans

    Security is strict, they will not allow you in with any of the above.

    Yankees pitcher, Mariano Riviera; taken May 2005 Yankees captain, Derek Jeter; taken May 2005
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  • The Mecca of Baseball

    by Digi Updated Apr 4, 2011

    Yankee Stadium, home of the legendary New York Yankees. For any baseball fan, this is hallowed ground, and even if you don't like baseball it's a central part of New York City and America as so many heroes of the American pastime have roamed the field here.

    There's nothing like watching the Yankees defeat yet another opponent on a warm summer day. For those of you coming for some history, make sure to get to the stadium early so that you can tour Monument Park (behind Left field), where all the Yankee greats are honored.

    Among the best seats to watch the game in are the bleachers. While they are not super comfortable, they are a bargain at $8. Just make sure to not wear any Red Sox gear, or expect to get taunted like crazy.

    A little warning though, some fans can be rowdy, especially after they get some alcohol in them. But they are mostly harmless, as long as you don't argue with them.

    The House that Ruth Built
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    Wave Hill

    by travelfrosch Written Mar 30, 2009

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    And now for something completely different, make your way to the extreme northwest part of the Bronx, to the posh Riverdale section of town. Along the Hudson River is a storied estate known as Wave Hill. This place has seen many famous residents, including Theodore Roosevelt and Mark Twain. The estate has breathtaking views, lovely flowers, pleasant walking paths, and notable architecture to enjoy. If you're hungry, you can get a light snack at the cafeteria, or you can bring a picnic lunch, as long as you enjoy it in the picnic area just outside of Glyndor House. Or just stroll around the grounds and take in the scenery, as more than a few locals do on a regular basis.

    Admission to the site costs $6 per person. Annual memberships are available for purchase starting at $40. Parking on the site costs $8 per car per day (no overnight parking allowed).

    Glyndor House, Wave Hill Sara at Wave Hill House Sara admires the Pergola Overlook view View from the estate Sara stops to smell the flowers
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    The Bronx Zoo

    by travelfrosch Updated Mar 7, 2009

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    And I thought when they mentioned "The Bronx Zoo," it was just a colorful way to describe my workplace.

    Pleasantly situated in Bronx Park, the zoo gives you a chance to see a very large collection of animals from all around the world. Snow Leopards and Polar Bears are big attractions, but the biggest camera hams are almost certainly the sea lions. Check out the monkeys while you're at it.

    Admission is $15 for adults, $11 for children aged 3-12, and $13 for Seniors aged 65 and up. Admission on Wednesdays is "pay what you wish" (allowing poorer residents to visit the zoo). But if you had enough money to buy a plane ticket to New York, you probably should pay the full entry fee anyway. Parking costs $12.

    The zoo is open 365 days a year, opening hours vary with season.

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    BRONX ZOO

    by moiraistyx Updated Feb 10, 2009

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    My very first trip here was when I was eleven years old. My Aunt Dody brought me, my brother and my sister here while my mom was out of town for work. Even then this wonderful zoo amazed me. The modern Bronx Zoo is even more fantastic. They have added dozens of exhibits over the years and they continue to add them every year. This year they have added the African Dogs exhibit.

    The summer hours for the zoo are 10:00-5:00 weekdays, and 10:00-5:30 weekends and holidays. Admission is $15 adults and $11 children (2-12) and $13.00 for seniors Thursday-Tuesday. The zoo is by donation on Wednesday. I do not recommend going to the zoo on Wednesdays due to the large crowds. The extra exhibits inside the zoo are at an additional fee, these are the Skysafar, Bug Carousel, Shuttle, Camel Rides, Butterfly Garden, Gorilla Congo, and the Monorail. The fees for these extras vary so please see the website for specifics. You can buy a POP pass which includes all the extras, see the website for details. If you plan to visit the Bronx Zoo several times or if you plan to visit any of the other zoos in the NYC area or even the NY Aquarium, you may want to consider purchasing a membership.

    One of our favorite areas to visit in the zoo is the aviary. Patrick loves the birds, especially the really large ones. When we went this past spring we were able to see the absolutely adorable gorilla babies, as well as many other animal babies. I love the butterfly garden myself, although I have to admit its incredibly hot inside of it, but beautiful.

    Giraffe Butterflies Lion Snake Monkey
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    BRONX ZOO-HOLIDAY LIGHTS/WINTER

    by moiraistyx Updated Feb 10, 2009

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    A couple of weekends ago, I went to the Bronx Zoo with my son Patrick and one of his friends from school and her dad (also Patrick) and little brother Benjamin. We had such a great time. One of the nice things about going to the Bronx Zoo in the later fall is that the crowds really aren't crowds. We had little or no difficulty checking out all our favorite exhibits. One of our favorites was the Poloar Bears. They seemed to be right at home in the crisp fall air.

    The best thing about going this time of year is the chance to see the Holiday Lights at the zoo. As the sun sets on the animals and visitors, light displays all over the zoo begin to light up. Of course they had the usual drummer boys and gift boxes, but they also had light display of the animals living at the zoo.

    We also visited the Children's Zoo after dark and were treated to an absolutely fantastic story teller. The children were mesmerized by the story about the hedge hog that didn't want to sleep and the mice by the edge. Most of all they loved the song "The Twelve Days of Diving". Patrick was still singing the song today while he took his bath.

    Entrance fees to the Bronx Zoo have gone higher in the last year, but for me it's worth it. I buy a yearly membership since Patrick and I travel down to the zoo several times a year.
    Entrance fees are:

    $15.00 for an adult, $13.00 for seniors and $11.00 for children.

    If you are already at the zoo you do not need to pay a separate fee to view the Holiday Lights, otherwise the fee to see the Holiday Lights is the same as a regular zoo entrance fee.

    Polar Bear enjoying the chill. Red Panda snuggling up. Snow Leopard taking a snooze. Patrick and Mallory on the Bug Carosal Patrick giving Benjamin a kiss.
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    Bartow-Pell Mansion Museum and Gardens

    by moiraistyx Written Sep 5, 2008

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    This museum and gardens is absolutely beautiful. It's located on 9 acres in the Pelham Bay Park. Visitors can chose to explore the museum, the carriage house or simply to picnic on the grounds. The carriage house is a great representation of affluent and elegant country living of the middle 19th century. The museum has an extensive collection of historic artifacts which makes it possible for visitors to take a look back at the social history of those who worked and lived on the estate during the Civil War era and the immediate decades surrounding it. I almost forget to mention the carriage house pool. The Bartow-Pell Mansion is a national landmark. There is an admission fee to tour the mansion but it won't break the bank: $5 for Adults, $3 for Seniors and students and children under 6 are free. You can tour the mansion Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 4. The mansion is closed on the following holidays Christmas, New Year's Day, Easter, July 4th and Thanksgiving. The carriage house is open April thru October and the grounds and gardens are open from 8:30 AM to dusk daily, there is no fee to use the grounds. See the website for a complete listing of the special events and programs offered here.

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Bronx Hotels

See all 9 Hotels in Bronx
  • Days Inn Yankee Stadium / Bronx

    997 Brook Ave., Bronx, New York, 10451, United States

    Satisfaction: Very Good

    Good for: Solo

  • Econo Lodge Bronx

    1000 Baychester Avenue, Bronx, New York, 10475, United States

    Satisfaction: Very Good

    Good for: Solo

  • Howard Johnson Bronx

    1922 Boston Road, Bronx, New York, 10460, United States

    Satisfaction: Poor

    Good for: Business

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Bronx Things to Do

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