Little Italy, New York City

4 out of 5 stars 45 Reviews

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  • Little Italy
    by fdrich29
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    Littly Italy.
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    by bennforlife
  • lubyatoo's Profile Photo

    Know Italian

    by lubyatoo Written Feb 15, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Visit shops and restaurants.

    Always try to impress you host in the restaurant that you speak a little Italian, i.e. learn right pronounciation of words like manicotti, pizza, or even when we are at it venti and sphagetti. : )

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    San Gennaro Festival

    by April1985 Updated Sep 22, 2006

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    St. San Gennaro
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    Going to Little Italy is one thing. Going to Little Italy during San Gennaro, is a totally different experience. The smell of food in the air is amazing! The people are so friendly, and once you sink your teeth into anything you buy, is like your in heaven!

    *update: I am actually going back to Little Italy for the 79th Annual Feast of San Gennaro (Sept. 2006). Since I have been in NY, this is one of the only festivals I tend to keep going to year after year. I am very excited to go take pictures, and buy delicious food, and share this experience with my boyfriend and one of my best friends. Its going to be a treat.

    Now for some background information on the Feast of San Gennaro:

    San Gennaro is one of New Yorks largest feat's/festivals. This year, in 2006, San Gennaro will be celebrating it's 79th annual feast. It will be 11 days long from september 14th - september 24th. The San Gennaro festival celebrates the Patron Saint of Naples. The very first San Gennaro festival took place on September 19, 1926. On this day in history,newly arrived immigrants from Naples settled along Mulberry Street in Little Italy (NYC) and they had decided to continue the tradition they followed in Italy. That tradition was to celebrate the day when Saint Gennaro was martyred for the faith in 305 A.D. Every year on September 19th, a Religious Procession happens that includes the Statue of San Gennaro. This statue goes down Mulberry and Mott St., between Canal and Houston St.. The procession begins immediately following a Celebratory Mass held at the Most Precious Blood Church on Mulberry Street, the National Shrine of San Gennaro. This is really interesting, especially for me, as I am not very religious, the saint is covered in money. I believe it is for good luck, but I am not sure. I have taken a picture in front of it a few years ago, and Ill do it again when I go there tomorow.

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  • isolina_it's Profile Photo

    Little Italy

    by isolina_it Written Apr 24, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Once the home of much of New York City's Italian population, Little Italy has become more of a tourist destination than a residential neighborhood. Previously, Little Italy spread from Canal Street north to Houston, but now its borders are limited to about four city blocks. Still, Little Italy is worth visiting for delicious imported Italian groceries and . Being Italian I needed to see how it looked like, I wasn`t very impressed but I can see it`s a bit like diving into a typical street of an old looking italian touristic village, with its cafes and restaurants

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  • PetraG's Profile Photo

    Little Italy

    by PetraG Updated Mar 7, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    San Gennaro Festival, Little Italy
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    Little Italy is centered around Mulberry Street from Spring Street to Canal Street in Manhattan. The narrow streets are packed with New York's best Italian restaurants and cafes.
    Major Sights in geographical order

    Old St. Patrick's Cathedral (Prince Street & Mulberry Street)
    Umberto's Clam House (Hester Street & Mulberry Street)
    Bowery Savings Bank (130 Bowery at Grand)
    Former Police Headquarters Building (Centre Street from Grand to Broome)
    Fourteenth Ward Industrial School of the Children's Aid Society (256-58 Mott Street between Prince and Houston)
    Pioneer Hotel (146-48 Bowery at Broome)
    Puck Building (295-309 Lafayette Street)

    We came there when teh famous San Gennaro Festival was held. There were street-markets and carnival stands with a lot of fun and delicious italian food!

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  • draguza's Profile Photo

    Little Italy

    by draguza Written Feb 12, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Little Italy

    Little Italy is centered around Mulberry Street from Spring Street to Canal Street in Manhattan. The narrow streets are packed with New York's best Italian restaurants and cafes.

    The Feast of San Gennaro is an annual celebration of Saint Gennaro, the Patron Saint of Naples, who was martyred in 305 A.D. New York City's first feast took place on September 19, 1926, when newly arrived immigrants from Naples settled along Mulberry Street, and decided to continue the celebration that began in Italy years before

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  • sugarpuff's Profile Photo

    Pizza , pasta, prosciutto...

    by sugarpuff Updated Feb 10, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ciao!!!!
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    "Bambino, are you lost? I take a you back a to my casa and give a you a good a food a ok?"

    OK, well it didnt necessarily work out like that.....but nobody needs to know the truth do they? It was actually a girl, around my age I think who saw Charles and I discussing where Little Italy could actually be...ha ha! It was plainly obvious where it was, but we didnt know in what direction next to walk to stay in it. So this girl asked us if she could help and she directed us to a great restaurant and then said that if we were wanting dessert afterwards, to head over to another place which do delicious cakes and ice cream! It was so nice of her to tell us this and something which i had already found to be a trait in the New Yorkers! You see in London, there is no way that people have the time of day to help tourists and you really feel lost sometimes, but here, in the Big Apple, it felt different. We had already been told what stop to get off on the subway by a drunk/tramp earlier on in the day, and we would yet have the pleasure of meeting someone who saved one of my shoes...(tell you in another section about that!).

    So off we walked in the right direction looking at menus as we went trying to decide on what we wanted to eat and how much we wanted to pay. We arrived at the recommeded place but they specialised in pastas and Charles really wanted a pizza, but the waiter told us very enthusiastically where else we could go for a good pizza. My goodness, do these people have no loyalty to their restaurants we wondered? Well it soon became obvious when we appraoched the second place that it was actually co-run by the first one, so it all started to make sense now! They had a great deal going of $9.95 for a soup and main meal, so we 'indulged' ourselves....and it was actually really nice. But please remember that tax will then get added on top. 'Il Piccolo Buffalo' was its name.

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  • EdinburghRoc's Profile Photo

    Enjoy the Festival with Italians

    by EdinburghRoc Updated Oct 27, 2005

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Little Italy

    I enjoyed walking through Little Italy and feeling the buzz with the Italian Americans.
    But then perhaps it was the massage I had before hand in the street from a china man, which made me feel good.
    New York its international !

    Related to:
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    • Women's Travel
    • Budget Travel

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  • Blatherwick's Profile Photo

    Little Italy

    by Blatherwick Written Sep 26, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Little Italy

    Little Italy is a neighborhood in lower Manhattan, New York City, once known for its large population of Italian immigrants. Historically, Little Italy extended as far south as Bayard St, as far north as Bleecker, as far west as Lafayette, and as far east as the Bowery. As Italian-Americans left Manhattan for other boroughs and the suburbs in the middle of the Twentieth Century, the neighborhood recognizable as Little Italy gradually shrank. Today, the section of Mulberry Street between Broome and Canal Streets, lined with Italian restaurants popular with tourists, remains distinctly recognizable as Little Italy.

    I was lucky enough to be there for the Feast of San Gennaro. This is a large street fair, lasting 11 days, that takes place every September along Mulberry Street. Go on down, grab some pasta and some wine, and have fun.

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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Little Italy: Getting Smaller Everyday

    by mrclay2000 Written Apr 12, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    images of Little Italy

    Little Italy was once an ethnic enclave of great distinction arising from the great influx of Italian immigrants from the 19th and early 20th centuries. The neighborhood has now shrunk to a fraction of its former self. Generally boisterous and frolicsome as a race, the "Italian" in Little Italy is quiet and demur compared to the activity and commotion literally across the (Canal) street in Chinatown. There is no bright neon here or very little of it. You'll find no haggering in open air shops, and little in the way of trinkets or baubles or newsstands. What you will find is an ambiance of quiet culinary authenticity and a small dose of Mediterranean flair. The Italians have essentially moved away from the quarter. Chinese is spoken all around you before you enter Little Italy, where you'll almost have to enter a restaurant and listen carefully to hear Italian. The food generally is rich and wonderful as well as economical, and when coupled with the lively conversation between waiters in Italian the effect is magical.

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  • San Gennaro in Little Italy

    by Tom400C Updated Mar 19, 2005
    Little Italy

    It's not like we planned it but last time we were in New York it was the annual feast of San Gennaro in Little Italy. Food stands everywhere, Italian music, lots of people and a great atmosphere.

    Viva Italia !

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  • SnoopySue's Profile Photo

    Little Italy

    by SnoopySue Written Dec 29, 2004

    Picturesque touristically designed Italian neighbourhood is place bordering Chinatown. I am not sure about these restaurants but in one of small caffes I have found real Italian espresso and very good tartuffo (tasty chocolate cake).

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  • mht_in_la's Profile Photo

    Little Italy

    by mht_in_la Updated Jul 25, 2004
    Little Italy

    They used to say Canal Street separates Chinatown and Little Italy. But today it seems Little Italy is an enclave in Chinatown. What's unique about Little Italy is still the restaurants with outdoor seating, as seen in photo.

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  • FRONA's Profile Photo

    Very nice restaurants

    by FRONA Written Jul 16, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    little italy

    When immigrants from Southern Italy came to New York, they found themselves in "dumbbell" apartments. These apartments were so close together that no sunlight ever reached the lower windows or back yards.
    During the late 1800s over 40,000 people were crowded into this small 17-block area. Diseases, such as tuberculosis, were a part of daily life. Even with these hardships, the residents of Little Italy built a lively and colorful community with the sights, sounds, and flavors of their homeland.

    The Italian population of New York City's "Little Italy" has dwindled to fewer than 5,000 residents. Chinatown has expanded and replaced many of the original "Little Italy" neighborhoods.

    The Feast of San Gennaro (Fiesta di San Gennaro) is the most exciting annual event in the neighborhood, begining on September 19th and continuing for nine days. During this celebration, Mulberry Street is renamed Via San Gennaro and the shrines and relics of this saint are paraded through the streets. The crowds enjoy Italian foods of all types, as well as other ethnic dishes, and there is much singing and dancing.

    For visitors who enjoy eating, the restaurants in Little Italy offer reasonably priced food in quiet and friendly surroundings.

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  • sarahandgareth's Profile Photo

    Very Little Italy

    by sarahandgareth Written Jun 11, 2004

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    Little Italy

    The Little Italy of legend is fast disappearing - indeed, many would say it's already long gone. The area is shrinking, with Chinatown growing northwards, so that some streets have quite a mixture of Italian and Chinese names. And few Italians live in the area now, either: people commute downtown for work, but the most authentic Italian communities are elsewhere in the city, such as near Fordham university. Still, there's no denying the tourist appeal of Little Italy, and the narrow, bustling streets help perpetuate the image of a lively, slightly raucous area.

    These days, the waiters hustling for business occasionally seem as numerous as the visitors, and finding a place to eat can be hit or miss. A lot of the restaurants serve the same fare, so just try to compete on price and pick a place that looks like it does good business.

    Better yet, pop into several of the Italian stores, where you will still catch a sense of the old days, with people speaking Italian, buying magazines from the old country, or foods that you won't see your local supermarket. Best of all are the sandwich shops: take a place in line, pick out your hero, and they'll add salamis, cheeses, peppers and whatever you want, the whole thing drenched in olive oil and folded into a crusty roll. Find the nearest park and tuck into the very best that Little Italy has to offer!

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  • GlobalMatt's Profile Photo

    Little Italy

    by GlobalMatt Written Jan 17, 2004
    Little Italy

    When we go into Manhattan, we always stop in Little Italy to stock up on imported pastas, cheeses, sauces, & wines. We usually hit one of the local Italian restaurants for lunch as well. Here we are standing on Mulberry St. in Little Italy...my favorite part of town. I can't help it...my background is mostly Sicilian.

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