Harlem, New York City

4.5 out of 5 stars 4.5 Stars - 24 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Getting ready for the 8:00 am service to begin
    Getting ready for the 8:00 am service to...
    by Jefie
  • First Corinthian Baptist Church in Harlem
    First Corinthian Baptist Church in...
    by Jefie
  • Harlem
    by apbeaches
  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    First Corinthian Baptist Church

    by Jefie Written Nov 14, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    First Corinthian Baptist Church in Harlem
    1 more image

    I had always been curious to attend a gospel celebration in Harlem and when my friend Daniel told me about his experience at the First Corinthian Baptist Church, I decided to go there and attend the 8:00 am service for a more authentic experience than what other churches (like the famous Abyssinian Baptist Church) might offer. The building the church is located in used to be a theater and dates back to 1913. Although visitors are sometimes asked to sit upstairs in the balcony section, I was lucky enough to sit with the rest of the congregation. They acknowledged my presence as a visitor rather than a tourist and made me feel very welcome. The celebration itself was similar to other Baptist services I'd attended before - the choir was absolutely brilliant and so was the pastor. So if you're open-minded and looking for a unique experience in NYC, don't miss the opportunity to spend a Sunday morning at the First Corinthian Baptist Church.

    It's a good idea to show up at least 15-20 minutes before service starts. There is no dress code (even the pastor was wearing jeans), but I'd still recommend wearing something appropriate (no shorts or tank tops).

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    Discover this century's Harlem

    by Jefie Updated Nov 14, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Apollo Theatreon W 125th Street
    1 more image

    There is something almost mythical about Harlem, which is why we were so excited when Chafin, our Big Apple Greeter, took us on a walking tour of the neighbourhood he grew up in. My first impression was that Harlem was very different from what I had pictured; I guess I was expecting something a tad grittier than the rows of beautiful brownstone buildings we saw! Chafin explained that most of the area was in the process of being gentrified, and he did show us some examples of what the area used to look like not that long ago, with boarded up buildings and graffiti. From the 1950s until the late 1980s, Harlem was considered one of New York City’s most notorious hotbeds for criminal activity. However, the crime rate has dropped dramatically over the past two decades and today, Harlem is getting back to its humble, much safer roots. The population is still predominantly African-American, which gives it a very distinctive flavour. Some of the most interesting sites Chafin took us to included the old Audubon Ballroom (the site of Malcolm X’s assassination on February 21, 1965), the legendary Apollo Theatre, and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture (http://www.nypl.org/locations/schomburg), which is part of the New York Public Library system; you can visit the Schomburg’s exhibitions for free, and when we were there we got to see a really neat collection of candid and intimate pictures summing up Barrack Obama’s first year as President of the United States. Don't forget to stop by Sylvia's (see my restaurant tip) when you get hungry!

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • iam1wthee's Profile Photo

    Harlem tours by MMPCIA

    by iam1wthee Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In June they hold tours exploring the architecture, history, culture, and landscape of the Mount Morris section of Harlem. You get to go into the homes of about 20 brownstones on your own and you can ask the homeowner questions anything from where did you buy that chair? to how long has your family owned the home? Then you take the historical architecture, jazz, and park tour. All 4 tours together was for $20. **The price may increase. Get there early since part of the tour is self guided you will not be able to see everything by 6pm if you come late. The tour meets at the entrance of Mount Morris Park otherwise known as Marcus Garvey Park.

    You can call them and ask them for a special group tour and they will not only show you the standard but whatever else is your specialty.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Music
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • WALK ACROSS GEORGE WASHINGTON BRIDGE

    by rmwhitt Updated Jun 9, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A must-do for locals and tourists alike--walk across the George Washington Bridge from Manhattan to New Jersey. Finding the entrance to the bridge can be a bit challenging, but Mapquest the location (178th Ave. and Cabrini Blvd., a block off of Broadway ALL the way uptown) to get there. There's plenty of neighborhood parking if you drive there (drive around to find a free spot--I found one right away), or take the subway from midtown (A Train to 175th, or check www.hopstop.com for alternative bus and subway info.). Enter the bridge on the SOUTH side. IGNORE the sign that says that the south entrance of the bridge is closed and to use the north side. The NORTH SIDE has been closed for years (I walked over to the north side and it was chained shut), and the south entrance IS open, really!! --just follow the curved rampway up (pedestrian and bike path) and onto the bridge.

    The bridge walk, from end to end, takes about 20-25 minutes each way. You'll encounter a few other walkers and a number of bicyclists, but don't worry--the walkway is wide enough to accomodate all. And the views of Manhattan from the bridge are magnificent--made me gasp in appreciation, and I drive across the bridge regularly--but the view from the walkway is so much nicer than the glimpse you get when driving across the bridge. As you reach the middle of the bridge, pause to gaze at the boats and barges below on the Hudson River, with the marvelous view of New York City as your backdrop. To the right, across the bridge span, are the Palisades, the hills and cliffs that rise up and border the Hudson River.

    When you reach the end of the bridge, you will be in Fort Lee, New Jersey. Hang a left off of the bridge, walk past Ft. Lee/Palisades Park (save this park visit for another day!), then turn right and follow the signs to Main Street-it's a quick 5 minute stroll. Walk around this cute little town, grab a cold beverage (and a restroom stop) at Borders, then return to the entrance point and complete your walk back to Manhattan.

    It's a wonderful way to spend a couple of hours!

    Related to:
    • Cycling
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • apbeaches's Profile Photo

    Hall of Fame for Great Americans

    by apbeaches Written Jan 16, 2010
    1 more image

    This is the original U.S. Hall of Fame;is a New York landmark institution founded in 1900
    The Hall of Fame 630-foot open-air Colonnade honoring famous prominent Americans who have had a significant impact on this nation's history.

    Built in a sweeping semicircular Neo-Classical arc with wings at either end, it provides a panorama across the Harlem River to the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park and beyond to the Palisades. It is a unique and patriotic reminder that this country's phenomenal growth has been due to the vitality, ingenuity, and intellect of these individuals.

    The complex of three buildings adjoining the Colonnade-Gould Memorial Library, the Hall of Languages, and Cornelius Baker Hall of Philosophy-were also designed by Stanford White and bear a close conceptual relationship to the Colonnade, with the library as the central focus. These three buildings were among the first constructed on the University Heights campus-Language Hall (1894), Gould Memorial Library (1899), and Philosophy Hall (1912).

    The principal feature of the Hall of Fame are bronze portrait busts and commemorative plaques from 1900. The categories represented in the Hall of Fame are authors, educators, architects, inventors, military leaders, judges, theologians, philanthropists, humanitarians, scientists, statesmen, artists, musicians, actors, and explorers.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • apbeaches's Profile Photo

    The City College of New York

    by apbeaches Written Aug 22, 2009

    Founded in 1907, the City College of New York’s campus on Hamilton Heights in Harlem. CCNY came uptown after it had outgrown its original facility, the Free Academy building at 23rd Street and Lexington Ave. The new campus, designed by George B. Post, gave the College a “plant second to none,” and it is considered one of the finest examples of neo-Gothic architecture at any institution in the United States.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Karen10019's Profile Photo

    Dance Parade

    by Karen10019 Written Apr 6, 2009

    Dance Parade Saturday, May16th
    WWW.DANCEPARADE.ORG

    Parade Registration
    http://www.danceparade.org/EE/index.php/join/join_parade/

    Dance Parade Inc is an 501(c)3 charity who’s mission is:

    to promote dance as an expressive and unifying art form by
    showcasing all forms of dance, educating the general public
    about the opportunities to experience dance, and celebrating
    diversity of dance in New York City by sponsoring a yearly
    city-wide dance parade and dance festival.

    Why we do what we do:

    To honor Dance’s historical roots:
    New York has never celebrated the forms of dance that it has birthed until now: Voguing, Jazz, the Jitterbug, Punk, Gothic--even Salsa was birthed in the Cuban Communities in this great city. And it is now time for Dance. New York has enjoyed the last three years of a September Art Parade and since May 2007, we are finally honoring Dance in a similar fashion.

    To unite in respecting Dance’s diversity:
    Dance is vital in healthy societies, helping people to communicate and affirm individual and collective identity. Dance Parade is a multi-cultural, multi-generational expression of the joy and value of these various forms of expression. It will foster cross-pollination of dance forms as it introduces audiences to novel styles and beats: teenagers to tango, clubbers to square-dancing, and seniors to hip-hop.

    To support grass-roots organizations:
    As an umbrella organization, Dance Parade empowers and supports dance communities that do not have access to public funding yet have a communicative art form they wish to practice and promote. We help them build websites, get access to materials, fundraise, and reach broader audiences.

    To legitimize Dance as a communicative, social form of expression:
    In the 19th century, ballroom dancing was deemed devil’s work. In the 1920’s, New York City enacted the Cabaret Law to stem interracial dancing from Harlem Jazz Clubs. The 1930’s had Nazi Germany quashing Swing Dancing because it was considered anarchistic. And in 2006, a New York State Supreme Court ruled that, unlike music, theater and painting, dance is not a constitutionally protected form of expression. In contrast, Dance Parade will highlight the diversity found in its many forms and showcase dance’s immense cultural and communicative importance.

    To invoke joy and brotherhood:
    New York’s annual dance parade will reinstate New York City as the dance performance and nightlife capital of the world. We quote Dr. Motte, the founder of Berlin’s Love parade: “Dance is spreading rapidly and is unstoppable around the world. It is about LOVE and it is about FREEDOM. This represents a much wider personal, social and spiritual transformation-revolution which will utterly change our world over the coming decades. THIS IS OUR FUTURE. OPEN YOUR HEART! FREE YOUR MIND! FACE YOUR FEARS! LIVE YOUR SOUL! DANCE!”

    Related to:
    • Festivals

    Was this review helpful?

  • davequ's Profile Photo

    Harlem

    by davequ Updated Oct 24, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    So much history and still much character (despite the gentrification)
    in one of my favorite parts of town.

    Lots of street art, music & good food. Even if you are staying in the city for a few days, Harlem is definitely worth at the least a day / night visit.

    Yummy / unique street eats (stop in @ Wimps for some sweet potatoe pie!) everywhere I went.

    Great street scenes during the day, I thought the people were very friendly & helpful,
    and the club / music action at night is outstanding.
    Harlem at the very least is an excellent place to walk around & hang out.



    In the afternoon I got hungry and stopped in at Manna's on 125th St / Martin Luther King for some soul food buffet.

    After filling my plate with my faves I saw a man sitting at a table with a guitar case in the corner.
    He said it was ok to sit down and after mentioning I used to play and finding he still plays around town we struck up a long conversation.

    Turns out he's a monster blues guitar player.
    Michael Powers plays all over NYC, especially at Terra Blues on Bleecker St in Greenwich Village.

    We had some things in common musically as far as tastes, people we both had played with in the past, etc. so we had a good fun conversation and I'm glad I met Michael.

    One night later that week I went down to Terra Blues with my old drummer to see Michael, and sure as *** he burned the house down.

    A lucky lucky day in Harlem.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Food and Dining
    • Music

    Was this review helpful?

  • apbeaches's Profile Photo

    Climbing Highbridge

    by apbeaches Updated Oct 15, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    3 more images

    This was once a water pressure equalizing stucture & part of the Croton Aqueduct sytem. We climbed this Neo-Gothic tower & had panoramic views of the City. The Highbridge Tower was built in 1872. Water from the Aqueduct crossed the High Bridge, it was pumped up to a seven-acre, 10.8-million-gallon reservoir next to the tower. The Highbridge Pool was built inside the old reservoir in 1936. The water tank in the tower served the small number of customers at an even higher elevation. Extending up the 185-foot height of the octagonal granite tower are two iron pipes that reached to a 47,000-gallon tank, now gone. The water was pumped up one pipe to the tank, and flowed down the other.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • iam1wthee's Profile Photo

    Harlem shows- live singing and jazz

    by iam1wthee Updated Apr 20, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you come to Harlem you have to go to either the Apollo, Cotton Club, or one of the Jazz clubs. Don't just tour the place come and enjoy the entertainment. Showtime at the Apollo is filmed of course in the Apollo and has got to be the best FREE show in town. There are crazy things that people do that do not get shown on TV. Grants Tomb over by Riverside Drive has many summer jazz concerts and activities during Harlem Week.

    This neighborhood has the best soul food in Manhattan at relatively reasonable prices at good portions.

    The architecture of the buildings is pretty varied as well, all with its own history. Believe it or not the 1st President, George Washington once slept over in the Morris Jumel Mansion which is the border between Harlem and Washington heights. Across from it there is a block called the terrace where the buildings are kept the same as when he was there. Houses there go for about 500K US and they are real tiny. Unfortunately because it is protected you are limited in renovation.

    Come before 10pm because they shut most things down after that. The only time they are open past that time is when there is Harlem Week.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • King_Golo's Profile Photo

    Harlem - still quite unknown to most visitors

    by King_Golo Written Jan 6, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Harlem probably still suffers from its history. Notorious for being a dangerous place with a hell lot of crime, the quarter was generally not visited by tourists for years and years. I remember my mum's stories from going there in 1971... she and her two friends were the only white people in the area and were looked at quite strangely. Back then, Harlem was a poor part of New York - nowadays it is a vibrant and exciting place! All around Columbia University with its British-looking campus buildings, Harlem buzzes all day long. It's a multiethnic neighbourhood like so many in NYC, mostly inhabited by Asians and Latinos, and therefore a good place to feel the melting pot in action.
    I went to Harlem to visit a friend's friend, and she gave me a walking tour through some of the streets. While I enjoyed being told many interesting anecdotes about the quarter (Brid has lived there since 1993!), my most vivid memory is the view from Harlem's waterfront towards New Jersey. The sun was just setting, it was a warm and pleasant evening and we were standing on the shore of Hudson River looking over the vast masses of water... Unfortunately, I had left my camera at Brid's home, so no pictures of this walk. Thus, it's best to try it yourselves!

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • draguza's Profile Photo

    Harlem

    by draguza Written Feb 12, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Harlem in the 60ies

    Harlem is a neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City, long known as a major African American cultural and business center, although the name is sometimes reckoned as comprising the whole of upper Manhattan.

    Harlem has various subsections with their own landmarks and identities. Harlem is comprised of three main sections, Central, East, and West, each with their own sections

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Music
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • aah_stone's Profile Photo

    Shuffling around Harlem

    by aah_stone Written Jul 4, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Just have a wander around. You will meet and see some very interesting people here. It seems a million miles away from Midtown. The are many very interesting shops, cafes and restaurants here.

    You should be able to find gospel music here without any trouble at all.

    I found the whole atmosphere here very exciting and reccomend that you explore Harlem. You will see many pieces of street art here some very good (some just plain vandalism). I thoughly enjoyed my afternoon here.

    I do reccomend you approach on the subway from the south and not from the north from my experience. I came south from The Bronx and was 'checked out' by what I perceived to be a gang on the plaform of 161st Station. Nothing untoward happened but a little unsettling for a guy on his own on a quiet platform

    (Sorry no pics)

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • School Holidays
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • ammi187's Profile Photo

    ALOT

    by ammi187 Written Jun 26, 2005

    alot to see in NYC, the WTC is gone it was a must see place, otherwise central park, empire state, 5th avenue, broadway, ground zero, brookly bridge, the 5 boroughs, harlem, NYC is just alot to see, also a must is travelling to montague bay long island.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Dimi1's Profile Photo

    Farewell Michelle, my belle...

    by Dimi1 Updated Mar 29, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Another little queen of Harlem... What may she do today? ...All the colourful people of New York City, where do they all belong to... They say we're all Americans, and this town is our town... We're all gone to look for America...

    But New York City is quite different from the rest of the US.

    NYC is unique !

    Every borough of NYC is unique and a world of it's own !

    NYC is just another America !

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: New York City

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

99 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Harlem
3.0 out of 5 stars
267 Opinions
0.4 miles away
Show Prices
3.0 out of 5 stars
566 Opinions
0.6 miles away
Show Prices
3.0 out of 5 stars
635 Opinions
0.7 miles away
Show Prices

View all New York City hotels