Fun things to do in North Dakota

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Most Viewed Things to Do in North Dakota

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    Turtle River State Park

    by Basaic Written Mar 19, 2012

    Near Grand Forks in the Northeastern corner of the state is a pretty little park called Turtle River State Park. The 784 acre park was built in the 1930s by the Civilian Conservation Corps and offers a variety of activities including: Camping, fishing, hiking, picnic sites, wildlife watching, and a playground for the kids. A nice place to escape the city life of Grand Forks.

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    Fort Ransom State Historic Site

    by Basaic Written Mar 19, 2012

    Fort Ransom was built on 18 June 1867 to protect railroad workers building the railroad line between Fargo and Bismarck and to protect area settlers. The fort was one of a series of forts into the newly opening west, and had substantial log buildings that housed 200 enlisted men and 7 officers. The fort was named after General Thomas E. G. Ransom of the 11th Illinois Volunteers. Locals called this area Grizzly Bear Hill. Eight years later the post was dismantled and moved to Fort Seward at Jamestown to protect a higher priority site for the railroad. Today you can tour the site where Fort Ransom served for those 8 years, just outside the town.

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    Elkhorn Ranch Unit

    by Basaic Written Mar 19, 2012

    I thought about driving out to the Elkhorn Ranch Site until I talked to one of the rangers. He said there is really not much to see there; just a few remains of the foundation. The road out there is also long and very rough. The road conditions were even worse than normal because they had a lot of rain recently. The Elkhorn Ranch is only for those of you with a good truck with a high clearance who really want to see it. Otherwise save more time for the two main parts of the park.

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    Theodore Roosevelt National Park - North Unit

    by Basaic Written Mar 19, 2012

    The north unit is about 50 miles north of the south unit. I took the 14 mile scenic drive. This is one way and you take the same route back. There are a number of stops along the way most with interpretive signs to highlight important aspects of the area. There are also a number of hiking trails ranging from short trails with interpretive signs to longer trails like the 17.7 mile Achenbach Trail. You can also access the 96 mile Maah Daah Hey Trail here.

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    Theodore Roosevelt National Park - South Unit

    by Basaic Written Mar 19, 2012

    The Theodore Roosevelt National Park is divided into three parts: The south unit; the north unit and the Elkhorn Ranch Site. The south unit is 24 miles east of the border with Montana in the nice town of Medora. In addition to the main entrance to the park, there is a Painted Canyon Entrance which has a viewpoint, a visitors center and access to some of the parks trails. I did not go there but used the main Medora Entrance and took the 36 mile Scenic Loop Drive. There are a number of hiking trails in the South Unit ranging from short interpretive trails to longer trails like the 16 mile Petrified Forest Loop Trail. You can also access the 96 mile Maah Daah Hey Trail here.

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    Blanchard, North Dakota

    by Basaic Written Mar 16, 2012

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    Blanchard is a small town near the North Dakota/Minnesota border. It is also near the intersection of North Dakota Highways 18 and 200. Its main claim to fame is the KVLY TV-Mast, the second tallest man-made structure in the world.

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    Amidon, North Dakota

    by Basaic Written Mar 16, 2012

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    Amidon is the county seat of Slope County and is located in Southwest North Dakota. As of the 2000 Census, Amidon was the second least populace county seat in the United States with a population of 26 (after Mentone in Loving County Texas). The whole county has a population of 776 (as of the 2000 census). Pictured here is the Slope County Courthouse. I am not aware if the courthouse is of any historical significance or even when it was built; but it is fairly unique.

    I think it is now the least populace as the population in Amidon dropped to 23 and the population in Mentone exploded to about 90.

    White Butte at 3506 feet (1062 meters) is the highest point in North Dakota and is located in Slope County near Amidon.

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    T. J. Walker State Historic Site

    by Basaic Written Mar 16, 2012

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    Also near Fort Ransom is the T. J. Walker Historic District State Historic Site. Walker came to North Dakota from Minnesota in 1879. He soon selected an area here on the south side of the river to place rocks for a dam and built a saw mill and a flour mill. Walker continued to expand his enterprises through 1906 and the area prospered. Walker's home, mill, general store (now the Ransom County Museum), and other historic buildings are still intact and are part of the site. In 1979, the U. S. Department of the Interior recognized the historical and cultural significance of this site and placed it on the National Register of Historic Places.

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    Standing Rock State Historic Site

    by Basaic Updated Mar 16, 2012

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    In 1881, the death of local resident Marie Slattum revealed a problem for the local community. They had no church, no pastor, and no cemetery. Slattum's funeral was held in the Slattum Home with a neighbor Ole Rufsvold presiding. On 23 February 1882, the Standing Rock Norwegian Evangelical Church was organized at the home of a local lay preacher Niels Olson. The beautiful church standing here today was built in the 1890s. The original altar with a local artist's rendition of Christ with an angel is still the centerpiece of the church. The Standing Rock SHS is near Fort Ransom.

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    Killdeer Mountain Battlefield State Historic Site

    by Basaic Written Mar 16, 2012

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    Killdeer Mountain, called "Tachkawute" by the Sioux (Nakota Dialect), is the site of an attack by a military force under General Alfred Sully on several groups of Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota (Sioux) tribes on 28 July 1864. Sully attacked the encampments, which included women and children, with cavalry and cannons. Many of the Sioux escaped across an opening in Killdeer Mountain called "Medicine Hole". Unfortunately, many of the tribe members attacked had not participated in earlier attacks and this action further embittered many of the Northern Plains Indian Tribes, and helped precipitate the Sioux Wars of the 1870s.

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    Fort Dilts State Historic Site

    by Basaic Updated Mar 16, 2012

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    Fort Dilts State Historic Site is the location of a makeshift fort of prairie sod made by members of a wagon train and their 50 man military escort to defend themselves against hostile Sioux Indians in September 1864. The fort was named after Corporal Jefferson Dilts who died defending the wagon train. The site is located near Bowman in the Southwest corner of the state.

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    De Mores State Historic Site

    by Basaic Written Mar 16, 2012

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    Des Mores State Historic Site preserves the home and ranch of Antoine Amedee Vincent Amat Manca de Vallombrosa the Marquis de Mores et Montemaggiore. De Mores was born in Paris on 14 June 1858 and descended from French, Italian, and Spanish nobility. He was a soldier in the cavalry but found peacetime too boring so he emigrated to New York where he worked in a bank and made a study of cattle ranching. While in New York he met and fell in love with a beautiful banker's daughter Medora von Hoffman. After his cousin returned from the Dakotas with stories of his adventures, de Mores decided to come here and start a ranch. He selected this site and bought land along the Little Missouri River. He then laid out the plan for a town which he named after his wife, Medora. The couple were very well loved by the townspeople.

    Today this is one of the most interesting historic sites in the state. The house is well preserved and full of original and period items relating to the Marquis stay here. There is also a nice display about the Civilian Conservation Corps and nice scenery. Admission was $7.

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    Fargo

    by grayfo Updated May 3, 2011

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    Fargo was founded in 1871 and is the largest city in the U.S. state of North Dakota and the county seat of Cass County. Fargo is the cultural, retail, manufacturing, health care, and educational hub for the region and is also home to North Dakota State University.

    March 2011

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    Maah Daah Hey Trail

    by pipsqueak Updated Apr 4, 2011

    The Maah Daah Hey Trail is a 100-mile long multi-use trail that runs from the North Unit of Theodore Roosevelt National Park to the South Unit near Medora. The trail is open to hikers, horseback riders and mountain bikers. There are primitive campsites along the way but water may or may not be available. I rode a portion of the trail on my mountain bike, and it was fantastic. There are some incredible vistas, and the riding is a challenge, but not so technical that people of slightly above average ability will have no problems.
    Look on the link below to get more information including a PDF map. The pic is me at the north end of the trail near the CCC campground.

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    Visit the On-a-Slant Indian Village

    by pipsqueak Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This abandoned village, which dates to the late 1500's, was across the Missouri river from where Lewis and Clark (The corps of Discovery) camped in 1804.
    It has 4 of the earthen lodges reconstucted. At one time there were around 80 lodges at the site. Each one has a different interior, and gives you an idea of the ingenuity of the Native Mandan people. There was room inside for the horses, which helped keep the lodge warm.
    If you are following the Lewis and Clark trail, I think this is a better stop than the Knife River Indian Village near Stanton.

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North Dakota Things to Do

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