Riverside Park, New York City

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  • Eleanor Roosevelt Monument, NYC, November 2009
    Eleanor Roosevelt Monument, NYC,...
    by von.otter
  • Eleanor Roosevelt Monument, NYC, November 2009
    Eleanor Roosevelt Monument, NYC,...
    by von.otter
  • Firemen’s Memorial; Riverside Park, NYC, 11/09
    Firemen’s Memorial; Riverside Park, NYC,...
    by von.otter
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    Honoring NY’s Fallen from the Civil War

    by von.otter Updated Nov 8, 2010
    Soldiers��� and Sailors��� Memorial Monument, 11/09
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    “It sure has been a pleasure for us to broadcast for the sailors and soldiers.”
    — Bob Hope (1903-2003)

    The Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Memorial Monument honors Union Army soldiers and sailors who served in America’s War Between the States. Located at 89th Street and Riverside Drive in Riverside Park on Manhattan’s Upper West Side it was dedicated on Memorial Day, 1902. Originally the Memorial was meant to be sited at Fifty-ninth Street and Fifth Avenue. In 1899, New York Governor Theodore Roosevelt laid the cornerstone of the monument.

    The white marble design of architects Charles W. (1860-1944) and Arthur A. (1867-1955) Stoughton won a 1893 public competition. Their design was known as the “Temple of Fame.” Paul E. DuBoy carved the monument’s ornamental features.

    The Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Memorial is in the shape of a 96-foot high Greek temple, patterned after the Choragic Monument of Lysicrates in Athens. It is raised on a high base, ringed by twelve Corinthian columns. The plinths at the entrance (see photo #4) to the terrace are carved with the names of the New York State’s volunteer regiments and the battles in which they served, as well as Union generals.

    To the south of the monument are two mounted cannons, and to the west, the steps of the terraces offer views of the Hudson River. The New York Landmark Commission designated the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument a landmark in 2001. The monument has become a shrine for all those who have served in later wars as well, and is the site of an annual Memorial Day observance.

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    Honoring New York City’s Bravest

    by von.otter Updated Jan 13, 2010

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    Firemen���s Memorial; Riverside Park, NYC, 11/09
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    Riverside Park is a treasure trove waiting to be discovered; among its great offerings is the Firemen’s Memorial. Located at 100th Street and Riverside Drive, it honors the city’s many firemen who lost their lives in the line of duty. Such a memorial was first proposed by Bishop Henry Cadman Potter in 1908 at the funeral of Deputy Fire Chief Charles W. Kruger.

    New York’s Board of Estimate granted $40,000 toward the project; and more than $50,000 was raised through private donations. Sculptor Attilio Piccirilli and architect Harold Van Buren Magonigle were commissioned to design the memorial; this team also worked on the Maine Monument at the Columbus Circle entrance to Central Park.

    Completed in 1912, the memorial stands 19-foot wide and 8-foot deep on a granite plaza, with a fountain and basin at its base. Facing Riverside Park a bronze bas-relief shows three galloping horses pulling a fire engine (see photo #3). At either end marble, allegorical sculptural groupings illustrate the firefighter’s motto, “Duty and Sacrifice;” Sacrifice on the north end, Duty on the south. The figure of Duty (see photo #4) is a mother seated next to a fire hydrant; she holds a fire helmet and raincoat across her lap as she shelters her naked, young. Sacrifice portrays a woman with the body of her husband, a fireman killed in the line of duty, draped across her lap. Benches surround the monument; a broad staircase of shallow steps leads into the park.

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    Honoring a First Lady

    by von.otter Updated Nov 10, 2009

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    Eleanor Roosevelt Monument, NYC, November 2009
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    “Friendship with oneself is all-important, because without it one cannot be friends with anyone else in the world.”
    — Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962)

    Riverside Park is a neighborhood park on Manhattan’s West Side; its many treasures await discovery by the city’s residents and its visitors alike. Among its great offerings is the Eleanor Roosevelt Monument. Located at the southern entrance to Riverside Park at West 72nd Street and Riverside Drive this eight-foot bronze honors America’s first ambassador to the United Nations.

    Artist Penelope Jencks designed the $1.14 million Eleanor Roosevelt Monument, the first public sculpture of a president’s wife in the United States and only the second public statue of an American woman in New York City.

    Planning for the Eleanor Roosevelt Monument began in 1986. At the dedication ceremony on October 5, 1996, Mrs. Roosevelt’s grandson, Franklin D. Roosevelt III and other Roosevelt family members attended. First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton gave the keynote address.

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  • iam1wthee's Profile Photo

    Riverside Park

    by iam1wthee Written May 30, 2009

    Stretches from 59th street to 158th street and riverside drive.

    Sundays in June they have FREE dance classes on Pier 70th street
    They have FREE exercise classes and offer kayaking
    Sometimes concerts, movies, cabarets, and plays from spring to early fall
    The views of the water are very calming.

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    Riverside Drive

    by yooperprof Written May 3, 2006

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    late winter view
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    Riverside Drive is a nice place for a walk or a bike ride when you're on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. Be forewarned: there are actually a few hills here! Riverside of course overlooks the Hudson to the west, although in most place the view down to the river is obscured by some pretty dense woodcover. Apartment and condo blocks line the other side of Riverside Drive.

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    Hungarian Hero Kossuth

    by yooperprof Updated Apr 28, 2006

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    I'm talking to _you_!
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    Riverside Drive on the Upper West Side is home to a number of interesting statues that can be found either on the river-side or the building-side of the parkway. It makes this beautiful part of New York even more interesting for a leisurely stroll.

    Count Kossuth was a great Hungarian patriot, on the "founding fathers" who paved the way for Hungarian autonomy in the mid-19th century. In 1848, he rode a wave of national pride and helped chase the Austrians out of Budapest. For a while, it seemed as if Hungary might win complete independence, but the Russians intervened and crushed the nationalist revolt. Kossuth fled the country, and lived most of the next 15 years in London. In 1851, he embarked on an American tour, starting here in New York City when he received a triumphant hero's welcome. Hence this commemoration.

    Kossuth achieved a great Magyar dream when Hungary was granted equivalent status with Austria in 1867: the so-called Dual Monarchy.

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    A beautiful green space on the Upper West Side

    by londonlover Written Jun 11, 2005

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    Riverside Park, 91st St Garden

    Riverside Park runs from 72nd to 158th Streets along the Hudson River on the Upper West Side. Steep hills and lush vegetation grow in a semi-wild state here, and several interlacing paths entertain kids, runners, and casual tourists. Best of all, a community-tended garden at 91st Street is a beautiful section of the park. And if you are familiar with the Tom Hanks movie "You've Got Mail," you'll recognize this spot as the setting of the lovely final scene!

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    Riverside Park

    by Birsen Updated Jun 3, 2005

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    79th street boat basin

    Riverside Park is Manhattan's most spectacular waterfront park, stretching four miles from 72nd to 158th Streets along the Hudson River. Since 1875, the landscapes of Frederick Law Olmsted have offered escape from the city and opportunities for people of all incomes to relax, play and socialize in tranquil settings. His design for Riverside Drive made it is one of the most beautiful boulevards in the world, affording views of the Hudson River along its serpentine route.

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    Union Theological Seminary

    by mrclay2000 Updated Apr 9, 2005

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    Union Theological Seminary from Sakura Park

    Across the street from the Riverside Church is a series of buildings that included with the cathedral give these blocks that medieval tone. Founded in 1836 but not built here until 1910, the Union Theological Seminary boasts several Gothic structures. Some of these are the fancy towers with all the Gothic details, and others are mere two- and three-story outbuildings of stone with severely modest windows (as if glass were ultraexpensive), exactly like one might see on a 14th century campus. Certain buildings are closed to outsiders and non-scholars, but the views from the street are free.

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    Riverside Church

    by mrclay2000 Written Apr 9, 2005

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    images of Riverside Church

    Though begun in the 1920s, the Riverside Church appears as if it emerged from the Middle Ages. Based on the cathedral at Chartres (except for the near-400-foot tower), this gigantic cathedral gives a positive medieval flavor to the neighborhood. Everything here is pure Gothic. The arched doorways; the stone-inlaid windows; the outbuildings; the flanges and gargoyles; the whole package. If security personnel and the worship schedule permit a visit to the sanctuary your eyes will continue to feast on stained glass, handsome chandeliers, arched windows and a continuing foray of Gothic features. The church also has a gift shop and a restroom for those venturing this far north of Central Park.

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  • A Slice of Wildlife in Manhattan

    by Gracejoy Written Dec 16, 2004

    If you visit Manhattan during spring, summer, or fall, don't miss a chance to visit the Riverside Park Bird Sanctuary. It's in Riverside Park (west "coast" of Manhattan) between 116th and 120th streets, and there is a relatively rustic nature trail that takes you right through it. If you're quiet and patient, you can spot some beautiful birds (there's a signpost with photos and information about the birds to guide you) and enjoy a moment of seclusion and nature in the middle of the big city. This area is not well known except to locals, so you will not be surrounded by crowds or tourists. (The location of the Bird Sanctuary makes it a perfect place to visit if you're in the neighborhood visiting Columbia University and/or Cathedral of St. John the Divine and/or Riverside Park.

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  • jessicadf's Profile Photo

    Take a walk through Riverside Park

    by jessicadf Written May 20, 2003

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    Will they be moths or butterflies?

    On a beautiful Spring day, Riverside Park was lush, green and full of life. People were walking their dogs, running, biking or simply strolling. Out of the corner of my eye, as we walked Brad's dog, Dexter, I noticed a web on a tree. Caterpillars!

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    CARILLON RIVERSIDE CHURCH.....

    by eden_teuling Written Mar 29, 2003

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    CARILLON INFO

    This carillion was a gift by the late John D. Rockefeller jr. in memory of his mother.

    It contains 74 bronze bells ranging in weight from the 20-ton (18 metric) Bourdon (hour bell) to the smallest bell of 10 pounds (4,5 kg).

    The Bourdon is the largest and heaviest carillon bell ever cast. The total weight of all the bells is over 100 tons (91 metric)

    When installed at The Park Baptist Church in 1925 by Gillett & Johnston Foundry of England, it was already the world's largest carillon with 53 bells and a bourdon of 10 tons.

    When it moved here with the congregation, in 1930, it was enlarged by Gillett & Johnston to become the first carillon to surpass five musical octages; it is still the only carillon to have achieved a bourdon of pitch C, a full octave below the normal range for a carillon.

    In 1956, the upper range of bells was replaced by the Van Bergen Foundry of The Netherlands.

    The Laura Spellman-Rockefeller Memorial Tower rises 392 feet (119 m) above the street.
    It is equipped with observation platforms for the carillon and for the 360-degree view of the City and the Hudson valley.
    Witin the bell chamber are the Machine Room and the Clavier Cabin.
    The Machine Room houses equippment for automatic operations.
    5 of the large bells are installed for swinging by means of wheels and motors.
    Swinging peals sound before Worship Services and on special ocassions.
    During the day a drum mechanism automatically plays the Parcival Quarters arranged from the Holy Grale Motiv in Wagner's opera Parcival, the Bourdon sounds the hours.

    Through the windows of the Clavier Cabin may be seen the carillon keyboard.
    It consists of wooden levers played with the hands and paddels played by the feet; each is attached directly to a clapper.
    All the bells are playable by direct action of the carillonneur, with no electronic gadgetry;

    RIVERSIDE CHURCH IS OPEN: DAILY FROM 9am - 4pm.
    CARILLON CONCERTS: SUNDAY AT NOON AND 3 pm.

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    UPPER WEST SIDE: Babe Ruth Lived Here

    by vtnyc Written Apr 4, 2005

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    Pass by here on your way to Riverside Park

    345 West 88th

    Between Riverside Drive and West End Avenue

    Steps from Riverside Park and it's attractions like the "You've Got Mail Garden" and the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial.

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