Brooklyn Bridge, New York City

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  • Brooklyn Bridge
    by Tijavi
  • Time to turn around
    Time to turn around
    by PinkFloydActuary
  • Brooklyn Bridge, New York
    Brooklyn Bridge, New York
    by antistar
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    Brooklyn Bridge

    by antistar Written Jun 6, 2013
    Brooklyn Bridge, New York
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    They call it the Bends. It's not as if Brooklyn Bridge invented the condition - they'd known about it for centuries, but it was here that decompression sickness entered the public imagination. The construction of what was then the longest suspension bridge in the world was a mammoth undertaking and extremely dangerous. It cost the life of its designer and disabled his son who took over with a case of the bends in one of the many caissons that were used to construct the bridge.

    A caisson is a pressurised structure that pushes out water and allows workers to operate below the surface of the river - vital in the deep and powerful East River. What they didn't know at the time is that the body needs time to adjust - the gasses in the body depressurize too quickly and cause great pain and physical damage. Along with Washington Roebling's paralyzing injury, 110 cases of what they then called the "caisson sickness" was diagnosed out of the 600 or so compression workers.

    When it was built it became the only land crossing between Manhattan and Long Island. It was an immediate success with 1800 vehicles and over 150,000 people crossing it on its opening day in 1883. But it was such a marvel that people still didn't quite trust it, and when a rumour spread one day that it was about to collapse there was a stampede that resulted in a dozen people crushed to death. A year later P. T. Barnum led 21 of his elephants across the bridge to show just how safe it was. It has been a New York icon ever since.

    Today at 130 years of age it carries well over a hundred thousand vehicles every day across its half a kilometer span. It's possible to walk or cycle across it along the central walkway, and the views are magnificent.

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    Bridge walk and dinner in China Town :)

    by Gembly Written Mar 1, 2013
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    The just-over-a-mile walk across the Brooklyn Bridge is something you MUST do while in New York City.
    The views of downtown Manhattan are amazing - some of the best in the city, I think! - plus the bridge itself is awesome; the steel cables overhead, the majestic arches and the traffic roaring by underneath you.

    After the walk over the bridge, why not walk a bit further (afterall, Manhattan was built for walkers!!) and pop over to China Town for some food?
    We ended up at Big Wong (had uptown along Centre St for 3 blocks then make a right onto Walker St. Go 3 more blocks and make another right onto Mott St and it's about half way down. You can't miss it - it's got a huge yellow sign out front!)

    Not being hugely adventurous, both of us had a sweet-and-sour dish and egg fried rice. It was seriously delicious! And afterwards, we headed along Mulberry St for 7 blocks until we got to Bleeker St subway station.
    Mulberry Street (the heart of Little Italy) is a delight! Tons of bars and italian restaurants, lots of touristy knick-knack shops and even some drag queens! (definitely worth a walk, if you can move after your HUGE Chinese or Italian meal!!)

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    You have to read

    by solopes Updated Feb 13, 2013

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    New York - USA
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    In the splendour of New York's architecture, this old bridge, may pass unnoticed, unless you are adverted or have the chance to read about it.

    Now a common and discreet bridge, it was, at the time of its construction an astonishing challenge.

    But don't ask me to write what other have done better; just follow the link.

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  • Gili_S's Profile Photo

    Brooklyn Bridge

    by Gili_S Updated Nov 11, 2012
    Walking over the Brooklyn Bridge

    One of the icons of New York is the Brooklyn Bridge. This time I even planned it that our hotel will be in a walking distance from the bridge and one morning after breakfast we took a walk all the way to and over the Brooklyn Bridge to Brooklyn,

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    New York's most popular (and most tragic?)

    by Tijavi Updated Sep 29, 2012
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    Not only is the Brooklyn Bridge NYC's most famous and photographed (it really is architecturally pleasing to the eyes), but perhaps its most storied - mostly tragic, sadly. During its 16-year construction, it claimed 20 lives, mostly from caisson disease. But nothing could be more tragic than the death of John Roebling, the engineer who designed and conceptualized the bridge, not from any disease but from an accident. Weeks before construction, Roebling's foot was crushed between an incoming ferry and the ferry slip. Three weeks later, Roebling died and his son Washington took over. Washington himself suffered from caisson disease and his wife completed the bridge under his direction.

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  • etfromnc's Profile Photo

    Visit the Brooklyn Bridge but don't dare buy it.

    by etfromnc Updated Jun 12, 2012

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    These are not the caissons into which I ventured.

    On May 24, 1883, after 14 years and 27 construction-related deaths, the Brooklyn Bridge opened, connecting the cities of New York and Brooklyn (Yes, in 1883, they were separate, independent cities.)over the East River for the first time in history. Thousands of Brooklyn and Manhattan Island residents witnessed the dedication ceremony, presided over by President Chester A. Arthur and New York Gov. Grover Cleveland. Designed by the late John A. Roebling, the Brooklyn Bridge was the largest suspension bridge ever built at that time, and was dubbed the 8th wonder of the world.
    On May 25, 1983, I was there, only a day late but unfortunately several dollars short, for the centennial celebration of its opening. Although I missed most of the fanfare, I may have had a better visit. I got an individually personalized tour of the bridge, including actually going down into one of the caissons. (I had always assumed that they were solid since they have such a daunting task to perform.) From there I walked to the Brooklyn Borough Branch of the New York Public Library where I saw another display on the construction of the bridge and an art exhibit which had absolutely nothing to do with Robert Mapplethorpe.
    Late that afternoon, I had one of the best seafood dinners that I have ever had, followed by an extremely long walk back up town which would have been long enough even if I had not gotten lost and ended up deep in the Bowery. I had absolutely no trouble sleeping that night.
    Being a day late for the celebration was not by design but I am rather pleased that it worked out that way.

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    Brooklyn Bridge

    by PinkFloydActuary Updated Dec 31, 2011

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    Starting across
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    While walking around on the south end of Manhattan, I passed a sign pointing to the Brooklyn Bridge, and with a little time to kill, I headed over. I started to walk across just to get a look at some of the architecture, and before you know it, you're close to the center of the bridge. There is a lot of pedestrian traffic here, and many cyclists as well. About 15 minutes across, there is a fairly wide area where many people huddle to take pictures as a break point across the East river.

    The bridge itself is one of the oldest suspension bridges in the country. The pedestrian/cycle access is above the vehicle access on the bridge. What was appealing to me was the construction - this is a very neat bridge to look at, deserving of its landmark status.

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    Brooklyn Bridge-Work of Art by John Roebling!

    by machomikemd Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    view from broolyn side
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    In 1855, John Roebling, famous bridge designer at that time, proposed a suspension bridge over the East River Work began on the Brooklyn Bridge in 1869. His son Washington, also an accomplished engineer, took over direction of the construction after his father’s death. In 1883, the Brooklyn Bridge, then known as the "Great East River Bridge," opened to the public. Twenty-seven men overall died during construction. The Brooklyn Bridge, now a National Historic Landmark, is Brooklyn's most beloved tourist attraction as well as the connection between Brooklyn and Manhattan for close to 140,000 vehicles daily but is not the only bridge that coonects brooklyn to manhattan. The Brooklyn Bridge's main span over the East River is 1,595 feet (486 meters) and takes you from Manhattan's civic center into tree-lined Brooklyn Heights.

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  • mariahc1's Profile Photo

    Brooklyn Bridge never loses its magic

    by mariahc1 Written Mar 26, 2011
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    It is one of the most famous bridges in the world. You don't have to know much about it to love it. It is very beautiful. We did a bicycle tour the last time we were there from Times Square to Brooklyn Bridge. It was a lovely way to see it. Of course the view from the bridge is spectacular so those of you who are fond of taking pictures, this is your chance!

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  • jlynyc's Profile Photo

    Stroll from Manhattan to Brooklyn

    by jlynyc Updated Sep 28, 2010

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    Brooklyn Bridge

    If you've got some time and the weather is nice, consider taking a stroll across the Brooklyn Bridge. It is one of the most iconic bridges in the country and offers beautiful views. If you are in downtown Manhattan, the bridge is next to City Hall and the courthouses, just north of the financial district. Once you get to Brooklyn, if you're hungry grab a slice of pizza at Grimaldi's (there may be a line to wait, but it is true, authentic NY pizza!) or take a stroll to Brooklyn Heights (a truly stunning area filled with well kept brownstones) and walk along the promenade for more great views of Manhattan. There are some great shops and restaurants in Brooklyn, so don't overlook this borough on your visit!

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    Walk or ride the bicicle

    by ines2003 Written Sep 21, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    brooklyn brigde

    you can run, walk or ride bicicle in border or the brigde it take depends you between 15 minutos and hours, you see the river, the city teh people crossing the bridge it very nice experience and good exersise.

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    Walk or ride the bicicle

    by ines2003 Written Sep 21, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    brooklyn brigde

    you can run, walk or ride bicicle in border or the brigde it take depends you between 15 minutos and hours, you see the river, the city teh people crossing the bridge it very nice experience and good exersise.

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    The Brooklyn Bridge

    by richiecdisc Written May 24, 2010

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    approaching the Brooklyn Bridge as the sun goes do
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    With only a couple days in NYC, it would have been silly to even thick we could see even a representative sampling of what this amazing place has to offer. So, it made sense to try and see some things we had not seen and it being Christmas time, certainly see the parts of The City that shine most during that special time of year. It was a ramshackle visit and there was no rhyme nor reason on how we picked places or in what order we visited them. Oh, I guess there was one overriding factor and that was price. We didn't have a lot of money and even though my friend had got us a free room in Jersey City just across the Hudson, we decided most of our money would be spent on food and drink. So, we were looking for cheap thrills and anything free now somehow took on a new luster. We weren't going to any Broadway shows but of course, we would have to do some of the touristy things I had managed to escape on my first twenty odd visits to the city that never sleeps.

    We arrived much later than we might have liked despite flying into the area the night prior at some ungodly hour thanks to a huge winter storm wrecking havoc on the East Coast. With getting to bed late and staying in my friend's house in NJ the first night, it was not going to be the dawn photo shoot I had been dreaming of. No, we sauntered into town after checking into our free Jersey City room well after lunchtime. We had somehow managed to not have lunch even though the original plan was to hit a deli for lunch before doing any sight-seeing. No, with this late of an arrival and it being possibly the only nice day of our trip, I forced our little group of two very different couples towards the Brooklyn Bridge, passing off anyone's hunger pains as requisite payment for such a late arrival. Once in sight, it was like a magnet compelling me. The light was perfect and the iconic landmark forged in my brain after watching Woody Allen's Manhattan a few too many times never looked so impressive. Sure, there are bigger bridges but in its day, and that day was way back in 1883, it was the biggest and surely most impressive with its first ever steel wire construction. But that's just nuts and bolts. Outside of San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge, I don't think there is another nearly as atmospheric and if you do it in Black & White, it wins hands down.

    Walking across The Brooklyn Bridge is something I've always wanted to do and never got around to but there is something a bit anti-climatic about actually getting onto this thing. And believe me, it's no easy task when you start out by trying to get pictures of it from the pier and right at its base. This puts you what seems miles from the entrance of the bridge, especially when it's a clear cold winter's day. Still, some things have to be done and this was one time I was not to be thwarted. Once on the bridge, you are stuck with the fact that you can no longer see is beautiful breadth though you are rewarded with not only an up close look at its intricate construction but also unparalleled views of the New York City skyline. This is one gorgeous walk as the sun is going down and that is exactly what we were quite unwittingly doing. I would have likely planned this for early morning and this is one time when the best plan is not your first choice. So, as it turned out our late arrival turned out to be a blessing in disguise. I got my best photos that afternoon, not only of Brooklyn Bridge but of the NYC skyline and with the aid of a strong zoom, The Empire State Building too! That this amazing walk would lead us to one of the best pizzas I've ever eaten was only icing on the cake but believe me, after this long of a walk, it was a well-deserved reward at that!

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  • Visit when it rains, or snows

    by jamaher Written May 7, 2010

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    Brooklyn Bridge During a Snowstorm at Sunset

    Are you sad because you're visiting New York and it's raining, or snowing? Not many people know that it's best to visit the Brooklyn Bridge during the rain! Not only does the bridge clear with tourists during the rain, but it ads a magical atmosphere to the views of the city and the bridge itself.

    Also stop to read the plaques on the bridge about the history of the construction of the bridge. It's an incredible story with the main architect dying a month into construction and his son getting the bends from the construction and spending the last 11 years leading the construction without actually setting foot on the bridge!

    You can read more about the history of the bridge here: http://www.jamesmaherphotography.com/articles/26-brooklyn-bridge

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    Best Free Thing #1 - Walk the Brooklyn Bridge

    by goodfish Updated Apr 29, 2010

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    Tower, Brooklyn Bridge, NYC
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    This was the #1 thing on my to-do list and the highlight of the week. It was also the most frustrating as my camera battery checked out before I could capture those amazing views of the Manhattan skyline - $#%#*&!

    This is one of the oldest suspension bridges in the country and the first to be constructed across the East River. Connecting Manhattan and Brooklyn, this mile-long icon of NYC was engineered by John Roebling and son, Washington - both of whom sustained fatal and near-fatal injuries seeing the dream to reality. The elder Roebling was surveying a location for the Brooklyn tower when his foot was crushed by an incoming ferry; he died of tetanus several weeks later. Washington took the reins as chief engineer only to become almost totally incapacitated from decompression sickness (also known as "the bends") after emerging from one of the deep, dangerous caissons used to build the foundations of the bridge. Unable to oversee the work from the construction site, he carried on, with a telescope, from his bed and his wife, Emily, became the unofficial director of the massive operation. Begun in 1867, it was finally completed in 1883 and designated a National Historic Landmark in 1964.

    Today, the bridge channels many thousands of vehicles, bikers and pedestrians between the two boroughs and, day or night, the magnificent panorama of Lower Manhattan from this nearly 150 year-old engineering marvel is reason enough to lace on your walking shoes. If you become a bit peckish after all that exercise, one of NYC's top pizzarias, Grimaldi's, is located at the foot of the bridge, near the river, on the Brooklyn side. The attached link, "How to Walk the Brooklyn Bridge" (with thanks to Kristin Goode), will tell you how to get there. It's casual, inexpensive and usually very busy.

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