Statue of Liberty - Ellis Island, New York City

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  • Statue of Liberty - Ellis Island
    by Tijavi
  • Statue of Liberty - Ellis Island
    by Turska
  • Statue of Liberty - Ellis Island
    by Turska
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    Ellis island

    by Turska Written Apr 21, 2014

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    I had seen this place at some documentary films and really hoping to see the whole museum and the top floor rooms witch seemed to be most interesting.
    The tickest (to Eliis island, and walking around statue of Liberty) were 25 dollars, much more than in most quite new books. And because of that, it didn´t even cross my mind, that the top floor could have been closed. Still because of the hurrigane Sandy two years earlier. I know it made a lot of damage, but I just think that the price of the ticket was way too much, when the top floor was closed. At ground floor there was only photos and documents you might have seen on internet. In this situation the ticket should have been a lot cheapaer!
    It felt quite a waste of money to see only this.
    And a warning: The "cafe" is very expensive! I have never had as expensive potato crisps (I´m glad we did only took one 25g bag!), tiny brownie and a small (really small, 275 ml or something) bottle of Coke. The prices weren´t shown to most of things, and it was quite shocking to find out how much all of this cost. Was it 13 dollars or something. And there was no tips in that price (we didn´t gave any, the weithers were tptally bored looking and unfriendly, and everything over priced).

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    Statue of Liberty

    by Turska Written Apr 21, 2014
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    We had a quite new guide book saying, that you can buy a ticket to Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island in about 10 dollars, and with that ticket you will get to the Liberty island, and the museum of the statue, but not to the top of it.
    It was off season when we went, but still the cheapest ticket (witch we thought would get to the museum) was 25 dollar, and we didn´t get anywhere inside the statue. We tried to find the entrance to the museum , but it was only to people who had bought the ticket witch include the getting up to the crown. Those tickets were limited per day, and all gone at noon. I wouldn´t even want to climb up, but I really would have liked to see the museum.
    So I think it was quite expensive ticket, when you could only walk around (and at the Ellis island the top floor was closed also, still the ticket was more expensive than in coupple of years ago printed book)
    But maybe we would have gone anyway. I don´t think the Staten island ferry went close enough, if you want to take photos and see the statue.
    Funny thing was, that after Manhattan, it didn´t look as big as we thought! If someone would build that thing in some European town, it would look much bigger, I think!.

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    Ellis Island

    by travelfrosch Updated Mar 6, 2014

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    Ellis Island from the ferry
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    UPDATE: Ellis Island is still undergoing repairs due to damage from Hurricane Sandy, but it is currently open on a limited basis. See the website for details.

    When you visit the Statue of Liberty, be sure to visit Ellis Island as well. This place has special meaning to many Americans because this is the first U.S. soil our ancestors set foot on. As you enter the beautifully restored building and its main hall, also take a look at the many photos and exhibits in the side rooms. Especially poignant are the relics encased in glass -- a part of the everyday life of those who spent time here, but then literally left to rot when the facility was abandoned in 1954.

    While there are a few boats that provide service to the island, the one sanctioned by the National Park Service is Statue Cruises. Ferries depart to Liberty Island and Ellis Island from the Battery Park area of Manhattan, as well as Liberty State Park in New Jersey. Be aware the lines will be extremely long, especially during peak season. Your best bet to avoid a long wait are to visit off-season and early in the morning. Be aware security measures are very tight, and you will be required to pass through an airport-style metal detector before boarding the ferry.

    Round-trip fare from Manhattan or New Jersey is $12. Limited "appointment" tickets are available online, but these only save you the time waiting at the ticket window; you still need to go through the metal detector.

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    Finding my Grandfather - Ellis Island

    by Donna_in_India Updated Jan 5, 2014

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    The Great Hall - Ellis Island
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    Over 12 million immigrants passed through Ellis Island from 1892 to 1954 and an amazing one half of the U.S. population can trace their roots back to Ellis Island. They came from different parts of Europe in hopes of finding a better life and realizing the "American dream". They often traveled for weeks under difficult circumstances for the opportunity.

    They sailed passed the Statue of Liberty, a welcoming sight, before arriving at Ellis Island where they waited in the Great Hall for processing in the registry room. Almost a century later, as I stood overlooking the enormous Great Hall, I had goosebumps thinking of how my own relatives must have felt when they first
    arrived.

    Today the story of these immigrants is told through permanent exhibits at the Ellis Island Immigration Museum. Along with the Great Hall, you'll be able to see the Dormitory with separate sleeping quarters for male/female detainees, the Baggage Room where meager possessions were checked, and the Medical Examining Rooms where any immigrant found to have a contagious disease could be sent back home. But it's the photos and actual voice recordings of the immigrants' stories that are amazing, joyful, and chilling, and make the deepest impression. Outside the museum is the American Immigrant Wall of Honor, the largest wall of names in the World.

    For me the most exciting part of my visit happened in the research library. Computers fill the room and enable you to search by name, year of arrival, year of birth, town of origin, and the ship name of immigrants who passed through Ellis Island. There are volunteers to help you with any questions. I was so excited to find my own grandfather's information - he came from Copenhagen. I was shocked to find out that he came as a 14 year old - on his own - as a member of the crew - a cabin boy!! The volunteer told me they'd never had anyone who was related to a member of the crew. I was able to print out the passenger manifest with all his details as well as a photo of the ship. I happily shared that with my grandmother who had no idea of the details. You can do your own free search for relatives here.

    You reach Ellis Island via ferry operated by Statue Cruises from either Battery Park - at the southernmost tip of Manhattan - or from Liberty State Park in Jersey City, New Jersey. The crowds are bigger - and the lines much longer - at Battery Park.

    Liberty State Park itself is a really nice park overlooking lower Manhattan. The ticket building is the old Central Railroad of New Jersey Terminal (CRRNJ). It, along with the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, played a major part in the immigration of Europeans into the U.S. Greeted by Lady Liberty, processed at Ellis Islands, immigrants boarded trains at the terminal to their new homes throughout the U.S.

    Also at Liberty State Park is the Empty Sky 9/11 Memorial. The park was directly across from the World Trade Towers. Today two long walls flank a path that is center line of the former World Trade Center tower GPS coordinates. It is eerie to look down through the middle of the path and see - or not see - what was there.

    It is more convenient for me to go to the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island from Liberty State Park but if you have a choice, that would be mine.

    After a security screening you board the ferry for the short ride to Ellis Island. Coming from NJ the route is Liberty State Park-Ellis Island-Statue of Liberty. From Manhattan it's Battery Park-Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island. (Once at Liberty Island you can hop on a ferry to Liberty Liberty State Park to see the Terminal/Memorial. You'll then need to get back to Statue of Liberty/Ellis Island to transfer back to Battery Park. Be sure to watch the ferry timings so you don't miss the last one back!) If you are visiting in the colder months, it will be cold and windy on deck - have a hat/scarf handy.

    Ellis Island is a UNESCO World Heritage Site as well as part of the U.S. National Park Service (be sure to get your NPS Passport book stamped).

    Check the website for hours and reservation information. Hours are adjusted seasonally.

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    Statue of Liberty

    by Donna_in_India Updated Jan 5, 2014

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    Lady Liberty

    A gift from the French people to the American people, the Statue of Liberty is a universal symbol of freedom. Work on the statue started in the early 1870's. Completion was stalled several times due to a lack of funds, but Lady Liberty was finally dedicated on October 28, 1886. Standing on Liberty Island in the middle of NY Harbor, she was a welcoming sight to immigrants arriving from abroad on their way to Ellis Island. Even today there is something about her that makes you feel proud and safe.

    Although green in color, the statue is made of bronze. From the base of the pedestal to the tip of her torch, she is 305 feet tall. The statue itself is 111 feet tall and weighs a whopping 225 tons. The corroded original golden torch was replaced in 1986. The flame in the new torch is coated in 24k gold leaf. Over 350 steps lead from the entrance to her crown. The seven spikes of the crown represent the seven seas and the seven continents. I remember school field trips as a child up to her crown. Over the years access to the crown has been on and off. It is currently back on - but advance bookings must be made - as much as 6 months in advance. You need to be in good physical shape to make the climb but it is definitely worth it! You can also visit the pedestal - again advance bookings must be made.

    You reach Liberty Island via ferry operated by Statue Cruises from either Battery Park - at the southernmost tip of Manhattan - or from Liberty State Park in Jersey City, New Jersey. The crowds are bigger - and the lines much longer - at Battery Park.

    Liberty State Park itself is a really nice park overlooking lower Manhattan. The ticket building is the old Central Railroad of New Jersey Terminal (CRRNJ). It, along with the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, played a major part in the immigration of Europeans into the U.S. Greeted by Lady Liberty, processed at Ellis Islands, immigrants boarded trains at the terminal to their new homes throughout the U.S.

    Also at Liberty State Park is the Empty Sky 9/11 Memorial. The park was directly across from the World Trade Towers. Today two long walls flank a path that is center line of the former World Trade Center tower GPS coordinates. It is eerie to look down through the middle of the path and see - or not see - what was there.

    It is more convenient for me to go to the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island from Liberty State Park but if you have a choice, that would be mine.

    After a security screening you board the ferry for the short ride to Liberty Island. Coming from NJ the route is Liberty State Park-Ellis Island-Statue of Liberty. From Manhattan it's Battery Park-Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island. (Once at Liberty Island you can hop on a ferry to Liberty Liberty State Park to see the Terminal/Memorial. You'll then need to get back to Statue of Liberty/Ellis Island to transfer back to Battery Park. Be sure to watch the ferry timings so you don't miss the last one back!)

    There are plenty of opportunities on the ferry to photograph lower Manhattan and the Statue of Liberty as you get closer and closer to her. If you are visiting in the colder months, it will be cold and windy on deck - have a hat/scarf handy.

    Once you arrive on the Island, head to the Visitor Information Center to pick up a guide and brochure. Audio guides are also available. If you don't have a booking for the pedestal or the crown, you'll walk around Liberty Island. The island is a total of 14 acres. You'll be able to admire the Statue of Liberty from all angles and take plenty of photos. There are coin operated binoculars pointing towards Manhattan and you'll have wonderful panoramic views of New York Harbor. There are plenty of green grassy areas (and benches) to take a break. There are some snack kiosks as well as a self-serve restaurant and two gift shops.

    The Statue of Liberty is a UNESCO World Heritage Site as well as part of the U.S. National Park Service (be sure to get your NPS Passport book stamped in one of the gift shops).

    Check the website for hours and reservation information. Hours are adjusted seasonally. The highest visitation occurs during the months of June through September and can be high during holiday and weekend periods throughout the year.

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    Lady Liberty

    by acebruin Updated Dec 20, 2013

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    This is a must visit place for a first timer in the Big Apple. If you've been here once, there's nothing much to see. Take lots of pictures with Lady Liberty. Take the ferry to get here from Battery Park. The ferry ride to the island was very enjoyable. Make sure you have your camera out and ready as you pass by the front of the statue.

    Don't forget to get the audio tour if you want to learn about the monument. We didn't bother waiting in line to go inside of the statue. We've heard it's not worth the wait.

    If you need inspiration, come to this place and relax. Beautiful view of the city from across the bay.

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    Celebrating Irving R. Feldman's Birthday (Part 2)

    by travelfrosch Updated Jul 27, 2013

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    UPDATE: Liberty Island and the Statue of Liberty are once again open to the public. Ellis Island remains closed.

    The Weather Lady said it was going to be a beautiful day, so we went to the Statue of Liberty.

    For many visitors to New York, going to Liberty Island is a required event. While there are a few boats that provide service to the island, the one sanctioned by the National Park Service is Statue Cruises. Ferries depart to Liberty Island and Ellis Island from the Battery Park area of Manhattan, as well as Liberty State Park in New Jersey. Be aware the lines will be extremely long, especially during peak season. Your best bet to avoid a long wait are to visit off-season and early in the morning. Be aware security measures are very tight, and you will be required to pass through an airport-style metal detector before boarding the ferry.

    Round-trip fare from Manhattan or New Jersey is $12. Limited "appointment" tickets are available online, but these only save you the time waiting at the ticket window; you still need to go through the metal detector.

    As for entering the statue itself, a limited number of free "monument passes" are given to ticket holders on a first-come, first-served basis. While entry to the monument is free, there is an extremely long wait time (up to 2 hours) to get through yet another security checkpoint and enter the statue (NOTE: while you can procure a "monument pass" in advance online, you still must stand in the lengthy security line with everyone else). Note also backpacks are not allowed; free lockers are provided at the entry to the security line. Once inside the pedestal, you can see a modest museum and are allowed to climb to the top of the base. You are not allowed to climb inside the statue, however. Personally, I didn't think it was worth the 90 minutes we waited to get through security.

    Food and beverages are available on Liberty Island, but the food is rather expensive and the quality is mediocre at best. I choked down a greasy and cold burger that cost $8. Your best bet is probably to buy a snack on the boat (hot dog $3, nachos $5).

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    Statue of Liberty

    by antistar Updated Jun 1, 2013

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    Statue of Liberty, New York
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    The symbol of New York - the symbol of freedom and liberty - it's one of the greatest symbols of America and the world: The Statue of Liberty. Her enduring image was the first thing that millions of newly arrived immigrants to the US saw, welcoming them to their new home. She is like the Colossus of Rhodes, marking the entrance to New York with a burning torch symbolising the spirit of independence and a broken chain at her feet symbolising freedom.

    But for all the statue celebrates American ideals it was actually a gift to the US from the French. It was envisaged and lobbied for by French sculptor Frédéric Bartholdi, and it was designed and built, in France, by the great French architect Gustave Eiffel. The statue's iconic crowned head was first exhibited at the Paris World's Fair.

    The statue stands on what is now Liberty Island, the first of the Hudson islands as you approach from the Atlantic. It gets over three million visitors a year, all of whom must come by ferry, and it is one of the most oversubscribed sights in New York, so expect enormous queues.

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    STATUE OF LIBERTY

    by LoriPori Written May 14, 2013

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    Statue of Liberty
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    Saturday, May 4, 2013
    As part of our Bus Tour to New York City, our group went on a Circle Line Sightseeing Cruise. To me, the highlight was seeing the STATUE OF LIBERTY for the first time. The boat got pretty close, so we were able to take some pictures of this iconic statue. Our original itinerary had us going to Liberty Island, but Liberty Island is closed due to the effects of Hurricane Sandy. The Island and Statue will reopen to the public by July 4, 2013.
    The Statue of Liberty was a gift from the people of France to the people of the United States and is a symbol of Freedom and Democracy. The Statue, located in New York Harbor on Liberty Island (south of Ellis Island), is of a robed female figure representing LIBERTAS, the Roman goddess of Freedom. She bears a torch and a tablet on which is inscribed the date of the American Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776.
    In 1984, the Statue of Liberty was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site

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    Liberty Island

    by solopes Updated Mar 17, 2013

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    There is nothing relevant in this island: the statue is there, but it is better seen from distance. The main attraction of this visit is... the trip. The sight of the statue, the unforgettable sight of Manhattan, Ellis Island...

    No visit to New York City will be completed without this experience, that you must have starting from Battery park or Liberty State Park, in Newark.

    I did it in both ways, and got the idea that, in high season, Newark may be an easier and quicker starting point. At least it was in... December.

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    Lady Liberty and the gateway to freedom

    by etfromnc Updated Dec 22, 2012

    Among the world’s most recognizable icons, Lady Liberty rises majestically over New York Harbor, her torch once firing the hopes of millions of immigrants. Neighboring Ellis Island is the place to learn about the "huddled masses yearning to breathe free" that passed through its doors. My visit to the Statue of Liberty was the week before Christmas in 2008 and the high temperature that day was 17 degrees F. Even so, the ferries and all of the on-island facilities were packed so I cannot even begin to imagine how crowded things must be during good weather. Every American should probably visit at least once but I think that I will admire her from the air and elsewhere in the city in the future. I would like to return to Ellis Island, however.

    Originally designed and built in Paris by the French sculptor Bartholdi, assisted in the steel engineering work by Gustave Eiffel, this beautiful monument which now towers over New York harbor was a gift from France to the American people on the centennial of US independence in 1886. The design, construction, de-construction, transport, and reconstruction of this massive statue was considered one of the greatest technical engineering feats of the 19th Century and is considered as one of the greatest examples of bridging between art and engineering. She is also considered as a masterful tribute to the human spirit as she endures well into her second century as a symbol of human ideals of virtue, liberty, peace, human rights, freedom from slavery, democracy, and opportunity.

    May God bless the freedoms which she symbolizes and the nations which built her and now house her.

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    Long lines if you dont get there early!

    by WBeall Written Sep 15, 2012

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    Steven and I started our day early and took the subway straight to the Statue of Liberty ticket counter and we are sure glad we did!

    Again like my other post in NYC we have purchased the New York Pass before going. When we arrived at the ticket counter we walked right up to the special line and then right on the ferry to go to Liberty island... No lines what so ever!

    The ferry is maybe a 10 min ride.

    When you get to Liberty Island you can walk all around the island and take pictures or go straight up into the Liberty. Inside the Liberty there is a museum that explains all about the building of Liberty and ext. Then you take the million stairs just to get to the first part. If you have tickets to the Pedestal or the crown then you will not need to work out for another year! Okay okay they also have an elevator. (192 steps to the Pedestal and 354 steps to the crown)

    after you are done touring the Statue of Liberty then you take the ferry over to Ellis island. We did not get off the ferry here so I cant give you much info on Ellis Island but I do here it has a great tour.

    for both tours I would give yourself at least 5 hours or more.

    When we arrived back into NYC the lines for the ferry to get to the Statue and Ellis, were so long people said they were waiting 3 hours and they still had more to go. :(

    So my main suggestion here would be to get there EARLY!!!

    Also I hear the parking is bad in the Manhatten area so try to not drive your own car, instead take the subway, bus, or taxi!!

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    Ellis Island

    by solopes Updated Aug 31, 2012

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    Ellis Island - USA
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    In my first time in New York I went to the Liberty statue. Of course.

    It was there, and it is exactly as I imagined. In my last time I went to Ellis island, and found it much more interesting.

    It's a well conceived museum, showing the human story of the USA, allowing everybody to feel a little bit of him (or his family, or his nation, or his race) in the building of the country. Very touching.

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    Ellis Island

    by Tom_Fields Updated Aug 3, 2012

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    Ellis Island
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    This is where millions of immigrants from Europe were introduced to America, given their papers, and sworn in as citizens. From 1892 to 1924, this was the country's largest and busiest immigration center. The entire process took an average of three to seven hours.

    The museum tells the story of this unique place, and highlights just a handful of stories about those who passed through it.

    Like the Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island is accessible only by ferry. See the second web site below for more information.

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    Statue of Liberty

    by Tom_Fields Updated Aug 3, 2012

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    The iconic Statue of Liberty is probably America's most celebrated symbol. It was a gift from the people of France, designed by Auguste Bartholdi. Eugene Viollet-le-Duc and Alexandre-Gustave Eiffel were the engineers involved. General Charles P. Stone designed the pedestal. Construction began in 1880. The entire structure was finally complete in 1886. Additional features were added later.

    The entire structure (including the pedestal) stands 305 feet. Tours should be booked well in advance, especially in summer and on weekends. If you wish to go inside the Crown, then book it right now. Those tickets are sold out months in advance. Go to the Statue Cruises website below for that.

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