Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), New York City

4.5 out of 5 stars 68 Reviews

33 Street at Queens Blvd. Long Island City, Queens (212) 708-9400

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  • Lunch time at MoMA's Cafe 2
    Lunch time at MoMA's Cafe 2
    by Jefie
  • Matisse's
    Matisse's "The Dance" at NYC's MoMA
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  • Van Gogh's
    Van Gogh's "Starry Night" at the MoMA
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  • Tijavi's Profile Photo

    MoMA moment: The Sleeping Gypsy

    by Tijavi Updated Dec 17, 2011

    This is one of Henry Rousseau's most celebrated paintings for its dreamy effect, precision in the use of lines, and surrealistic colors,

    It is also perhaps one of Rousseau's most influential paintings over the younger generation of avant garde artists such as Picasso. All these seem impressive for a painter that never had formal training. Rousseau's daytime job was that of a toll collector in Paris; he harbored dreams of going to the Academy, but never actually made it there.

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    MoMA moment: The Persistence of Memory

    by Tijavi Updated Dec 17, 2011

    This smallish 9 1/2 x 13" painting by Salvador Dali is easy to miss, yet it's perhaps one of MoMA's most famous - and possibly - most haunting piece. The limp watches, the decay implied by the swarm of ants and the seemingly decomposing piece of flesh - some say a distorted self-portrait of the artist - have the potential to leave the viewer emotionally distressed.

    Definitely one of the most emotionally overwhelming paintings I've seen.

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    MoMA moment: I and the Village

    by Tijavi Updated Dec 17, 2011

    Painted a year after moving to Paris, I and the Village is Marc Chagall's way of reminiscing his life in a Jewish village near Vitebsk, Russia - in a distinctive Cubist manner. While Cubism mainly dealt with urban and avant-garde subjects, Chagall's use of rustic, let alone nostalgic scenes was a unique feature by itself, in addition to the evocative use of angles, lines and geometries.

    I vividly remember learning about this painting in school - in black and white textbooks - but to see the painting in all its colorful glory is something else. The use of bold colors over equally bold lines and angles was amazing.

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    MoMA moment: The Bather

    by Tijavi Updated Dec 17, 2011

    This extraordinary rendition of a classic subject (Google "the bather" and you get loads of links), is considered Paul Cezanne's modern take, in a very Impressionistic way. The unmuscled torso and arms were a major departure from the classical and Renaissance representations of the human body.

    Another sign of Cezanne's Impressionist streak was the subtle use, if any, of shadows and blacks. The subject, the bather, is surrounded by an almost empty expanse of landscape with his body seemingly in the same element as its surrounding.

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    MoMA moment: Retrospective Bust of a Woman

    by Tijavi Updated Dec 16, 2011

    One of the more interesting pieces in MoMA, not just for the artist behind it, but also for the side stories about it - like Picasso's dog eating the original bread (yes, a baguette!), on the head of the sculpture.

    Yes, a loaf of bread adorns the head of this sculpture, of a woman. Other "edible" parts are the two ears of corn on her shoulder and the ants (that is if you like eating ants) crawling through her forehead seemingly after the crumbs of bread. The sculpture is said to depict women as objects, not just for visual "admiration/stimulation" but also for consumption (hence, the edible parts, and the phallic-shaped bread).

    Whether this was Dali's way of criticizing the fetishness that characterized Surrealist sculptures (according to Dali), or his audition piece for joining the Surrealist fray, remains a mystery.

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    MoMA moment: Bell 47D1 helicopter

    by Tijavi Updated Dec 16, 2011
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    Hovering above the museum's atrium like a giant dragonfly, Arthur Young's Bell-47D1 helicopter has the distinction of being the first commercial helicopter licensed by the Civil Aeronautics Administration (now FAA). More than 3,000 of these helicopters were manufactured between 1945 and 1973, its last year of production. A versatile helicopter, its use varied from agriculture (to spray insecticides over large farm areas) to military (as aerial ambulance during the Korean War).

    Young's design was praised for its delicate beauty and efficiency, two seemingly contrasting ideas that were craftily unified by Young in this helicopter.

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    MoMA moment: She Goat

    by Tijavi Updated Dec 16, 2011

    Unabashedly a Picasso, this sculpture of a she goat at the Sculpture Garden, is made of discarded objects that Picasso found in a junk yard near his studio in the French town of Vallauris (in Cote d'Azur region). The junk yard was used by potters as a place to throw their waste mainly, metal and ceramics. The she goat's udder, arguably its most prominent part, is made of two discarded ceramic jugs. Great example of recycling, who could have thought such useless objects can be used to make what is possibly a very expensive sculpture!

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    MoMA moment: Broken Obelisk

    by Tijavi Updated Dec 16, 2011

    Fans of ancient Egyptian culture would find this steel sculpture by the American artist Barnett Newman fascinating - times two - as it both depicts and obelisk placed upside down on top of a pyramid!

    According to the MoMA website, the sculpture, which was completed at a time of unrest in the United States in the 1960s (remember Vietnam War, JFK's assassination?), represents the artist's lament of broken dreams and disappointments. It was meant to be a memorial, not to anyone, but to the whole society engulfed in turmoil.

    The sculpture is one of the more imposing works at the Sculpture Garden, an outdoor exhibit space for, what else, sculptures.

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    Museum of Modern Art

    by roamer61 Written Dec 11, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Vincent Van Gogh, A Starry Night

    The Museum of Modern Art or Moma as its affectionately known, is a great art museum featuring works of art in numerous mediums, from the second half of the 19th century to the present. Mediums include painting and sculpture, photography, architecture and design, drawings, books, prints and illustrations. There are also special exhibitions as well.
    The museum has several choices for dining a book shop and a museum shop as well as a theater.

    There is an admission charge of $25 for adults. Less for children and seniors. Photography is forbidden in special exbibition halls and only allowed in the regular galleries with no flash.

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    MoMA moments

    by Tijavi Updated Dec 11, 2011
    Arthur Bell's helicopter gracing the main atrium
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    Risking a bit of exaggerating here, but since my humanities class in college, where art was studied through black and white, newsprint textbooks (not unusual in a developing world context, plus the internet was not that popular during those days), I've always wanted to visit MoMA. I love the classics but somehow I've found modern art so fascinating - not the very "cutting edge" ones, but the classic/mainstream modern art (if there is such a thing), i.e., the Picassos, the Dalis and even those of pop art demigod, Andy Warhol. Indeed, the visit to MoMA, which took a good five hours, was a fulfilment of a long-nurtured desire. Unlike the Met where it was theoretically free to visit (donations are encouraged), the 25-dollar admission ticket to the MoMA, while in many cases too steep a ticket price (especially in the USA where many excellent museums can be visited free), was of no object when it came to MoMA (if you're really that stingy, MoMA is open to the public for free every Friday night, courtesy of Target).

    The next 18 entries focus on specific MoMA works - a bit too much, but please bear with me on this one as this is my way of documenting those precious five-hour MoMA moments.

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    Pablo Picasso Anyone?

    by machomikemd Written Oct 16, 2010

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    the museum
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    the huge museum land of truly abtsract thinking as the modern art is famously depticted and is touted to be the most influential modern art museum in the world. Lately is often eclipsed by the American Natural History Museum due to you Ben Stiller! (you too Robin Williams!) of the Night At The Museum Fame. The museum's collection offers an unparalleled overview in modern and contemporary art, including works of architecture and design, drawings, painting, sculpture, photography, prints, illustrated books and artist's books, film, and electronic media. MoMA's library and archives hold over 300,000 books, artist books, and periodicals, as well as individual files on more than 70,000 artists. The archives contain primary source material related to the history of modern and contemporary art. It also houses an award-winning fine dining restaurant, The Modern, run by Alsace-born chef Gabriel Kreuther. Admission is $ 20 and hours are from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm Need I say More?

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    Museum of Modern Art

    by apbeaches Written Jan 16, 2010

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    MOMA is often identified as the most influential museum of modern art in the world. The museum's collection offers an unparalleled overview of modern and contemporary art, including works of architecture and design, drawings, painting, sculpture, photography, prints, illustrated books and artist's books, film, and electronic media.

    MoMA's library and archives hold over 300,000 books, artist books, and periodicals, as well as individual files on more than 70,000 artists. The archives contain primary source material related to the history of modern and contemporary art. It also houses an award-winning fine dining restaurant, The Modern, run by Alsace-born chef Gabriel Kreuther.

    The idea for The Museum of Modern Art was developed in 1928 primarily by Abby Aldrich Rockefeller. She rented modest quarters for the new museum and it opened to the public on November 7, 1929, nine days after the Wall Street Crash. Abby had invited A. Conger Goodyear, the former president of the board of trustees of the Albright Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York, to become president of the new museum. Abby became treasurer. At the time, it was America's premier museum devoted exclusively to modern art, and the first of its kind in Manhattan to exhibit European modernism.

    When Abby Rockefeller's son Nelson was selected by the board of trustees to become its flamboyant president in 1939, at the age of thirty, he became the prime instigator and funder of its publicity, acquisitions and subsequent expansion into new headquarters on 53rd Street. His brother, David Rockefeller, also joined the museum's board of trustees, in 1948, and took over the presidency when Nelson took up position as Governor of New York in 1958. David subsequently employed the noted architect Philip Johnson to redesign the museum garden and name it in honor of his mother, the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden.

    MoMA's admission of $20.00 is the most expensive in the city; however it has free entry on Fridays after 4pm, thanks to sponsorship from Target Stores.

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    The MoMA

    by MM212 Updated Oct 17, 2009

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    MoMA

    Founded in 1928, the Museum of Modern Art, or MoMA as it is commonly known, is considered one of the most important modern art museums in the world. It is located in the heart of Midtown Manhattan, by the Rockefeller Center. It contains an impressive permanent collection of modern art and has frequent intriguing world-class exhibitions of art, architecture and design.

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    my favourite museum

    by PALLINA Updated Jul 13, 2009

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    Avoid to visit it on Friday evening as it is free. Considering the number of visitors ready to pay 20 usd to enter, I cannot imagine how full it can be when it's free. If you like arts starting from 1850, you will love this extraordinary collection. The bulding is also impressive and there are plenty of temporary exibitions.

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    Starry Nights and Campbell's Soup

    by goodfish Written Apr 6, 2009

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    Museum of Modern Art, NYC
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    I came here for one reason: to see Van Gogh's "The Starry Night". The nice lady at the information desk said "Oh yes, that's kind of our Mona Lisa - EVERYBODY wants to see that one!" It was well worth the kleenex (I'm a softy about this piece) and $20 museum ticket; what a moment.

    But it was time to move on so, nose blown and camera in hand, I wandered off to see what other wonders the galleries might hold. Modern art isn't usually my favorite but MOMA's collection kept me busy for at least half a day. The museum has 150,000 works that include paintings, sculpture, prints, drawings, photographs and film, and date from the late 1800's so there were plenty of the Impressionists that I love so much. Other works were funny, disturbing, angry, confusing, dark, cheerful serene, curious or powerful and the explosion of colors and textures made for few dull moments. This is another great outing for a rainy day.

    Many of the same rules apply as at the Met: no videocameras, flash or tripods, sketching only with pencils, etc. See the website for a preview of the collections, hours, ticket fees and other information. Closed Tuesdays.

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