Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge Travel Guide

  • Things to Do
    by grandmaR
  • Information sign
    Information sign
    by grandmaR
  • Sign in the visitor's center
    Sign in the visitor's center
    by grandmaR

Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge Things to Do

  • Fishing

    I saw alot of people fishing along the islands but not off the beaches. I am sure you need a license.

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  • Inland side of the Street

    The vegitation ranges from salt marshes, to dunes. I suspect this is what the dunes looked like for millenia.

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  • Beach marker 127

    On my return trip north I was on the ocean side of the road and stopped at this beach. There are a number of beaches all along the islands, but on Pea Island I believe you are only allowed to enter where there is a number.

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  • Where can you go and what can you see?

    Pea Island is one of the best locations within the United States! Birds can be seen in the many salt flats, freshwater lagoons, and in the numerous marshes located in the refuge. The refuge was established in 1938. Stop by the Refuge Visitor Center, located on the east side of North Pond, for interprestive exhibits and brochures.

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  • Snow Geese!

    I do not know if they nested here over the winter or just resting during their migration north. I saw several flocks at the north end of the island. Besides snow geese, I saw black and white pelicans, several varieties of ducks, and egrets while driving down Pea Island. There was no particular spot, just kept my eyes open.

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  • North Pond Wildlife Trail

    North Pond Wildlife Trail is a half-mile trail which offers spectacular wildlife observation any season.The best birding is during the fall and winter. The trail is located near the Visitor Center. Most visitors walk this trail to the end - a double-level tower - and then retrace their steps to the Visitor Center and their vehicles. It is possible...

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Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge Transportation

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo
    Bonner Bridge through the windshield 1 more image

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    According to NCDOT, this bridge is deteriorating severely. When the 2.4-mile span linking the northern Outer Banks and Hatteras Island was opened to traffic in 1963, its life span was not intended to reach beyond the next century. In a 1993 report, engineers estimated that the bridge had about six more years of life left.

    The 2.5- mile bridge spans one of the most dynamic marine environments in the world. Other challenging issues involved the busy navigational channel within a national wildlife refuge, a fragile marine habitat and a popular national recreational area.

    The link below is to an aerial photo of the bridge.

    You also need to be aware that the road is bordered by shifting sand (photo 2) which may not provide a solid surface for a car.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • National/State Park
    • Beaches

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Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge Local Customs

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    Informational Sign 4 more images

    by grandmaR Written May 6, 2005

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    This sign says:

    "This dike system, along with the dunes, was constructed in the late 1930s and early 1940s by the Civilian Conservation Corps. Wax myrtles and live oaks help to stabilize the system and provide excellent songbird habitat. Many species, including the yellow-rumped warbler, common yellowthroat, northern cardinal, rufous-sided towhee, and seaside sparror are observed here during spring and fall migrations."

    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • National/State Park
    • Birdwatching

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Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge Warnings and Dangers

  • lonestar_philomath's Profile Photo

    by lonestar_philomath Written Mar 1, 2007

    These species are found from internal waters of the island to 3 miles out to sea. There is a limit to how much can be collected. The list includes: Blue Crab, Hard Clam, Eastern Oyster, Bay Scallop, Conches & Whilks, Mussels, and Shrimp.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Eco-Tourism

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Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge Sports & Outdoors

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    Rod holders for a car

    by grandmaR Written May 5, 2005

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    Only the use of pole and line, rod and reel, or cast net is permitted in the Pea Island Refuge. But all along the Outer Banks, surf fishing is big.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Beaches
    • Fishing

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Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge Favorites

  • Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station

    Nice facilities. When I was there, a car pulled up to the gate with two coast guard men. They spoke into the box at the gate entrance and where allowed entry to fish off the pier! Now I wish I had joined!

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  • Fish Identification

    Beside the coast guard station on Pea Island there is a fisherman's dock where people can rent boats and a general store. There are also displays of fish that can be caught in the waters of the islands.

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  • Charles Kuralt Memorial

    You see signs about Charles Kuralt in various places such as the wildlife refuges and the Dismal Swamp Canal Visitor's Center. The Charles Kuralt Trail has been established to help people enjoy these wildlands and to recognize the broadcast journalist who shared the delights and wonders of out-of-the-way places like the dark backwater rivers that...

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