Pinnacle Travel Guide

  • Fall at Pilot Mountain (before the recent fires)
    Fall at Pilot Mountain (before the...
    by etfromnc

Pinnacle Things to Do

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    Fall at Pilot Mountain (before the recent fires)

    by etfromnc Written Dec 26, 2012

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    Yes, there is a town of Pilot Mountain but the mountain after which it is named is actually in the little, but lovely, village of Pinnacle.
    Approaching from virtually any direction in Forsythe, Stokes, or Surry county, you will see Pilot Mountain long before you get there, not because it is so high but because the surrounding area is relatively flat. At just over 1,400 feet above the rolling countryside of the upper Piedmont plateau. Dedicated as a National Natural Landmark in 1976, this solitary peak is the centerpiece of Pilot Mountain State Park.
    Fun, from relaxation to exhilaration, is easy to find here. Treat yourself to a horseback ride through the woods or challenge the river from raft or canoe. A seven-mile woodland corridor joins two sections of the park, with each section offering a wealth of opportunities for outdoor fun. The mountain segment, which includes the two pinnacles, contains most of the visitor facilities. The more primitive river section centers around the lazy, meandering Yadkin River.

    There has been a major fire as well as river flooding within the park during 2012 which have resulted in closing trails and other public access areas so please call ahead before making plans to visit Pilot Mountain State Park.

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    • Hiking and Walking

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    by etfromnc Updated Nov 18, 2008

    When I discovered the existence of the Horne Creek Living Historical Farm, I really got excited. I never officially lived on a farm but my grandparents did and I spent a lot of my first five years with them as well as major portions of most of my summer breaks from school with them. Horne Creek farm reminds me very much of my grandparents' farm. The two are only about ten miles apart in the gently rolling foothills of the beautiful Blue Ridge mountains in Surry County. Horne Creek Farm is an outdoor museum and research center reflecting the agrarian tradition of northwestern North Carolina of approximately 100 years ago. Guides dressed in early 20th century costumes (not significantly different from the clothes I remember my grandparents, aunts, and uncles wearing over 50 years later) are available for questions and to show you around.
    Again like my grandparents' farm, there is a creek (Would you believe Horne Creek?) running through Horne Creek Farm which downstream joins the Yadkin River in southeastern Surry County.
    Horne Creek Farm was several times the size of my grandparents' farm and they raised a wider variety of crops than our family did, but both produced fruits, corn, other vegetables (primarily for family consumption), assorted grains, and increasingly commercially important tobacco. It is also difficult to imagine an early-20th century farm without animals. Often, they would have mules, or even horses, for transportation and other forms of labor, and cows, pigs, sheep, goats, chickens, ducks, and/or guinea fowl for food.
    Today, I am often chagrined by people who insist on "leaving work at the office," "leaving spirituality and religion for church," or otherwise definitively compartmentalizing their lives. It was easier in that environment to understand, but no less true than today, that every second of our lives is intricately related to every other moment in some way. Farming, a century ago, was an all-consuming way of life and, perhaps because so many of them shared the same occupation, farm communities had a strong tendency to be more close-knit than even rural communities are today.
    At Horne Creek Living History Farm, you can observe all of these aspects of early-20th century farming from plowing to plowing for the next season.
    Quiz Time: Looking for farmers, who knows what suckering and topping are as related to farming?

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