New Bern Favorites

  • Court House
    Court House
    by grandmaR
  • Photo of a house from the movie
    Photo of a house from the movie
    by grandmaR
  • First Presbyterian Church
    First Presbyterian Church
    by grandmaR

Most Recent Favorites in New Bern

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    Downtown Historic District

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 16, 2014

    Favorite thing: The Downtown Historic District is a 56 square block area, along the banks of the Trent and Neuse Rivers, which contains a collection of buildings and landscape elements that chronicle the development of New Bern from the time when it was the capital of the new colony (1766 to 1778), to the early 20th century fueled by a thriving lumber industry

    One of the buildings in the area is the Courthouse, The courthouse is among North Carolina's finest examples of the Second Empire style. The Craven County Courthouse was constructed in the 1880s and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    The New Bern Fireman’s Museum is one of the oldest of its type in the country. The Museum opened its doors in 1955; some of its artifacts date back 100 years earlier! The origins of the New Bern Fire Department began with the Atlantic Hook and Ladder Company in 1845, the first fire company chartered in North Carolina and one of the first in the nation.

    Court House Fire Tower Fire Station Downtown historic district Entering the historic district
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Road Trip

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    Churches

    by grandmaR Written Apr 25, 2009

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    Favorite thing: New Bern has many historic churches. The first photo is of Christ Episcopal Church at 320 Pollock St. The churchyard stretches to either side of the main sanctuary. In the eighteenth century it served as a burial ground. In the aftermath of several yellow fever epidemics, the churchyard had filled with graves and was closed by 1799.

    The second photo is of First Presbyterian Church which is New England-like in style and rises in four steps. The cornerstone for the church was laid in 1819 and church building was dedicated in 1822.

    The third and fourth photos are of the Old Methodist Parsonage which is near the New Bern Academy. The last photo is the historic sign about Christ Episcopal Church.

    Christ Episcopal Church First Presbyterian Church Old Methodist Parsonage Old Methodist Parsonage Christ Church historic sign
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel

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    Historic Signs

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 24, 2009

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    Favorite thing: In addition to the main New Bern historic buildings like the Tryon Palace, New Bern has a full compliment of historic signs about events in New Bern.

    The first sign is about the Battle of New Bern, where, according to the sign, "The victory of Union General Ambrose Burnside here on March 14, 1862 caused the fall of New Bern"

    The signs by the drawbridge (photo 4) inform us about the DILIGENCE which was one of the first ten United States Revenue Cutters which temporarily sailed out of New Bern in 1791 prior to moving to her permanent homeport of Wilmington in October of 1792.

    The second sign is about the U.S.C.G. Cutter Pamlico which was designed to cruise in inland waters and therefore had an extremely shallow draft. The Pamlico proceeded to her permanent station at New Bern, North Carolina, arriving there on 4 November 1907 and remained there until 1947 when she was decommissioned.

    The second sign is one of the "Washington Slept Here" signs - it states that Washington visited the Stanly home for two nights on his southern tour April 20-21, 1791. This is about the same time that the Diligence was in New Bern.

    Fondest memory: The third and fifth photo are about notable New Bern citizens. Number three says: James Walker Hood ----Asst. Superintendent Public Instruction 1868-70: a founder Livingston College 1885; Bishop A.M.E. Zion Church: founded St. Peters, 1864. One blk N.

    The last sign says: Graham A Barden (1896-1967) --- Congressman, 1935-61. Secured military bases for eastern N.C: advocated Taft Hartley labor relations act. Grave 4 blocks northwest.

    Sign about the Battle of New Bern Washington's Tour Signs by the drawbridge Graham A. Barden sign
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Budget Travel

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    Riverside

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 24, 2009

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    Favorite thing: We had friends who had their sailboat in New Bern on the Trent River. The Trent River begins as a stream about 15 miles south of Kinston, NC and ends in New Bern, NC where it joins with the Neuse River at Union Point. Our friends' problem was that the river was too shoally to sail much, and they had to go all the way down the Neuse to get sailing room.

    Apparently during hurricanes, the Trent floods the town, so New Bern (like Belhaven) has raised the houses near the river (photo 3)

    Fondest memory: When we set out to go to New Bern. I thought about taking the free NC ferry across the Neuse River, but Bob said "No more ferries". We crossed the drawbridge (photos 1 and 5) over the Trent River and got to New Bern about 11.

    Approaching the Trent River drawbridge Fixed bridges coming into town Raised houses Bridges Trent River drawbridge
    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Road Trip
    • Beaches

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    Gardens

    by grandmaR Updated Mar 7, 2008

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    Favorite thing: There are many gardens in the Tryon Palace area, many of them carefully restored to something that would look familiar to th Victorians. The website had a list of flowers that would be in bloom at the time of year when you visit.

    We saw the kitchen garden (photo 2) This garden, located behind the Kitchen Office, offers a variety of produce almost year-round. Eighteenth-century varieties of vegetables, herbs, and fruit trees make the kitchen garden one of the most popular of our outdoor sites.

    We also walked by the Stoney flower garden (photos 1 and 3) on our way back from lunch, It is located on Pollock Street. It is just beyond the Carraway Garden: the Stoney Garden is surrounded by a white picket fence. It features old-fashioned perennials and antique roses of varieties known to have graced New Bern gardens in the 19th century. The garden was constructed in the late 1990s with funding provided by the family of Mary Kistler Stoney, a member of the original Tryon Palace Commission.

    Photo 4 is one of the pictures I took at the Stanly house. In 1967, the year after Stanly house was moved to its present location, a formal “Town Garden” of brick walks edged with boxwood was created. While the overall design suggests an 18th-century garden, plantings close to the foundation of the house were not typical of that era.

    Fondest memory: Unfortunately, not many flowers other than daffodils, hyacinth, pansies, violas, snowdrops and camellias were in bloom at the time of year that we were there (early March). The big wide flower beds in front of the palace had all been dug up and were just bare earth waiting for someone to plant something in them.

    Also, when we first drove in they were taking down and cutting up a huge tree (photo 5) and that blocked the normal way to get to the visitor's center. Bob said he didn't see that anything was wrong with the tree.

    Mary Kistler Stoney garden Gardens behind the palace from the kitchen Sign on Stoney garden Stanly Garden Huge tree blocking the road
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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    Visitor's Centers

    by grandmaR Updated Mar 7, 2008

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    Favorite thing: There are actually two visitors centers in New Bern. One is for the Craven County Convention & Visitors Center which is located Inside the New Bern Convention Center on 203 South Front Street | New Bern, North Carolina 28563 (800) 437-5767

    This is the one we went to first. It is right down on the river. This is where I got pamphlets and maps of the town and also recommendations for lunch.

    Fondest memory: The other one is the one for the Tryon Palace Historic Sites & Gardens. Everything here is on the hour and half hour. There is a 20 minute film, there are tours of the George W. Dixon and the John Wright Stanley Houses (the tour starts from the Visitor's Center - a docent takes you), and the tours of the Palace also start on the hour and half hour.

    We were too late to see the film - it was ending. So we bought our tickets ($15 each) and walked over to do the noon palace tour. They told us no pictures allowed inside. When we went back we saw the movie (photo 2 and 5) and they also have a model of the various properties (photos 3 and 4).

    Entrance to the Convention Center Scene from the movie Model of the town View of the palace Photo of a house from the movie
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

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