Beaufort Favorites

  • Historic House on Front Street
    Historic House on Front Street
    by grandmaR
  • Historic sign outside the Old Burying Ground
    Historic sign outside the Old Burying...
    by grandmaR
  • The Greydon Paul Drawbridge
    The Greydon Paul Drawbridge
    by grandmaR

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    The Old Burying Ground

    by grandmaR Updated May 8, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Historic sign outside the Old Burying Ground

    Favorite thing: The Old Burying Ground grew up around the building used for sessions of the Court and for reading the service of the Anglican Church in St. John's Parish. The earliest graves which are in the northwest corner would have been marked by cedar slabs or shells due to lack of indigenous stone. (And since there was no access to Beaufort except by boat, bringing grave stones in would probably not have been high priority.) These are vaulted graves bricked over to protect them from water and wild animals.

    Some of the people buried here are:
    1 Capt. Josiah Pender. Seized Ft. Macon before NC seceded from the Union in1861.
    3 Josiah Davis, MD. Practiced medicine in the Apothecary Shop now in the Historic Site
    4 Vienna Dill. The child died of yellow fever and was buried in a glass top case.
    5 Samuel Leffers. Schoolmaster who owned the Leffer's house on the Site.
    6 Pierre Henry. An African American who taught emancipated slaves at the Washburn Academy.
    7 Rev. Arendell. One of 6 of the Ann St. Methodist Ch. ministers buried here.
    8 Josiah Bell. Lived on Turner Street in the yellow house that is now part of the Historic Grounds
    9 Nathan Fouller. Believed to be a direct descendant of the Mayflower pilgrims. Died 1800.
    10 Capt. John Sabiston. Died near Charleston and was brought home by his crew.
    14 Sgt. George Johnson. A member of the U.S. Colored Infantry who fought in the Civil War.
    15 Sarah Gibbs and Jacob Shepard. He was lost at sea and she remarried. He returned, they agreed that she stay with her 2nd husband but be buried with her 1st.
    18 Col. William Tohmson. The highest ranking officer from Beaufort who served in the Revolutionary War.
    19 British Officer. Died on ship in Beaufort harbor. He was buried standing up "in rebel's ground".
    20 "Crissie Wright" Common Grave. The sailors who froze to death in the shipwreck are buried here.
    27 Capt James Manney. Joined the secessionist militia takeover of Ft. Macon in 1861. Eventually fought with Lee's army at Petersburg. Va.

    Fondest memory: The sign says:

    C (insignia) 43
    OLD BURYING GROUND
    _______________


    Deeded to town, 1731, by Captain Otway Burns of the War of 1812, Revolutionary and Civil War soldiers are buried here.

    In case you wanted to know Otway Burns (c.1775–1850) was an American privateer, b. Onslow co., N.C. At the outbreak of the War of 1812, he outfitted the Baltimore clipper Snap-Dragon as a privateer and began one of the most spectacular privateering careers in American history. He destroyed and captured millions of dollars worth of British shipping and had a $50,000 price set on his head by the British. After the war Burns turned to shipbuilding and later served (1821–35) in the North Carolina legislature. A captured cannon is on his grave.

    The Beaufort Historical Association gives tours June to Spet on Tues, Weds, Thurs at 2:30 pm $5 adults $3 children. Self guided brochurers available.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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    Beaufort Channel Bridge

    by grandmaR Updated May 8, 2005

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    The Greydon Paul Drawbridge

    Favorite thing: The Coast Guard calls this the Beaufort Channel. I know it as the Gallant Channel bridge.

    In April of 2001, the Coast Guard wrote:
    "The Graydon Paul Bridge is the connecting bridge between Beaufort and Morehead City, North Carolina on US 70. This is the only corridor into Beaufort without making a 3 hour commute around Carteret County. Eleven to twelve thousand vehicles pass over the bridge everyday. One mile south of the Greydon Paul Bridge on US 70 is the Morehead City US 70 Bridge, which is a fixed 65 ft vertical clearance bridge over the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AICWW). It is a short waterway commute for boaters to go around through the AICWW by Morehead City back to Beaufort. Motorists do not have an alternate route traveling to and from Beaufort to Morehead City. When bridge lifts occur, traffic backs
    up periodically for six to seven miles. The current schedule of openings every twenty minutes does not allow the traffic congestion to clear the bridge before the next opening. During rush hour periods the situation is even further impacted due to peak traffic numbers of vehicles trying to cross the bridge. NCDOT proposes that by restricting openings to twice an hour and lengthening rush hour restrictions for peak traffic times on the bridge, vehicular traffic congestion on US Highway 70 will be reduced and highway safety will be increased.

    They added that for vessels it added 35-40 minutes in transit time to vessels to go around. I think that is a somewhat short estimate - I'm pretty sure it would take us longer than that to go from Town Creek back out the channel and down the ICW.

    Fondest memory: When we were here in the fall of 2000, the regulation at 33 CFR 117.822 requires the bridge to open on signal except that from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m., the draw shall open on signal for all vessels waiting to pass every hour on the hour, twenty minutes past the hour and forty minutes past the hour; except that on weekdays the bridge need not open at 7:40 a.m., 8:40 a.m., 4:40 p.m. and 5:40 p.m. From 10 p.m. to 6 a.m., the bridge shall open on signal.

    So my memory is of calling this bridge at about 0700 and finding out that if we did not get through it by 7020, it would not open again until 0800. We really scrambled to pull the anchor and get ready for the 0720 opening.

    Related to:
    • Business Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Sailing and Boating

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    BOW-Fort

    by grandmaR Updated May 8, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Historic House on Front Street

    Favorite thing: My tip is that the town's name is pronounced BO fort (like a hair bow or a girls beau). The one in South Carolina is pronounced Beuw as in beautiful.

    So in North Carolina, you pull back a BOW to shoot an arrow at the Fort, and in South Carolina it is BEAUTIFUL Beaufort.

    Fondest memory: Looking at the old homes in the historic district.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Beaches
    • Sailing and Boating

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