Central Park, New York City

4.5 out of 5 stars 406 Reviews

Central Park, New York, NY 10022 (212) 310-6600

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Central Park
    by Tijavi
  • Benches with memorial plates
    Benches with memorial plates
    by Turska
  • Dog walkers!
    Dog walkers!
    by Turska
  • Chinggis_n_Borte's Profile Photo

    Central Park a place to walk and relax

    by Chinggis_n_Borte Updated Jan 14, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There's more to do in Central Park than just do the routine walk, stroll, tai-ichi and running excercises. Couple of things you can do are Horse Coach or carriage riding, the TukTuk or tricycle ride , whole day bike rentals,lake boat rowing, photography, videoing , wedding, picnics and barb-q, school children tour, moonlighting at night, skating and many more.People from different walks of life come to this park especially on the weekends to relax from work and bring their families.There's also a number of monuments and historical markings you will run to and all of which plays an important role of the history of not only New Yorkers but the American people.

    Central Park Lake Bryant Skate Park Beautiful trees at central park on autumn American Meseum of Natural History Varieties of beautiful flowers is everywhere
    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • National/State Park
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Designerartgirl's Profile Photo

    Central Park

    by Designerartgirl Written Nov 15, 2014

    This park is huge! I mean absolutely enormous! You have this vision as a kid that its big, but when you are actually in it, you really see how big it is. I just wanted to walk from left to right to get to the guggenheim and then realised what i chewed off. Its a beautiful park. A good mix of people, runners, old ladies who meet and chat, lots of wildlife and lots of peace and quiet. Perfect for a place to unwind after a busy city.

    friendly locals... huge lakes lovely.

    Was this review helpful?

  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    View from Rockefeller Center

    by machomikemd Written Jul 28, 2014

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    the pictures of Central Park from the Top of the Rock Observation Deck in Rockefeller Center in midtown, located about 10 blocks away fromc central park.

    Central Park is bordered on the north by West 110th Street, on the west by Central Park West, on the south by West 59th Street, and on the east by Fifth Avenue. Along the park's borders, these streets are usually referred to as Central Park North, Central Park West, and Central Park South, respectively. It contains several natural-appearing lakes, extensive walking tracks, two ice-skating rinks, the Central Park Zoo, a wildlife sanctuary, a summer Shakespeare festival, and grassy areas used for informal or team sports or set aside as quiet areas, as well as playground enclosures for children. The 6-miles (10 km) of drives circling the park are popular with joggers, bicyclists and inline skaters, especially on weekends and in the evenings after 7:00 p.m., when automobile traffic is banned.

    With about twenty-five million visitors annually, Central Park is the most visited city park in the United States, and its appearance in many movies and television shows has made it among the most famous city parks in the world. It is run by the Central Park Conservancy, a private, not-for-profit organization that manages the park under a contract with the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation

    opens 24/7

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • National/State Park
    • Theme Park Trips

    Was this review helpful?

  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Central Park: Overview- Big, Humongous!

    by machomikemd Updated Jul 14, 2014

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I will have separate tips on specific sections of the Huge Central Park as I went to some areas of this famous park.

    Central Park is bordered on the north by West 110th Street, on the west by Central Park West, on the south by West 59th Street, and on the east by Fifth Avenue. Along the park's borders, these streets are usually referred to as Central Park North, Central Park West, and Central Park South, respectively. It contains several natural-appearing lakes, extensive walking tracks, two ice-skating rinks, the Central Park Zoo, a wildlife sanctuary, a summer Shakespeare festival, and grassy areas used for informal or team sports or set aside as quiet areas, as well as playground enclosures for children. The 6-miles (10 km) of drives circling the park are popular with joggers, bicyclists and inline skaters, especially on weekends and in the evenings after 7:00 p.m., when automobile traffic is banned.

    With about twenty-five million visitors annually, Central Park is the most visited city park in the United States, and its appearance in many movies and television shows has made it among the most famous city parks in the world. It is run by the Central Park Conservancy, a private, not-for-profit organization that manages the park under a contract with the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation

    opens 24/7

    Huge Central Park! ALong Park Avenue More!
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • nyperose's Profile Photo

    On a bike ride around Central Park

    by nyperose Written Jul 5, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I rented a bike for 3 hours and went for a ride around Central Park. One is not allowed to ride the bike on the paths inside the park, but around the park there are great bike lanes, and you can easily get off your bike and walk beside it inside the park.

    Central Park is huge, so in order to be able to see it all, renting a bike is the best solution.
    There are plenty of bike rentals on the 59th avenue. I paid 25 $ for 3 hours.

    The park is lovely and I had a great time. I abolutely recommend it.

    Biking around Central Park Central Park Central Park Central Park Central Park
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Cycling

    Was this review helpful?

  • etfromnc's Profile Photo

    Parks are free, aren't they?

    by etfromnc Updated May 19, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you have read much of my New York page, you may have noticed that I always feel as if I am coming up short of funds when I visit New York, but parks are free aren't they? And New York's Central Park is one of the most amazing in the world, ranking second only to Hyde Park in London in my estimation, in spite of many of the "Law & Order" stories which are set in Central Park, all of which involve murder.
    Most parks are not Central Park, however, which is Manhattan’s famed claim to thinking ahead (even if it was designed in the 1860s to boost real-estate values uptown). It’s filled with free events, statues, people-watching, and sites like Strawberry Fields, an ‘Imagine’ mosaic near the Dakota apartment-hotel, where John Lennon was killed in 1980. Another site is ‘the Pond,’ at the southeastern corner, where Holden Caulfield kept returning in ‘The Catcher in the Rye,’ wondering where those ducks go when it’s cold.
    This 843-acre oasis in Upper Manhattan is always alive, with ice-skating in winter, open-air concerts in the summer, and carriage rides year-round. There’s a small zoo for the little ones, idyllic rowing opportunities on the lake, and sunbathing in picturesque Sheep Meadow.

    One often thinks of parks as places of peace and quiet, however, and Central Park even offers that. If you want to get away from it all for a bit of quiet revery, try the park's woodland heart at the 38-acre Ramble, between 73rd and 78th Streets. It’s fun to, uh, ramble around the Ramble, as it’s set up purposely like a "wild garden" with little walkways that are easy to get lost in. Once you do, don’t panic: getting lost there only means you found what you were looking for.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • Turska's Profile Photo

    A must thing to do

    by Turska Written May 18, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I think this is things you "must" do In NY, and so did we, even if we don´t usually care about the parks so much. We live so close to nature, there is trees and lakes within 5 min walk from home, so the parks don´t feel so special for us.
    But of course this is strange between all the huge buildings. And it´s nice to those people living in Manhattan, that there is some nature for them. The place wasn´t so big as we thought. Seeing it from photos taken from up from the buildings or from the air, it looks much bigger.

    My husband has loved Alice in wonderland story when he was a kid. Espesially that mad hat maker (is it the real name, I´m not expert on this!), and wanted to see the statues about the story.
    We aren´t Beatles fans, or John Lnnon fans, but we do respect him, as we are music lovers anyway, and we wanted to see this "Imagine" thing on the ground also.
    I did also love thouse beches with memory plates on them. Didn´t know about them before.
    And as I earlier mentioned at another tip, we were fans of tv show "Mad about you", and there was those people walking peoples dogs for money. I had allready forgotten that, but we saw those in Central park! It was fun for us, never seen that before. We couldn´t let our dogs to join those people, those dogs must have used to this since they were puppies :)

    Alice in wonderland Lake was still frozen at march Dog walkers! John Lennon memorial Benches with memorial plates
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Central Park

    by antistar Updated Feb 9, 2014

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Central Park is immense. Not just in fame, or in size but in the sheer strength of will it took to carve the park out of the rocky, swampy soil that it was built on. Manhattan lies on a delta of long lost rivers. The natural course of water is to flow through and under the city. And it continues to do so, forcing the New York subway to pump out millions of gallons of water. This made the land of Central Park a swampy, muddy, rocky mess. It was not a landscape that lent itself to landscape gardening.

    But New Yorkers needed a breathing space - a park to escape to from the every tightening streets of downtown. The state, working to a plan of the city commissioned in 1811, put Frederick Law Olmsted to work on the design. He became known as the father of American landscape architecture. The work he did here building America's first great park, one of the greatest parks in the world, on some of the most troublesome soil, led the way for an explosion of parks across the country.

    Central Park has gone through some changes, just like the city itself, sometimes a respite from noise and breathless activity, sometimes dark and dangerous, but always in the hearts of New Yorkers. It has been a backdrop for many a movie and TV show, and the sights of the park will be instantly recognisable to everyone: the Bow Bridge, the Lake, Bethesda Fountain, Belvedere Castle. The sight from within of the towering turn of the century apartments that surround the park, some of the most expensive real estate in the world, is probably my favourite.

    Conservatory, Central Park, New York Cherry Blossom, Central Park, New York Central Park, New York Bethesda Fountain, Central Park, New York Central Park, New York

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    Felt like a breath of fresh air!

    by Jefie Updated Nov 13, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    With its 843 acres, Central Park covers about 6% of Manhattan. I have no idea why, but I always sort of imagined Central Park to be flat and rather dull. You can therefore imagine my surprise when I discovered this beautiful hilly urban park, graced with statues, lagoons, and lovely walking trails, all designed back in 1857 by landscaper Frederick Law Olmsted and architect Calvert Vaux. Olmsted was a pioneer in the field of landscape architecture and largely drew his inspiration from the English gardens and landscaped cemeteries he had visited. It's no secret that he was very disappointed with how Central Park turned out since the authorities in charge modified his original design to make the park more accessible and practical, and also to lower construction costs. However, to most locals and visitors, Central Park today is an enchanting natural place where people can go to forget all about the busy New York City streets.

    Going on a horse-carriage ride in Central Park is a classic, but at $50 for a 25-min ride, not everyone can afford it. Another really fun thing to do at Central Park is to go on a self-guided walking tour. To do so, you can print a map and download the free audiotour available at http://www.centralpark.com/pages/walking-tours.html. The audiotour covers the southern half of the park, which is the most popular part of Central Park thanks to well-known features such as Strawberry Fields, the Alice in Wonderland monument, and Belvedere Castle. It took us about 2 hours to complete the walking tour, which allowed us to see many of the park's highlights, but there is still so much we haven't seen that Central Park will once again be at the top of our list for our next trip to New York City!

    A view of the pond and the surrounding buildings A statue of poet Robert Burns on the literary walk John Lennon memorial, in Strawberry Fields Some tourist traps are more fun than others! Alice in Wonderland monument in Central Park
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • yooperprof's Profile Photo

    Central Park on a Sunny Spring Day

    by yooperprof Updated Aug 10, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Basking in the sun. . . Not everyone has a kind word about Central Park, but New Yorkers certainly do appreciate the swath of green in the midst of their concrete jungle. On a pleasant day, they love to walk around its lakes, maybe renting a boat, or exploring the Belvedere, which is a Victorian folly, a castellated structure that houses instruments for the National Weather Service as well as exhibit rooms for temporary art and history displays.

    Looking toward the Plaza Hotel a boating party the Belvedere Two friends, basking in the sun at the Belvedere
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • Donna_in_India's Profile Photo

    Central Park's Swedish Cottage Marionette Theater

    by Donna_in_India Written Aug 4, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The delightful Swedish Cottage is set among the trees and flowers in Central Park. Today it is home to one of the last marionette companies left in the country. The cottage was originally built in Sweden as a model pre-fab schoolhouse and after being shown as Sweden's entry in the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia, it was dismantled and brought to Central Park. It wasn't until 1947 that puppeteers brought their puppets to life in the cottage.

    The theater has several wooden benches and "tall" people (parents) must sit along the sides or in against the back wall. I'd suggest getting there about 30 minutes before the performance starts if you want to sit in a row with your child (to get a side seat) - seating is open.

    The cottage is so charming and as you enter you feel as if you are in a fairy tale! We saw Pippi (a version of Pippi Longstocking). The sets were colorful and well-done, the story was fun (although it was a little different than the book/movie), and the marionettes were so fun. Running about an hour long, the shows are a great (and fun) introduction to the theater for your children.

    You MUST pre-purchase tickets or call to make reservations.

    $7.00 between 18 months and 12 years, $10.00 age 13+

    No food/drinks allowed in the theater.

    Photography is allowed. Be courteous if using a flash. :-)

    Swedish Cottage Inside the Swedish Cottage Pippi - Swedish Cottage Pippi - Swedish Cottage
    Related to:
    • Theater Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    CENTRAL PARK

    by LoriPori Written May 12, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A public park at the center of Manhattan, CENTRAL PARK sits on 843 acres of city-owned land and is the most visited urban park in the U.S. with approximately 35 million visitors annually.
    It is 2.5 miles long - between 59th Street and 110th Street - and is 0.5 miles wide - between Fifth Avenue and Central Park West.
    While the land in much of the park appear natural, it is almost entirely landscaped. Its several natural-looking lakes and ponds have been created artificially. The Park also contains walking tracks, Central Park Zoo, a wildlife sanctuary, several children's playgrounds, an outdoor amphitheater and the Boathouse Cafe'.
    A total of 29 sculptures have been erected over the years. One of the most popular is "Alice in Wonderland. Our group took lots of pictures here.

    Alice In Wonderland View of Central Park from

    Was this review helpful?

  • von.otter's Profile Photo

    Daniel Webster Monument

    by von.otter Written Mar 19, 2013

    “Liberty and Union, Now and Forever, One and Inseparable.”
    —Daniel Webster (1782-1852)

    Gordon W. Burnham commissioned Thomas Ball to sculpt a larger-than-life-size version of a statuette he had created in the mid-19th century for Central Park.

    Located on the West Drive of the Park, facing east, the bronze standing figure rests on a tall granite plinth where two carriage drives meet, near the foot of present-day Strawberry Fields. Ball had originally wanted the figure of the Massachusetts senator to stand on the Mall; but it proved to be too big. The miniature statuette by Ball was one of the first mass-produced pieces in the United States; it had been patented and repeatedly reproduced.

    The towering bronze, presented by Burnham to Central Park in 1876 was cast in Munich, Germany.

    Daniel Webster Monument, NYC Central Park, 2012 Daniel Webster Monument, NYC Central Park, 2012 Daniel Webster Monument, NYC Central Park, 2012 Daniel Webster Monument, NYC Central Park, 2012 Daniel Webster Monument, NYC Central Park, 2012
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • von.otter's Profile Photo

    The USS Maine Monument

    by von.otter Updated Mar 15, 2013

    “A monument standing at the mouth of the Narrows, looking out over the ocean, would form a memorial worthy of the brave fellows who died while on duty for their country.”
    —William Randolph Hearst (1863-1951) Hearst believed that the mouth of New York Harbor was most suitable location of the Maine Monument

    Standing at Central Park’s southwest entrance, known as the Merchants’ Gate, the Maine Monument honors the 260 American sailors who died when the battleship USS Maine exploded in Havana Harbor on February 15th, 1898. This incident led to a declaration of war by the United States on Spain, which still held Cuba as a colony. It is widely believed that the United States blew up the USS Maine as a deliberate act to give cause to go to war. When the Spanish-American War ended in December of 1898, Spain gave control of Puerto Rico and Guam, and surrendered the Philippines to the United States. Cuba was granted its independence.

    William Randolph Hearst, publisher of the New York Morning Journal, called for a public subscription to erect a monument honoring the sailors within four days of the USS Maine’s sinking. The newspaper collected large gifts of cash, as well as schoolchildren’s pennies totaling thousands of dollars over a period of a few years.

    As the architect for the project, H. Van Buren Magonigle designed the monument and Attilio Piccirilli sculpted the figures and the massive central pylon of the monument. These men worked together on the Firemen’s Memorial in Riverside Park at West 100th Street. The gilded bronze figure of Columbia Triumphant (see photo #4), atop the monument, is drawn in a seashell-shaped chariot by three sea horses. This grouping was cast from the recovered bronze guns of the Maine.

    The allegorical grouping (see photo #2) entitled “The Antebellum State of Mind: Courage Awaiting the Flight of Peace and Fortitude Supporting the Feeble” is configured as a ship. A youth at the ship’s prow holds his hands in the sign of Victory. The Atlantic and the Pacific (see photo #3) are represented by reclining figures at the side fountains. The names of those who lost their life on the Maine are chiseled on side of the pylon above the oceans.

    The Merchants’ Gate entrance to Central Park was named by the Commissioners of Central Park in 1862. The aim was to honor commerce and business professions for their contribution to New York City.

    USS Maine Monument, NYC, Sept. 2012 USS Maine Monument, NYC, Sept. 2012 USS Maine Monument, NYC, Sept. 2012 USS Maine Monument, NYC, Sept. 2012 USS Maine Monument, NYC, Sept. 2012
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • von.otter's Profile Photo

    Central Park’s Strawberry Fields

    by von.otter Written Jan 30, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    “Imagine all the people living life in peace. You may say I'm a dreamer, but I'm not the only one. I hope someday you'll join us, and the world will be as one.”
    —John Lennon (1940-1980)

    Strawberry Fields, a memorial to John Lennon, a member of the rock and roll band The Beatles, is a peaceful area within New York’s Central Park. Located across the street from Lennon’s home at The Dakota, a 19th-century apartment house, the memorial was named for one of the Beatles’ songs, “Strawberry Fields Forever.” Recorded in 1966, the song’s title references an orphanage in Liverpool, England where Lennon played with the children.

    On 26.March.1981, the New York City council approved legislation, introduced by then-council member and future Parks Commissioner Henry J. Stern on 18.December.1980, which designated this area as Strawberry Fields. The ground-breaking ceremony was held on 21.March.1984. Lennon’s widow, Yoko Ono donated $500,000 to renovate and redesign this area of Central Park, as well as an equivalent sum for an endowment that would provide ongoing maintenance for Strawberry Fields. Yoko Ono worked closely with landscape architect Bruce Kelly and the Central Park Conservancy to create this tranquil spot. Strawberry Fields was officially dedicated on 9.October.1985, the 45th anniversary of John Lennon’s birth.

    With a rich tradition of mosaic tile work, the Italian city of Naples donated the circular mosaic “Imagine”, paying homage to one of Lennon’s most popular solo hits. Based on ancient Greco-Roman designs, this simple art work has become a symbol of peace, Lennon’s much-sought after goal.

    Strawberry Fields, Central Park, NYC, January 2013 Strawberry Fields, Central Park, NYC, January 2013 Strawberry Fields, Central Park, NYC, January 2013 Strawberry Fields, Central Park, NYC, January 2013 Strawberry Fields, Central Park, NYC, January 2013
    Related to:
    • Music
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: New York City

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

41 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Central Park
Show Prices
4.0 out of 5 stars
8 Reviews
0.4 miles away
Show Prices

View all New York City hotels