Union Square - Gramercy, New York City

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  • Union Square Farmers Market, NYC, May 2010
    Union Square Farmers Market, NYC, May...
    by von.otter
  • Union Square Farmers Market, NYC, May 2010
    Union Square Farmers Market, NYC, May...
    by von.otter
  • Union Square Farmers Market, NYC, May 2010
    Union Square Farmers Market, NYC, May...
    by von.otter
  • Intellectual side of America..

    by mehbos37 Written Apr 8, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Union Square

    I enjoyed Union Square very much as it has a different atmosphere which you notice easily...

    There were demonstrations against the government and squirrels runnning under your feet..

    I am totally against Double -U team btw..
    I hate them as they refuse to sign Kyoto treaty and I hate them to play wise guy despite they know so little about the rest of the world..

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    Big Onion Walking Tours

    by ForestqueenNYC Updated Oct 3, 2005

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    Big Onion Walking Tours gives walking tours around New York.

    Here is a partial list of some of the tours, but it is better to click on the website.

    Immigrant New York
    The Upper West Side
    Historic Harlem
    Brooklyn Bridge & Heights
    SoHo & NoLiTa
    Greenwich Village
    Park Slope
    Central Park
    The East Village
    Revolutionary New York
    Times Square
    The Multi-Ethnic Eating Tour
    The Financial District
    Gramercy Park & Union Square
    The Jewish East Side
    Gangs of New York
    Halloween Weekend in Green-Wood Cemetery

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  • dejavu2gb's Profile Photo

    Union Square

    by dejavu2gb Updated Jan 20, 2006

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    Union Square
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    This garden square located at 14th Street and Broadway was one of New York City's first uptown business districts.
    By the 1960's it was a depressed part of town, and used to be the hangout spot for lots of junkies.
    Since then its been revived and not is home to the city's best known open air produce market, the Greenmarket. This market operates every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday mornings year round.
    During my visit to Union Square I was fortunate enough to experience a brief snowfall, which was absolutel gorgeous, you will see in some of my pictures the snow falling, it was really nice!

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    Union Square

    by MM212 Updated Oct 15, 2009

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    W Hotel at Union Square (Dec 06)
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    New York's liveliest square, Union Square is where much happens. The Square's central location in downtown New York and its proximity to New York University makes it a favourite hangout among the city's young generation, along with protesters and activists. An excellent farmer's market is set up every Saturday, Wednesday and Friday, and between Thanksgiving (end of Nov) and Christmas, an arts and crafts market with excellent gift choices is set up for holiday shoppers. Retailers and businesses present at Union Square include: Diesel, Puma, Barnes & Noble, Whole Foods Supermarket, and the W Hotel. Unfortunately, Virgin Megastore closed in 2009.

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    Union Square

    by PetraG Written Mar 7, 2006

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    George Washington at Union Square
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    In the early 1800s, upscale townhouses and local theatres thrived in the area surrounding Union Square. In the 1850s and 1860s, factories and offices replaced the residences, and unionists and abolitionists held massive rallies here. In the 1920s, labor activists gathered, protested and rioted. As recent as the late 1980s and early 1990s, urban decay tainted the square and its surrounding areas. But today, a lovely park is the centerpiece of a chic neighborhood brimming with restaurants, upscale shops and retail giants. Union Square is noted for its impressive equestrian statue of George Washington, created by Henry Kirke Brown and unveiled in 1856.
    The Union Square Greenmarket takes place here.

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  • acemj's Profile Photo

    Union Square

    by acemj Written Sep 2, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This area between Broadway and Park (14th-17th Sts.) is full of interesting architectural and mainly publishing and advertising companies. You'll also find some posh hotels, interesting shops and stylish residences. This photo shows the park that is literally Union Square, but the term refers to the whole area.

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    Union Square, The James Fountain

    by von.otter Written Mar 6, 2010

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    The James Fountain, Union Square, NYC, Feb. 2010
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    “Where there is charity and wisdom, there is neither fear nor ignorance.”
    — St. Francis of Assisi (1181-1226)

    Known as the Union Square Drinking Fountain, as well as the James Fountain, this public sculpture grouping, by German sculptor Karl Adolph Donndorf (1835-1916), was donated to the City of New York by philanthropist Daniel Willis James (1832-1907). James’ goal was to encourage the virtue of charity for 19th century New Yorkers. James visited the artist in Germany and was given a model of the fountain; he commissioned Donndorf to execute the piece shortly thereafter.

    The central figure is Charity represented by a mother holding a baby with a toddler at her side. Charity empties her jug of water, aided by the child. The artist used his own wife and children as models for the fountain’s figures. The granite that forms the base came from Sweden. No longer operational, lion’s heads, on the fountain’s four sides, once dispensed water; tin cups were originally attached at the fountain’s side that allowed the passing public to quench its thirst.

    Located in an alcove at street level on Union Square’s west side, the fountain was dedicated in October of 1881. A few moments after 3 o’clock in the afternoon, with a crowd of a thousand people, the new drinking fountain was unveiled, and at the conclusion of the ceremonies several hundred took the opportunity to drink from the fountain.

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    Union Square Farmers Market, Part I

    by von.otter Updated Mar 15, 2013

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    Union Square Farmers Market, NYC, May 2010
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    “A crust eaten in peace is better than a banquet partaken in anxiety.”
    —Aesop (620 BC-560 BC)

    Active since 1976, Union Square Greenmarket is one of the treasures of New York City. Located on the north, west and east sides of Union Square Park, the operates on Monday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday, between 8:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.

    At the height of the summer season, 140 farmers, fishermen, and bakers from New York State, New Jersey and Pennsylvania set up tables laden with fresh, locally grown fruits and vegetables, fish, meats and baked goods. These top-notch offerings are snapped up by an estimated 60,000 devoted New Yorkers, as well as by some of New York City’s top chefs, supporting local agriculture.

    Union Square Greenmarket is the Greenmarket program’s flagship operation. In other areas of Manhattan the City’s boroughs smaller farmers markets bring local goodness to a wide range of New Yorkers.

    Special cooking demonstrations are scheduled for the Union Square Greenmarket. Check the web site for a complete list of topics, days and times.

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    Union Square, Lincoln Monument Bronze

    by von.otter Updated Jan 7, 2009

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    Lincoln Monument Bronze, NYC, April 2008
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    “Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.”
    — Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) the opening to his Gettysburg Address

    A bronze of Abraham Lincoln stands at the northern end of Union Square. Sponsored by the Republican Union League Club three years after Lincoln’s assassination, the larger-than-life bronze was created by Henry Kirke Brown (1814-1886).

    This bronze of Lincoln was placed in the park in 1870. It stands in an axial alignment with the Independence Flagstaff and with the equestrian bronze of George Washington, at the opposite end of the park. It was cast at the R. Wood & Company Bronze Foundry in Philadelphia.

    When Lincoln ran for president he lost in New York State. By odd coincidence, Lincoln had to order the U.S. Army to put down the Draft Riots, which were held in Union Square.

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  • martin_nl's Profile Photo

    Union Square

    by martin_nl Written Apr 15, 2007

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    Farmer's Market
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    Union Square is young and bustling. There is lots to see and do here. New York has about 40 greenmarkets and one of the most poular is here on Union Sauqre. You can find things like home made cheese, organic vegetables, pumpkins around halloween time to curry leaves and anything seasonal.

    When the vt-gang was walking here we saw these little kids with their gran. They wanted to have a picture taken of themselves, but gran didn't have a camera with her. I offered to take a picture instead. Kids happy and gran happy. Even though the kids would never get a print of it, they were very happy that someone took their picture.

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  • maddcurlee's Profile Photo

    Union Square

    by maddcurlee Written Jun 7, 2007

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    I live two avenues(about 4 city blocks) from Union Square and have to say, it is always lively.
    The park is surrounded by many stores, NYU dorms, Park avenue, broadway, ect. Many people walk in the smal park, or lay in the grass. The park has been the meeting place for many, many protests in the city. It i s definietly a rest stop for those who have been shopping all day, those who have finished dinner and want to enjoy the scenery, or anyone who just wants to people-watch. Here is a list of evverything around the park(very close walking distance(2-10 min):

    1. Virgin Records Megastore(cafe, listening stations, music and film galore)
    (also seems to be a secret place to meet singles sinc many people tend to hang around for almost and hour)
    2. Union Square Movie Stadium (very comfortable seating and very popular theater)
    3. Whole Foods: gourmet shopping center where you can ordr food and eat it in the upstairs cafe also.
    4: Forever 21: two level clothing store for women. Sexy tops or flirty dresses to go out on the town in
    5. DSW: two floors of name brand shoes for cheaper prices for men and women
    6. Circuit City: electronics store
    7. Starbucks
    8. Barnes & Noble Bookstore: large, 4 floors, cafe on third floor
    9. Coffee Shop: diner with aspiring model and actors/actresses as wait staff, truns into a trendy bar at night with a line to get in
    10. Blue Water Grill: expensive seafood restaurant, don't wast your money here because there are way better restaurants in the city.
    11. Republic: heard the food is good here. But it's more of a singles bar and quick date place
    12. W Hotel bar: for the hip and upwardly mobile
    13. 5th Ave: shopping area within walking distance: you might not be able to stop yourself
    14. Broadway: walk South on Broadway and you will be busy for the rest of the day. There are so many lil shops, boutiques, cafes, etc. you won't realize how much time will go by.

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  • darthmilmo's Profile Photo

    Union Square

    by darthmilmo Written Oct 26, 2002

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    There are several subway lines that cross in the beautiful Union Square. Get off the subway and walk downtown towards NYU and Greenwich Village; or head uptown to the Empire State building, Madison square, and the Flat Iron Building. There are far too many options. For those that love markets, there is a good vegetable market with killer aromas in Union Square.

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    Union Square up to Gramercy Park

    by stmlnyc Written Oct 19, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Union Square Park

    One of my favorite areas has to be Union Square...the area has wonderful architecture with a youthful and vibrant feel. Visit the Barnes and Noble bookstore next to Union Square park, one of the prettiest designed bookstores.

    A walk up to Gramercy Park is rich in history. The classical architecture brings you back to old New York...see the Flatiron Building and the society buildings near Gramercy Park.

    Although Madison Square Park can get a bit wild with its resident homeless, the park is lovely, especially during the spring and summer. Notice the statue of William Seward, Secretary of State responsible for buying Alaska; the body was actually that of Abraham Lincoln.

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    Union Square: Lafayette Bronze

    by von.otter Updated Mar 17, 2012

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    Bronze Sculpture, Marquis de Lafayette, 03/08
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    “In remembrance of sympathy in times of trial.”
    — The inscription that is chiseled into the granite pedestal

    This bronze 1873 bronze sculpture of Marie-Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette, who was born in 1757 at Auvergne, France, and died in Paris, France, 1834. Lafayette is looking east away from the park. He stands on a ship’s prow in the act of pledging his heart and sword to the American revolutionaries.

    Cast in 1873 and dedicated in 1876, this work by Frederic Auguste Bartholdi, who also made the Statue of Liberty, was a gift from the French government to express its appreciation for aid that New York City gave Paris during the 1870-1871 Franco-Prussian War. The granite pedestal was designed by H.W. DeStuckle and paid for by French citizens living in New York City.

    The Marquis de Lafayette was 18 when he heard tell of the American Revolution. Lafayette, a captain of artillery in a regiment in Metz, met the Duke of Gloucester, the brother of King George III at a dinner. Lafayette was fascinated by the Duke’s stories of the events in America and its Declaration of Independence. Lafayette was granted a commission as an American officer, and at the age of 20 he joined the American ranks as a major general.

    Lafayette served on Washington’s staff, became Washington’s friend and a trusted field officer. He proved himself on the battlefield in New Jersey and Pennsylvania in 1778. In 1779 he returned to his native land to secure France’s support for the American cause. When he returned to America he helped to lay the trap for Cornwallis at Yorktown.

    In 1824, Lafayette made a triumphant return to the United States, where he was celebrated on a tour around the country. As payment for his services in the Revolutionary War, Congress granted him $200,000, and a township of 24,000 acres in Louisiana. When he returned to France, he took with him a plot of American soil, within which he was buried in 1834.

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    Union Square, the Gandhi Memorial

    by von.otter Updated May 16, 2010

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    Gandhi Memorial, Union Square, May 2010
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    “A nation’s culture resides in the hearts and in the soul of its people.”
    — Mohandas Gandhi (1869-1948)

    In the southwest corner of Union Square, a bronze sculpture of Mohandas Gandhi strides through its own little park; it was sculpted by Kantilal B. Patel.

    The memorial was dedication on 2.October.1986, the 117th anniversary of Gandhi’s birth. Bayard Rustin (1912–1987), a civil rights leader, was the keynote speaker at the dedication. Union Square was chosen because of its historic tradition of peaceful protest associated with the park. The Gandhi Memorial International Foundation spearheaded the monument’s creation and placement; it was paid for by Mohan B. Murjani of Murjani International, Ltd.

    Gandhi, the champion of nonviolent protest and Indian independence, is shown with a staff in his right hand, looking forward, while walking. Wearing sandals and a cotton dhoti, illustrating Gandhi’s Hindu asceticism, as well as his support for India’s native industries.

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