Central Park, New York City

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  • Dutchnatasja's Profile Photo

    Don't miss the Wollman skating rink!

    by Dutchnatasja Updated Nov 2, 2004

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    Wollman skating rink is one of the most famous rinks in New York City. It is located in Central Park. The rink opened in 1950 following a gift from Mrs Wollman, but is now in the hands of Donald Trump. He took it over in 1986 and put serious money into renovating the rink. During the winter holiday season, tourists flock to skate on the famous ice rink. Ice skating lasts until the second week in April; afterward, Wollman becomes a roller rink. The rink looks superb, with an excellent view of the New York midtown skyline. If you don’t want to skate (there can be long waiting lines) then it is fun to watch people skate.

    Wollman Skating rink - Central Park
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    • Adventure Travel
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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    Sheep Meadow in Central Park

    by Christophe_Ons Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Sheep Meadow today is a 15-acre, lush, green meadow for relaxing and admiring one of New York City's greatest skyline views. The sheep and a shepherd were initially housed in a fanciful Victorian building - part of what is now the Tavern on the Green restaurant – on the western perimeter of the Park. Twice a day the shepherd stopped traffic on the west drive so that the flock could travel to and from their meadow. The rural idyll continued until 1934, when the flock was transferred to Prospect Park in Brooklyn and the sheepfold became a restaurant.
    In the 60s/70s thousands of people were attracted to Sheep Meadow for large-scale concerts. The first landing on the moon was televised to a large crowd in the meadow on July 20, 1969. These events, and the lack of maintenance, severely eroded the lawn. Sheep Meadow was the first area in Central Park to be restored. Events moved to nearby, more suitable or resilient locations. Sheep Meadow reopened in 1981 as a swath of green dedicated to sunbathers, picnickers, and kite flyers.
    On the northern edge of Sheep Meadow, just outside its fence, is Lilac Walk. Along the walk are 23 varieties of lilacs from around the world. The Center Drive, slightly further on, offers volleyball and the "skate circle" – the setting for serious roller-skating and disco skating.

    How to get there :
    take the 1 or 9 train to 66th St / Lincoln Center and walk 1 block east to Central Park West, walk into the park (along the Tavern On The Green) and you'll see Sheep Meadow across the West Drive.
    (You could also take the B or C train if you're not near the 1/9, to either Columbus Circle at 59th St , or to 72nd St; and walk along Central Park West to the Park entrance at 66th St.)

    Skyline view from Sheep Meadow in Central Park

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    A great view across the Central Park Reservoir

    by Christophe_Ons Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Reservoir, which covers a large area of Central Park from east to west and from 86th Street to 96th Street, was constructed between 1858 and 1862. It is probably best known for the 1.58 mile track surrounding it, where thousands of runners who tone up there every day. The Reservoir itself (named the Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Reservoir in 1994) contributes significantly to the environmental pleasure of the "run," particularly in the summer when water evaporation from its surface cools the air.

    The unsightly seven-foot chain-link fence surrounding the Reservoir, which was erected in 1926, obscured joggers' and pedestrians' views of the magnificent Manhattan skyline. In 2003, the Conservancy completed the installation of a new Reservoir fence, made of steel with cast-iron ornamentation, closely resembling the original historic fence that was in place from 1864 to 1926. The new four-foot-high fence, installed on the existing eight-inch granite coping stone, has opened up breathtaking views of Central Park and the Manhattan skyline.

    How to get there :
    take the subway train 4,5 or 6 to east 86th St at Lexington Avenue. Walk west toward central park (3 blocks) and then follow Fifth Avenue north toward the Park entrance at 90th St (4 blocks). Climb the stairs and enjoy the stunning view from the Reservoir and the Upper West Side, as seen in the picture here. (note : the buildings in the middle are the San Remo apartment towers)

    nearby Museums along Fifth Avenue ("Museum Mile") : Cooper-Hewitt Museum at 91st St, National Academy of Design at 90th St, Solomon Guggenheim at 88th St, Neue Gallerie at East 86th St, and the vast Metropolitan Museum of Art (between 83rd and 80th St).

    The Upper West Side - a view across the Reservoir path along the Reservoir in Central Park view across the Reservoir San Remo apartments on the upper west side view across the Reservoir
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits

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    Central Park's Lake

    by Christophe_Ons Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    At 22 acres, the Lake is Central Park's largest body of water excluding the Reservoir. Because of the many twists and turns in its shoreline, however, it seems much larger. Architects Olmsted and Vaux created the Lake out of a large swamp; they intended it to provide boating in the summer and ice skating in the winter. In December 1858, while the rest of Central Park was under construction, the Lake was opened for ice-skating. The opening happened to coincide with a long string of hard winters in the City and sparked an instant craze for the sport. According to one account in the Park's Annual Report, as many as 40,000 people skated on the Lake in one day. Nature couldn't always be counted on to satisfy the demand for good ice, so Wollman Rink was opened in 1951 and the Lake closed for skating.

    Location : Mid- Central Park from 71st to 78th Streets

    How to get there :
    Take the Central Park entrance at West 72nd St ( to get there, take the B or C train to 72nd St - or you can take take the 1/2/3 or 9 train to 72nd St at Broadway and then walk 2 blocks east) . You enter the park at Strawberry Fields. Walk a bit further into the park and you'll see the Lake on your left side.

    other nearby spots in Central Park :
    -Bow Bridge
    -Strawberry Fields (also the site of the "Imagine" monument in honour of John Lennon)
    -Cherry Hill
    -Bethesda Terrace

    As you enter the park, also note the "Dakota" building which is on Central Park West at 72nd St - this is where John Lennon was shot.

    Central Park - boating on the Lake Central Park - the Lake

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  • mikelisaanna's Profile Photo

    Cleopatra's Needle

    by mikelisaanna Updated Nov 16, 2007

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    Cleopatra's needle is an ancient Egyptian obelisk that stands in Central Park behind the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Its sides are covered with inscriptions written in hieroglyphics. The heiroglyphics on three of the sides are in good shapre, while the ones on the western side have been worn down by the wind and rain over the years.

    The obelisk is about 80 feet tall and was originally created around 1450 BC in the ancient Egyptian city of Heliopolis. It was later moved to Alexandria during the Roman Empire. In 1881, the obelisk was moved to its current location in Central Park, after it was given to the United States as a gift from the ruler of Egypt.

    One unusual feature of the obelisk are the crabs (or maybe they are lobsters) which are located on the base at its corners. Not the sort of creatures that you would expect to see on a massive piece of Egyptian sculpture!

    Cleopatra's Needle in Central Park Cleopatra's Needle's base with its crustaceans
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • Dutchnatasja's Profile Photo

    Take time for the Sax Player.

    by Dutchnatasja Updated Jan 13, 2005

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    Every time when I’m in New York I go see the Sax Player in Central Park. This time in December he played Christmas songs. Although it was cold, we sit down and listen to his music. Many people walk by and ignore him, I just can’t. He has given our visit to the Park some extra charm. As a reward I gave him a few dollars. So the next time you’ll see him, take a minute to listen to his music. I think he will appreciate that.

    The Sax Player in Central Park
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  • rmlopez74's Profile Photo

    Rowboats in the Park!

    by rmlopez74 Written Apr 26, 2006

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    Don't forget to visit the boat house in Central Park. I know, rowing a boat around the lake sounds a lot more like work than fun, but trust me, it is worth breaking a little sweat. The view from the lake is awesome. You see tons of turtles and waterfowl. Plus, to be in such a peaceful setting in the midst of NY City is quite an experience. Definitely take the time.

    Serenity Now!
    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Birdwatching

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  • Birsen's Profile Photo

    Central Park

    by Birsen Written Jun 3, 2005

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    My favorite children's book : Alice in Wonderland.
    Sculptor: José de Creeft 1884-1982 • Spain
    Gift of publisher and philanthropist
    George Delacorte (1893-1991)
    in honor of his late wife, Margarita
    Visitors from all over the world stop to marvel
    at the larger than life size sculpture of Alice,
    from Lewis Carroll's 1865 fantasy classic
    Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Here in
    Central Park she sits high upon a giant
    mushroom overlooking the Conservatory Water
    and presiding over an eternal tea party to
    which she has invited all the children of the
    world.

    Alice is in Central Park

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  • Vintom's Profile Photo

    Meet the Mayor of Central Park

    by Vintom Updated Oct 15, 2003

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    We met a man by the lake in central park. Alberto Arroya was the mans real name, but all the joggers passing by knew him as the Mayor and would shout out their greeting using this name.
    Alberto told us he had got this name due to his connection with the park, where it is claimed he invented jogging in it's modern day form. Apparently he had been jogging in Central Park for the last 68 years.
    He started jogging to improve his fitness as a young boxer and just kept doing it. I don't know why, but while talking to him I kept thinking about the film Forrest Gump! Run Forrest, run!
    Whats more, over the years Arroya had been the friend of Jackie Onasis and Madonna to name but a few of the many famous people, who at one time, or another, have used the park for jogging.

    Arroya was that well known for his jogging in the park, that he even had a citation from the city to acknowledge his part in the phenomenon, that is today, the most practised form of keep fit around the World.
    You had to give it to the old boy, he had been running around this park for the last 68 years and was still at it, although at a somewhat slower pace these days. And there was Toby and I, who couldn't run a bath between us, never mind all the way around the lake at just under two miles!

    The Mayor of Central Park

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    Watch a Ball game for free!

    by Vintom Updated Oct 15, 2003

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    Why pay big bucks to go and watch a baseball game, if like me you don't really understant it anyway! Why not take a stroll through central park and watch the kids playing for free. A fun filled activity to keep you entertained for a while as you walk around cntral park at the wekend. Weather permitting of course.

    Baseball in Central Park

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  • mizzzthanggg's Profile Photo

    Romeo & Juliet in Central Park

    by mizzzthanggg Written Jul 5, 2005

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    There were just so many wonderful things to discover in Central Park... but this was one of my favourite finds... a lovely little sculpture of Romeo and Juliet, a gift of George Delacorte if I can make out the engraving on the photo.

    romeo & juliet, central park nyc
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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  • rmdw's Profile Photo

    The Northern part of Central Park

    by rmdw Written Aug 23, 2003

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    Many tourists who venture into Central Park seem to stick to the far southern section of the park. But if you venture further north (see my transportation tip for one idea how) there are many treasures to discover.

    This photo was taken from the eastern part of the lake, looking toward the Upper West Side.

    Central Park -
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Cycling

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  • darthmilmo's Profile Photo

    Central Park

    by darthmilmo Written Oct 26, 2002

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    Visit the beautiful Central Park to detoxify yourself from the vast concrete jungle of the city. Who would have thought such a simple plan as a park in the middle of the city would work? The designers of this park imitated the grandeur of several parks in Europe and abroad. The result is a great place to spend a day relaxing and enjoying nature. A few hours may be enough for some, but for people that want to walk from North to South or vice-versa then a day will be required. I didn't even manage to cover the entire park in a day, but I did cross it from the north to the south. It's so huge! For more information and to download a map of the park take a look at the official central park webpage at http://centralparknyc.org/

    Central Park

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    Central Park: The Blockhouse

    by darthmilmo Written Oct 26, 2002

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    There are few remnants of the War of 1812 in New York City. Perhaps one of the most unique remnants is the Blockhouse at Central Park. Many of the other buildings of that time have been replaced by modern counterparts, however, the Blockhouse still stands tall as a reminder of the battle against England. In those times, there was no professional soldiers available to protect Manhattan so common persons from all over, including lawyers, politicians, peasants, farmers, and beggars, came together as one to built impromptu buildings to protect the island against the invaders. You can even notice the unique and unskilled craftsmanship involved in the construction of this building. The American flag standing atop the building makes for a nice token of nationalism.

    Central Park: The Blockhouse

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    Central Park: The Reservoir

    by darthmilmo Written Oct 26, 2002

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    No matter where you are coming from, if you cross the entire area of Central Park, from north to south or vice-versa, you are bound to come across the Reservoir. This is the largest late of the park. Unfortunately, the lake itself is off-limits, however, there is a running/walking trail around the lake.

    Central Park: The Reservoir

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