Safety Tips in North Carolina

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Most Viewed Warnings and Dangers in North Carolina

  • ant1606's Profile Photo

    Don't step on these creatures!

    by ant1606 Updated Feb 26, 2010

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    Expect encounters on trails in the wilderness, such as the cute millipede. Watch your steps to avoid unintentional killings! Every living thing has a function in the ecosystem and deserves to live. Respect the environment and enjoy the sight and behavior of these creatures!

    Centipede Centipede Trail in the Great Smoky Mountains NP
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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    GET FAT HERE

    by DAO Written May 13, 2008

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    In The 1970’s someone invented the Drive-Thru for fast food restaurants. This meant that suddenly millions of Americans were liberated from the need to walk when getting huge bags of unhealthy food. Yep, exercise was cut right down to make it easier. Now you can see (and I have pictures) lots of cars in a huge line belching toxic fumes into the environment because EVERYONE wants to go through the Drive-Thru! Me? I park and, get this, walk inside the whole 20-40 feet and what do I find? I get served right away and have any table I want usually.

    America has an obesity problem. Drive-Thrus? Deadly.

    (All pictures taken here in North Carolina)

    Related to:
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    • Beer Tasting
    • Food and Dining

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    Driving the Blue Ridge Parkway

    by toonsarah Written Apr 1, 2007

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    Please don’t think you can cover the 469 miles of the Blue Ridge Parkway in a day! This isn’t a highway but a rural road, albeit a well-maintained and very well-known one. You need to be aware of tight, spiralling curves – these help make the Parkway special, but can catch an unobservant motorist (or motorcyclist) off guard. There are also 26 tunnels to look out for. There are posted speed limits, which vary according to the nature of that specific stretch of road (i.e. slower at bends) and you’ll need to drive especially slowly during rainy or foggy conditions, and watch out for wildlife. Also, as this is such a popular destination, you should be aware that it’s travelled by many RVs which can’t manoeuvre very easily on this twisting road so you may have to be patient – and if you’re driving an RV do show consideration for others and pull over to let them past when it’s safe to do so.

    View from the Blue Ridge Parkway, NC
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
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    Blue Ridge Parkway Driving

    by Florida999 Written May 19, 2006

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    This road sometimes gets so foggy that you cannot see 5 feet in front of your vehicle. It took us hours one time to get from one town to the next.
    If you are not sightseeing, or going to a specific trail on the Parkway, I would drive on a regular road if you plan on getting anywhere fast.

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    Road Hazards on Blue Ridge Parkway

    by KiKitC Updated Aug 21, 2005

    The speed limit on the Parkway is 45 MPH. Though, due to traffic and endless views, you may not reach this speed, be aware of numerous road hazards:

    1. If it's raining or foggy, visibility is down and the road may be slick. The road twists and turns as it goes up and down the mountians.

    2. Wildlife may wander onto the road. Be careful going around sharp turns.

    If you aren't comfortable with such winding roads, there are areas that a car can pull off the road to observe views, hike trails, or just let others cars go by.

    New
    Related to:
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    • National/State Park
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    Mountain Roads

    by grandmaR Written May 8, 2005

    I knew about switchback roads from visiting Colorado as a child. I didn't expect to find the same thing in NC because I really had not been to the mountains prior to the trip my husband and I made on our honeymoon in 1959, which is when I took this picture.

    The mountain area of NC is called God's Country by some. The main area of interest is roughly bordered by I-26 on the east, S.C. 11 to the south, U.S. 441 to the east and U.S. 74 to the north.

    One of the main roads here is the Blue Ridge Parkway which runs along the Pisgah Ridge, passing close to some of the some of the highest peaks in the eastern U.S. Near Richland Balsam the Parkway reaches its maximum elevation of 6,053 feet. N.C. 215 and U.S. 276 both traverse the Pisgah Ridge through passes, as do U.S. 23/74 and U.S. 19 further north (not shown). U.S. 276 is the only road that ascends both the Pisgah Ridge and the Blue Ridge Escarpment.

    The road is smooth, twisty, and free from any commercial distractions. To get gas, eats, or accommodation you have to come down off the Parkway into small towns far below. These exit mountain roads are also switch-back experiencesThe Parkways averages 20 turns per mile- talking about blind turns with decent drops on either side. The speed limit is 45 mph

    Switchbacks in the Blue Ridge
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    Photographs Not Allowed

    by grandmaR Updated May 7, 2005

    The Tryon Palace in New Bern does not allow photographs of the interior. The reasons they give for this are variable - one person said it was because of insurance requirements. I think the real reason is probably that they want to avoid flash pictures which can degrade the antique fabrics and they can't rely on photographers not to use flash. I can understand that.

    But another person said that there was a North Carolina law against photography inside of historic buildings. I have been completely unable to find such a law, and in any case, the Tryon Palace is NOT a historic building, it is only a reconstruction.

    Since they made it clear up front that there were to be no pictures inside the Tryon Palace, I did not take pictures there, or in any of the actual historic homes, but I did take some in the reconstructed kitchen.

    Reconstucted kitchen of the Tryon Palace
    Related to:
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    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Hurricanes

    by grandmaR Updated May 6, 2005

    When you visit establishments along the coasts and sounds of North Carolina, you may find records like this of the high water levels that happened during hurricanes. This doorpost is in a restaurant in Belhaven (The Helmsman). This whole town has gotten FEMA money to raise the houses and buildings up above the flood level. This is because they had flooding three out of four years between 1996 and 1999.

    The highest level is Floyd 9/99, and then below that are Fran 9/96, Bertha 7/96, Dennis 9/99, Bonnie 9/98 and Isabel 9/03.

    Hurricane Floyd (1999) brought intense rains and record flooding to the Eastern U.S. Of the 56 people who perished, 50 drowned due to inland flooding.

    Hurricane levels recorded
    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Road Trip
    • Adventure Travel

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    Security at Raleigh-Durham airport

    by b1bob Updated Jan 12, 2005

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    I don't know if it's a common thing or if I was just unlucky on the morning of 18 December 2001, but my security agent was as dumb as a bag of hammers. He concentrated more on the size of the bag rather than its contents. I outsmarted him by just pushing my bag through the machine and moving on. It's not really a danger, but be prepared for security agents at RDU with either low IQs, no common sense, or both.

    Raleigh-Durham Airport security

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    Hurricanes

    by Astrobuck Updated Jan 10, 2005

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    Growing up in coastal North Carolina, I had the privledge (or curse) of riding out 4 hurricanes. My suggestion is, do not do it. If you are on vacation here and you hear a hurricane watch or warning, please heed it wholeheartedly. The damage done by these storms can be catastrophic. I was in Hurricane Fran in 1996, and it was by far the worst experience I have ever had in my entire life. The picture you see here was taken after Fran. You can see the fishing pier split in two and debris all over the beach. Also take note of the erosion along the jettys. If you look closely to the left of the front jetty, you can see the erosion from the storm surge (water level at the time of the storm). More than half of the dunes are gone.

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Road Trip
    • Budget Travel

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  • winter travel and ice storms!

    by MandaJ320 Written Jan 5, 2005

    people down south don't really know how to handle winter weather because it only happens a few times every year, but when it does happen, watch out. NC gets a lot of ice storms, and the power goes out for days, and drivers who aren't experienced driving in hazardous conditions are out on the roads causing wrecks. please be careful!

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    Jellyfish & Portuguese Man-Of-War

    by Astrobuck Updated Nov 22, 2004

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    OK, if you are allergic to bee stings, you do not want to get stung by one of these. Between the two, the Portuguese Man-Of-War is by far the worst. They are most noticable by their bright blue ballon-like body. The tentacles are very long. You can be swimming in the surf and get stung by a Portuguese Man-Of-War without it touching you, because the tentacles can break off and float elsewhere. The regular "cabbage head" jellyfish are less dangerous, but the stings are still painful. See the General Tips on how to treat a jellyfish sting.

    Portuguese Man-Of-War
    Related to:
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    • Beaches
    • Singles

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  • Astrobuck's Profile Photo

    Rip Currents

    by Astrobuck Written Oct 5, 2004

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    Rip currents are very common along the North Carolina coast. A rip current is a current created from the ocean cutting a narrow channel through a sand bar. The force of the water going through this channel is tremendous, but weakens as it goes out. If you feel yourself being pulled out to sea, follow these directions:

    First, drift with the current. Look toward shore to see which way you are moving. NEVER I repeat, NEVER SWIM AGAINST THE CURRENT!!! THIS IS HOW AND WHY PEOPLE DROWN!!! People tire from this, so don't do it.

    Second, swim in the direction the water is moving, and swim diagonally toward the shore. You will be out in no time.

    Third, when in doubt, always swim near a lifeguard.

    Rip Current Illustration
    Related to:
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    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Singles

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  • Astrobuck's Profile Photo

    Durham

    by Astrobuck Updated Sep 7, 2004

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    Highest crime rate in the nation per capita. I was a police officer here for 6 years and know the ins and outs of Durham. 150 known gangs and over 350 known gang members as of 2003. It has probably gone up since then. Crime is out of control, and is very widespread. If you go, go to Duke University, then Southpointe Mall, spend the day there, and leave. There is nothing else in Durham, really, except the Durham Bulls Baseball Team (A must see)! I knew of about 5 to 6 armed robberies a night, even on the GOOD side of town! If you go, don't go anywhere at night.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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  • tpangelinan's Profile Photo

    Be careful

    by tpangelinan Updated Nov 28, 2003

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    Be very careful of the undertow, it can sneak up on you and take you down the beach a stretch. Don't panic just swim even with the shore until you come out of it. Don't try to swim againt it, you will tier out quick. There are life guards on duty during the season.

    Careful of undertow
    Related to:
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    • Water Sports
    • Family Travel

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