Statue of Liberty - Ellis Island, New York City

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  • Tijavi's Profile Photo

    Descendants of Ellis

    by Tijavi Updated Feb 10, 2012

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    Ellis Island is arguably the most important symbol of the positive benefits of immigration - even today. Official estimates indicate that 4 out of 10 Americans can trace their ancestry to at least one Ellis Island immigrant. That's 40% of 300+ million.

    A tour of Ellis Island is essential to understanding - in my own peculiar way - why these immigrants were so successful in populating a massive expanse of land mass, and helping make it into a global superpower.

    The stringent physical and mental examination done on these immigrants means that only the fittest get to start a new life in the new world (the island has a rejection rate of 2%, according to Wikipedia).

    This "survival of the fittest theory" perhaps explains why so many Americans are descendants of Ellis Island immigrants? What do you think?

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    Give me your tired and not-so-poor tourists

    by Tijavi Updated Feb 10, 2012

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    Gone are the days when the Statue of Liberty welcomed immigrants - mainly from Europe - to this land of milk and honey. Today, a more modern version of the poet Emma Lazarus' famous line in her sonnet The New Colussus, "Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free," would be more relevant to tourists visiting Liberty Island.

    Tired and huddled? Yes, taking into account the amount of time one queues up for the tour.

    But poor? Definitely no - at least relative to probably billions of other inhabitants in this planet - with the 13-dollar-per-person ferry ride.

    Worth it? Definitely, if you're a first time visitor to NYC. No visit to NYC is complete without seeing this iconic statue.

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    The marvelous Manhattan skyline

    by Tijavi Updated Feb 10, 2012

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    One of the most strategic vantage points for viewing the famous Manhattan skyline is Liberty Island. Having a pair binoculars would come handy - or if you have none of that, a good DSLR lens, which also allows you to take pictures of Manhattan's famous skyline.

    It's a bonus when you're lucky with the weather - the skyline looks stunning against clear blue skies. If you have a bit flexibility with your schedule, it would be best to check the weather forecast to maximize photo opportunities.

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    Don't miss Ellis Island out!

    by Benson35 Written Feb 6, 2012

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    This tour was one of the highlights of my time in New York. I am so glad that I did it and urge you not to miss it out.
    We got a ferry from Battery Park which stopped at Liberty Island and Ellis Island.
    We didn't get off at Liberty Island as you had a fantastic view of 'The Staute of Liberty' or sometimes known as 'Lady Liberty' from the ferry. We also thought that with not being able to climb Lady Liberty at that time, we would spend more time on Ellis Island.
    For a small cost, we hired an audio tour (an iPod) and it was the best few dollars we spent. You can take the tour at your own pace with the option to pause the tour when you want to spend more time in/at a particular feature. To get onto and into Ellis Island, there is no cost. If you wish to walk around the buildings yourself, you are very welcome to, again, without cost.

    With not having any prior knowledge of what Ellis Island was I was fasinated as the tour began. Ellis Island was used as a way into New York City as an immigrant from 1892-1954. More than 12 million immigrants passed through the doors.
    The audio tour explain how the immigrants were treated and what they had to go through before being able to start a new life in New York. For example, a medical had to be preformed. Adults and children were marked with huge crosses on their clothes in accordance to what the Doctors found, and families were separated.

    There is a museum and cafe there also

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    Lady Liberty

    by Tijavi Updated Feb 4, 2012

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    Hundreds, if not thousands, of articles - including here on VT - have been written on the Statue of Liberty. This is not unexpected considering this French gift to the American people is one of the most visited sites in America. Cliche as it sounds - it's a must-see for first time visitors to NYC.

    Being my first time in NYC, I, too went to see Lady Liberty. I too, braved the long queue, the airport-like security at the port, and the chilly late-autumn weather. Was it worth it? It was!

    Somehow, Lady Liberty brings out the funny side of people. While at the island, almost every other person seems to have their favorite pose in front of the statue. Some poses could give their counterparts in Pisa (Italy) a good run for their money. But nothing beats the "half-crazy" Korean tourist who took off his shirt in near-freezing temperature.

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    Ellis Island

    by mickeyboy07 Written Nov 18, 2011

    Ellis Island in New York harbour was the gateway for millions of immigrants to the United States.It was the nations busiest immigrant inpection station from 1892 to 1954.The Island was greatly expanded with landfill between 1892 and 1934.Before that the much smaller original island was the site of Fort Gibson and later a Naval Magazine.The Main building on the island is now a historic museum depicting the story of immigrant life in America in the early 1900's and tells the story of how modern America was shaped.The island lies North of Liberty island and the Liberty island ferry stops here on its way back to Manhattan.

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    Far from the maddening crowd

    by SOLODANCER Written Nov 17, 2011

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    Manhattan from the ferry to Governors Island

    I have one ideal retreat for you to escape to once you've had enough of New York City's deafening cacophony. It's Governors Island. A tiny deserted island less than half hour away from Manhattan and just across the even-tempered strait of the River Hudson. A quick ferry ride from the South Ferry landing where the other ferries heading to the other nearby Ellis Island, Liberty Island and Staten Island are also located. The best part of this ferry ride is that it's totally free depositing one to the island which likewise is open free all year round, not to mention a most scenic and magnificent views of lower Manhattan and all round.

    Governors Island is slowly being turned into a kind of artists' colony whereby the city of New York grants permits to selected artists that are generally less known and with less means financially. So one sees and then experiences creative atmosphere and happenings once in the island along with a welcomed open space and tremendous tranquility all round.

    Like all the other NYC islands that dot around Manhattan - close to 70 of them, inhabited and uninhabited - Governors Island had a mixed but historically colourful past. Before the pilgrims' arrival the island and everything else were the domain of the native indians which this island they had named Pagganuck (Nut Island) for its abundance of nut trees especially chestnut. In the 1600s, when the Dutch possessed Manhattan which they renamed New Amsterdam, it was a thriving fishing community. Then later it passed on to the British as we all know who wrested the region away from the Dutch and regained control of the island claiming for "the benefit and accommodation of his Majesty's governors". Thus, Governors Island. It's long history during subsequent occupations all the way to final American hands had always been of and along militarized outpost and installation because of its strategic location at the mouth of the river as it opens to sea. Its military use continued up til the 1960's.

    Governors Island is only open to the public for use and recreation during the day and left closed and deserted at night. Because the old barracks and gov't housing for the military are now all locked up (until the city gov't knows what to do of them), there is a certain errie desolateness and tranquil beauty to the place, the full expanse of the island to one's investigation and slow exploration. Among the modern amenities there for the visitor are a harbor side eatery, tourist information booth, art exhibition gallery, the artists' working space and a bicycle rental. But if you choose to spend the day here, it's far glorious to comb the island on foot taking in fantastic scenery and views of Manhattan and especially the statue of Liberty in the nearby distance.

    It certainly would make sense also for this tip to belong in the Off the Beaten Path section as this charming little island within this great metropolis is little known to many for now.

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    Statue of Liberty

    by mickeyboy07 Written Nov 16, 2011

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    View from the ferry
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    The Statue of Liberty is a colossal neoclassical sculpture located on Liberty Island in New York Harbour.It was designed by the French sculptor'Frederic Bartholdi'and dedicated on October 28th 1886.The statue,a gift to the United States from the people of France,is a robed female figure representing'Libertas',the Roman goddess of freedom,who bears a torch and 'Tabula Ansata'(a tablet evoking the law)upon which is inscribed the date of the American Declaration of Independance,July 4th 1776.A broken chain lies at her feet.The statue has become an icon of freedom and of the United States.
    The statue is an excact replica of a much smaller version which stands on the banks of the River Seine in Paris,another smaller version can be seen in Las Vegas.Millions of tourists flock to see the monument every year and the it was usually the first sight to see for so many immigrants who came to New York by boat in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
    Ferries to Liberty island run all day till dusk,check websites for times and prices.

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  • Sight Seeing

    by SeanFarr1 Written Oct 3, 2011

    A trip to New York without seeing the Staue of Liberty is incomplete. You ahve to go and see the majestic lady in the harbour. The size of the Statue of Liberty is only fully appreciated when you get close to her on the island. The location is amazing and the views back to Manhattan are also pretty incredible. ALso visit Ellis Island with all of its history and the building on the islands are incredibly beautiful. Maybe my favourite thing about going to see these sites though was the ferry trip to both islands. It offers the best views of downtown Manhattan.

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    Ellis Island Immigration Museum

    by t_cims Written Oct 1, 2011

    History of New York and all its personal, plus you can read about the people who emigrated to the U.S. from around the world and it was here they came by ferry the first time they came here. Very intresant and I really think you should take a trip there, by ferry from Manhattan.

    a must for us who have friends and family here in New York and for us who come from Europe.

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  • Statue of Liberty

    by Phalaenopsis03 Updated Sep 22, 2011

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    Gifted by France to the United States in 1886 in recognition of the friendship established during the American Revolution, the mighty 111 feet tall Lady Liberty is an American icon and a symbol of freedom.

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    Can't Forget The Statue of Liberty

    by galaxyrain Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    You really can't pass up seeing the Statue of Liberty. We almost did because the lines seemed so long and you can no longer climb up inside, but it was worth it. We went to Battery Park to get the tickets, which is right there on the bay where the ferry departs. Get there early. We got there around 9am and there was a long line. You can get passes to go in the statue of liberty at the base of the building, but you have to reserve the passes days in advance. If you go to the wbsite there is a list of the scheduling/prices. Remember this will take half a day to do. Allow at least 5 hours for this site. I think there is another ferry station in Jersey City too.
    Adult $12
    Child (4-12) $5
    Senior (62+) $10
    There is a cafe at Ellis Island and a snack bar on the ferries.
    You can also look up ancestors at the park.

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  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Statue of Liberty-Main Symbol of New York!

    by machomikemd Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Mimicking Lady Liberty
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    Located in New York, at 151 feet (46 meters) tall (305 feet including base and pedestal), the Statue of Liberty symbolizes freedom throughout the world. Its formal name is Liberty Enlightening the World. The Statue was actually a gift from the people of France.

    The statue, made of copper sheets with an iron framework, depicts a woman escaping the chains of tyranny, which lie at her feet. Her right hand holds aloft a burning torch that represents liberty. Her left hand holds a tablet inscribed with the date "July 4, 1776" (in Roman numerals), the day the United States declared its independence from England. She is wearing flowing robes and the seven rays of her spiked crown symbolize the seven seas and continents.

    It is a large statue that was presented to the United States by France in 1886. It stands at Liberty Island, New York in New York Harbor as a welcome to all visitors, immigrants, and returning Americans. The copper-clad statue, dedicated on October 28, 1886, commemorates the centennial of the United States and is a gesture of friendship from France to America. The sculptor was Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi, and Alexandre Gustave Eiffel, the designer of the Eiffel Tower, engineered the internal structure.

    Worldwide, the Statue of Liberty is one of the most recognizable icons of the United States,[and, more generally, represents liberty and escape from oppression. The Statue of Liberty was, from 1886 until the jet age, often one of the first glimpses of the United States for millions of immigrants after ocean voyages from Europe. Visually, the Statue of Liberty appears to draw inspiration from il Sancarlone or the Colossus of Rhodes.

    The statue is a central part of Statue of Liberty National Monument, administered by the National Park Service.

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    Statue of Liberty

    by PetraG Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Located on 12-acre Liberty Island in New York Harbor, the Statue of Liberty was a gift of international friendship from the people of France to the people of the United States and is one of the most universal symbols of political freedom and democracy. The Statue of Liberty was dedicated on October 28, 1886 and was designated a National Monument on October 15, 1924. The Statue was extensively restored in time for her spectacular centennial on July 4, 1986.
    You can buy tickets for the ferry transfere only (which includes Ellis Island) , but there are also tickets to go inside the Statue of Liberty and climb up to the observatory platform. But I have to warn you: these tickets have to be bought at least one week in advance.

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    Ellis Island Immigration Museum

    by eternel2002 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Ellis island
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    Ellis Island was one of the best places I visited in New York, this island was the major entry point to US during 20th century and almost 50% of all immigrants to United States passed thought it. It was interesting to know how was the immigration process at that time, from the waiting hall, the medical test room, the mental test room to the dormitory, I imagine how was terrible the conditions during all this process, and after all this you can get refused back to your country while you are in your dream land watching Manhatan in front of you! The museum contains also many pictures, letters and testimony of immigrants, some stuffs and materials that immigrants came with when they arrived to Ellis island, also it contains many information and statistics about the immigration flow in all over the world. Very interesting place.

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