St Patrick's Cathedral, New York City

4.5 out of 5 stars 88 Reviews

East 51st St, 5th Avenue.

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • St Patrick's Cathedral
    by Tijavi
  • Interior of St Patrick's
    Interior of St Patrick's
    by toonsarah
  • St Patrick's Cathedral
    by Tijavi
  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    A Roman Catholic Bastion in a Secular City part2

    by machomikemd Written Nov 18, 2010
    the cathedral
    4 more images

    more picture of Saint Patrick's Cathedral with my friends.

    St. Patrick's Cathedral is the largest decorated Neo-Gothic-style Catholic cathedral in North America. It is the seat of the archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, at 50th Street and Fifth Avenue in Manhattan, just across the street from Rockefeller Center.It is also the ceremonial heart of the city with many parades passing by it (see my parade tips). Its prominence is due in part to its location and architecture, and mainly because of the Large Roman Catholic Congregation in New York like the Irish-Americans and Italian-Americans.The first St. Patrick's was built in 1815 at 260-4 Mulberry Street between Prince and East Houston Streets but was burned down in 1868 and was rebuilt but downgraded to a parish church after completion of the new cathedral uptown on a site that had been purchased by the church as a burial ground. With its two soaring 330-foot spires, it is also one of the city's most spectacular architectural sights. Construction on the neo-gothic structure was begun in 1850 and completed in 1878. Inside, Services are held throughout the day, and many New Yorkers stop in for a moment of serenity in their otherwise hectic days. I will have more pictures and tips here due to a revisit in 2010.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    A Roman Catholic Bastion in a Secular City part1

    by machomikemd Updated Nov 18, 2010

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Outside St. Patrick's Cathedral
    4 more images

    St. Patrick's Cathedral is the largest decorated Neo-Gothic-style Catholic cathedral in North America. It is the seat of the archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, at 50th Street and Fifth Avenue in Manhattan, just across the street from Rockefeller Center.It is also the ceremonial heart of the city with many parades passing by it (see my parade tips). Its prominence is due in part to its location and architecture, and mainly because of the Large Roman Catholic Congregation in New York like the Irish-Americans and Italian-Americans.The first St. Patrick's was built in 1815 at 260-4 Mulberry Street between Prince and East Houston Streets but was burned down in 1868 and was rebuilt but downgraded to a parish church after completion of the new cathedral uptown on a site that had been purchased by the church as a burial ground. With its two soaring 330-foot spires, it is also one of the city's most spectacular architectural sights. Construction on the neo-gothic structure was begun in 1850 and completed in 1878. Inside, Services are held throughout the day, and many New Yorkers stop in for a moment of serenity in their otherwise hectic days. I will have more pictures and tips here due to a revisit in 2010.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • apbeaches's Profile Photo

    St. Patrick's Cathedral

    by apbeaches Written Jan 16, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Neo-Gothic-style Catholic cathedral church is the seat of the archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York. In December we visit the tree, enjoy the festive holiday windows and Cathedral in Rockefeller Center. The cathedral is built of brick and covered with marble and can accommodate 2,200 people. The spires rise 330 feet from street level.
    The Saint Michael and Saint Louis altar was designed by Tiffany & Co. The Saint Elizabeth altar was designed by Paolo Medici of Rome, Italy.

    The land was purchased for $11,000 on March 6, 1810, as a site for a school for young Roman Catholic men, the New York Literary Institution, to be conducted by the Jesuits. The school closed and was sold to the diocese. In 1814, the diocese gave use of the property to Dom Augustin LeStrange, abbot of a community of Trappists who came to America fleeing persecution by French authorities. With the downfall of Napoleon in that year, the Trappists returned to France, abandoning the property.

    The Diocese of New York, created in 1808, was made an archdiocese by Pope Pius IX on July 19, 1850. In 1853, Archbishop John Joseph Hughes announced his intention to erect a new cathedral to replace the Old Saint Patrick's Cathedral in downtown Manhattan. The new cathedral was designed by James Renwick, Jr. in the Gothic Revival style. On August 15, 1858, the cornerstone was laid, just south of the diocese's orphanage. At that time, present-day midtown Manhattan was far north of the populous areas of New York City. Its huge proportions dominating the midtown of that time. The stained-glass windows in the Lady Chapel were designed and made in Chipping Campden, England. The cathedral was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1976

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Saint Patrick's Old Cathedral

    by MM212 Updated Nov 6, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Gothic interior - Nov 09
    3 more images

    Before the construction of Saint Patrick's Cathedral in Midtown, this smaller Gothic church, now known as Saint Patrick's Old Cathedral, was the seat of the Roman Catholic archdiocese of New York. It was built in 1809 by the architect Joseph-François Mangin, who also designed the extant City Hall building. A fire nearly destroyed the church in 1866, but it was swiftly rebuilt to the form we see today. It remained as New York's Catholic cathedral until 1879. The simple exterior of the church hides a beautiful Gothic interior that is well worth a peek inside.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Saint Patrick's Cathedral

    by MM212 Updated Oct 13, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    St Patrick's Cathedral from above - Aug 08
    4 more images

    The largest Gothic church in the US, Saint Patrick’s Cathedral is the seat of the Roman Catholic Archbishop of New York. The Cathedral was designed in a Gothic revival style by James Renwick, a renowned 19th century American architect, who incorporated German, French and English Gothic elements in his design. Although the Cathedral opened its doors in 1879, it was not until 1888 that the two 100-metre high spires were completed. The Cathedral is located in the heart of Manhattan at one of the most prestigious locations on Fifth Avenue and 50th Street.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • miniman2804's Profile Photo

    A splendid cathedral in the heart of secular NYC

    by miniman2804 Written Oct 11, 2009
    1 more image

    It is a fine view - a quintissential nineteenth century cathedral in the medieval style (or whatever), in among the skyscrapers and temples to Mammon of Midtown. I think this sort of thing demonstrates why NYC is a special place, as it has areas that are among the oldest in USA.

    This is the Catholic cathedral. I think St Barts on Park Avenue is the Anglican version.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

    Was this review helpful?

  • goodfish's Profile Photo

    Best Free thing #13

    by goodfish Written Mar 15, 2009

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Baptistry, St. Patrick's
    3 more images

    St. Patrick's is the largest Gothic-style cathedral in the United States and seat of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York. In 1858, when construction began, this bustling section of 5th Avenue was virtually open country and its visionary, Archbishop John Hughes, held to ridicule for its considerable distance from the city. The architect, James Renwick, also designed the Smithsonian Institute's well-known "Castle" in Washington DC.

    The church holds about 2,200 people and has beautiful windows crafted in France, England and Boston, several alters designed by Tiffany and Co., and a solid bronze baldachin over the high altar. Eight archbishops are buried in St Patrick's crypt, and funeral masses were held here for New York Yankees Babe Ruth and Billy Martin, football legend Vince Lombardi, singer Celia Cruz, Senator Robert F. Kennedy, and many of 9/11's fallen police and firefighters.

    Visitors are welcome daily from 6:30 am to 8:45. See the website for service schedule.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Budget Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    An oasis of calm

    by toonsarah Written Nov 12, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Spires of St Patrick's
    3 more images

    St Patrick’s neo-Gothic grandeur is all the more striking for being surrounded by the glitz and skyscrapers of mid-town Fifth Avenue. But it wasn’t always like that. When the cathedral was built, in the mid-nineteenth century, this location was so far outside the city centre, in an area of relative wilderness, that people thought it was mad to locate the cathedral here. Today the cathedral is the centre for the Roman Catholic Church in the city and indeed in the US as a whole, and is also a major tourist destination. There are of course many beautiful statues, windows, chapels and more, as in any cathedral, but for me the loveliest thing about this one in particular is that contrast between it and its surroundings; it is truly a haven of peace in all the wonderful madness of this amazing city.

    Even if you’re not religious you may find it an uplifting experience to attend a Mass here, as we did (my husband Chris is a Catholic). The choir is wonderful, and it is inspiring to experience this space as it was intended to be used rather than as simply a beautiful museum. But however and whenever you choose to visit, please don’t miss this oasis of calm in the city that never sleeps.

    The cathedral is open every day from 6.30 AM to 8.45 PM. If you wish to attend a service, there is a full schedule on the cathedral’s website. Photography is allowed, including with flash, except during a service, and I noticed also that sightseers are excluded from the main body of the cathedral while a service is in progress, which is as it should be (so if you don’t want to attend a service you should also maybe check out the schedule above as a clash could considerably limit your opportunities for a good look round). No charge is made for admission but you should consider making a donation towards the upkeep of the building and/or making a purchase in the gift shop.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • risse73's Profile Photo

    St. Patrick's Cathedral

    by risse73 Updated Oct 7, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    St. Patrick's Cathedral
    1 more image

    This cathedral is a landmark in NY. You will be awed at this grand and imposing structure in the heart of mid-Manhattan. It is a beloved place of worship for many locals and visitors. I attended the noon mass and it was a pretty solemn affair. The new Pope (Pope Benedict) was a recent visitor.

    Related to:
    • Theater Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • taylo365's Profile Photo

    A Religious Experience

    by taylo365 Written May 23, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    St. Patrick's in my opinion was the most amazing piece of architecture I was able to see in New York City. The Neo-Gothic architecture is stunning and the tranquility of the inner chamber is an experience in itself. St. Patrick's was constructed in 1810 and changed hands many time in the last few centuries. It is now the seat of New York City's Archbishop and a celebrated tourist destination for all those visiting the city. Visiting this beautiful cathedral should be a must for any tourist, and that won't be difficult considering it is located on Manhattan not from from Central Park and Rockefeller Center.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    An architectural wonder on Fifth Avenue

    by Jefie Updated Mar 19, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    St. Patrick's Cathedral, on 5th Avenue
    2 more images

    To see the 330 foot tall spires of St. Patrick's Cathedral suddenly appear is one of the joys of walking down 5th Avenue for the very first time! Back in 1850, Archbishop John Hughes decided to have a new Cathedral built on what was then the outskirts of the city. St. Patrick's Cathedral was completed in 1879, and to this day it remains the largest gothic-style cathedral in the United States and it can sit close to 2,500 people. What was once referred to as "Hugues' folly" became the heart of the New York City Catholic community, which swelled thanks to the constant flow of immigrants (back in 1785, there were only 200 Catholics and one priest in the entire city). Nowadays, people come from all over the world to admire the Cathedral's stained windows, Lady Chapel and numerous pieces of religious art work. It was of particular interest to me to find out that American writer F. Scott Fitzgerald and Zelda Sayre got married there in 1920. I also really enjoyed the fact that the lights were kept low in the Cathedral - this helped keep the solemn character and atmosphere of the place, even if there were dozens of people walking around with cameras. It did however make the shock of going back on busy 5th Avenue all the more bigger!

    The Cathedral is open everyday from 6:30 am to 8:45 pm, free of charge.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    St. Patricks

    by BruceDunning Updated Nov 20, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Spires are the moniker
    4 more images

    A great deal has been steeped with tradition at this monument. St. Patricks is a stopping place for religious and otherwise. It is an icon of the city. It started in 1810 when the land was purchased and it became an orphange. The latest structure on the site was built in 1858, but due to the war delaying completion, it did not get done until 1878. The Gothic spirres and white marble facade are wow. Spires are 330 feet. It is the seat for New York of the Catholic Archdiose

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Paul2001's Profile Photo

    St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York

    by Paul2001 Updated Oct 29, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The interior and Main Altar of St. Patrick's Cathe
    1 more image

    Although most travellers do not think of New York as being a city of churches there are many fine religious buildings here. Probably most notable in St. Patrick's Cathedral. This neo-Gothic church was designed in 1859 and begun shortly thereafter. However it was not completed until 1903. As far as neo-Gothic cathedrals go it is probably a fine as one you are going to find in America. What probably is most capturing about the building is all the white marble. This place seems almost to glow. Still I found the place a bit sterile. This probably because of the lack of any real "art" inside of the church and nothing to so much to remind you that you are in one of the great world metropolises. Regardless it is considered to be one of the most important Catholic churches in the USA. It's congregation consists of 2,200 people. As you would expect for such a large city, the cathedral is huge.
    The St. Patrick's Cathedral is open from 7am to 8:30pm daily.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • HotRodEtte's Profile Photo

    Beauty inside and out

    by HotRodEtte Written Sep 12, 2007
    Front of Cathedral
    2 more images

    We checked out St. Patrick's Cathedral as we were outside walking around doing the touristy stuff. We also went inside and stood in the back as Sunday mass wsa taking place. For $2 donation you can light a candle - I lit one for a sick relative.
    If you go on Sunday there will be ropes to keep the tourists from interfering in Sunday mass.

    Was this review helpful?

  • traveloturc's Profile Photo

    St. Patrick's Cathedral

    by traveloturc Written Aug 4, 2007
    St. Patrick's Cathedral

    St. Patrick’s Cathedral, situated on Fifth Avenue near Rockefeller Center, is actually the “new” St. Patrick’s. The original church opened in 1815 on Mulberry Street in lower Manhattan. During the next several decades, the Catholic population of New York City continued to rise, and in 1853, Archbishop Hughes declared that the city’s faithful should have a new place to worship.The doors of the cathedral finally opened in 1879, fifteen years after Hughes’ death.
    The ornate Lady Chapel was constructed in 1900, complete with magnificent stained glass windows crafted in England, added gradually over the next 25 years.
    A recent chapel was added in homage to the Polish saint, Our Lady of Czestochowa.
    110 meters long, 58 meters wide
    The 36m high nave has a seating capacity of 2500
    Inspired by the Cathedral in Cologne

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: New York City

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

90 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near St Patrick's Cathedral
4.5 out of 5 stars
0.1 miles away
Show Prices
4.5 out of 5 stars
1 Review
0.1 miles away
Show Prices
4.5 out of 5 stars
9 Reviews
0.1 miles away
Show Prices

View all New York City hotels