Cincinnati Local Customs

  • Skyline Chili
    Skyline Chili
    by dlandt
  • Local Customs
    by Grootpiet
  • No hay como el amor entre hermanas.
    No hay como el amor entre hermanas.
    by SerSol

Most Recent Local Customs in Cincinnati

  • stoney13's Profile Photo

    the way we talk.....

    by stoney13 Written May 9, 2007

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    I have been told, by just traveling 45 mins. away, that some of our words are wierd. so heres a little vocab lesson for ya...

    pony keg- this is a drive-thru store, not to be confused with a mini keg of beer.

    please? - we cincinnatians will use this in place of "excuse me" if we didn't hear you or didn't understand. we are not asking for anything.

    3-way- this is food you dirty people!!! it is pure cincinnati chili! spaghetti, chili & cheese. its worth coming to cincy just for this little treat, you have never tasted chili like ours!

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    Cincinnati Chili

    by dlandt Written Dec 19, 2006

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    Skyline Chili

    There is a particular style of chili which is associated with Cincinnati. It is less "beefy" than chicago style chili, and more "soupy" than most texas style chilis, but it has a strong and very distinct flavor. in general, if you don't like strong flavors, you won't like Cincinnati chili, but if you do, you should like it. Cincinnati style chili is made with nutmeg and allspice (or so I hear) and other flaovrs, so while it is strong it isn't exactly "hot". The place everyone says to go for this is Skyline Chili and there are 20-30 of these restaurants scattered through the city. This is definitely a local thing, and their efforts to expand into other cities (Dayton and Columbus excepted) haven't been successful (like we needed another chain restaurant anyway) so you will have to come to Cincinnati to try it.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

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    Goetta

    by frankcanfly Updated Jul 18, 2006

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    Goetta (pronounced 'getta') is a regional dish created by German Immigrants. It is a mix of Pork, Beef and some oats. It's a little like a flat sausage patty.

    Go to Price Hill Chili for a Goetta Cheese Omelette!!

    You can even buy it from the nation's only 'meat vending machine' in Covington, OH.

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    Flying Pig

    by frankcanfly Updated Oct 28, 2005

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    Why is the pig such an icon for Cincinnati?

    Once the nation's largest pork-packing center the city earned the name "Porkopolis" and hogged it for the first half of the 19th Century. Cincinnati slaughterhouses supplied the tables of the British Navy and even Queen Victoria's royal table.

    The was no garbage collection in the 1800s because of the swine that freely roamed the downtown City blocks, eating as they waddled.

    The impact if felt today: Candlemaker James Gamble and entrepreneur William Procter discovered that a byproduct, pork fat, could be used to develop a high-quality soap, which they cut into small blocks. Ivory soap is still advertised as 99 & 44/100 percent pure!

    In the late 1980's, a sculptor placed some whimsical 'flying pig' statues at the entrance to Sawyer Park on the river. It was a tribute to the steamboats that dominated the Ohio river and transported sausage.

    Eventually, other 'tongue in cheek' statues emerged, such as: Hamlet, Pigaletto, Pigasso, Porkemon, Dr. Frankenswine, Pag-mailion and Road Hog.

    There is also an annual "Flying Pig" marathon every May in Cincinnati.

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    The Subway to Nowhere

    by frankcanfly Updated Oct 28, 2005

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    From Cincinnati's "Annual Manual":

    Yes, Cincinnat has a subway. It never actually operated, mind you , but it exists: two miles of winding track and tunnels that snake underneath Central Parkway and wind all the way up to "Liberty Street Station."

    Descend the stariway and you've entered another world, a subterranean concerete cavern with high ceilings, a passenger platform and two rail lines. Imagining a decrepit, crubling mess? Far from it. the city engineers office keeps the place well maintained. No choice, really, if they didn't, Central Parkway would collapse into the Pothole from Hell.

    the history of the subway is tinged with melcancholy and irony. Built by the city along the former bend of the Miami and Erie canal, the tunnels are the first section of what was intended to become a 16 mile loop circling downtown. Voters approved a $6 million bond issue in 1916 for the construction project, but by the 1920's the Boss Cox machine had spent all the money building the first section and acquiring land rights for the rest. Then came the Great Depression, World War II, the rise of the Model T and automobile nation, the birth of the Interstates....

    Today, the only productve moment for the abandoned project comes when the cincinnati Historical Society offers tours. It's generally dry down in the tunnels, though visitors do encounter a musty odor. No rats scramble around, none visible anyhow. Just miles and miles of tunnels.

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    Kroger Building - Trompe l'Oeil Mural

    by BeatChick Updated Sep 20, 2005

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    Cincinnatus - Trompe l'Oeil
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    One of the cool things indicative of Cincinnati is the trompe l'oeil mural painted on the side of the Brotherhood (Kroger) Building on Central Parkway downtown. You'll see this mural of Cincinnatus painted in a classical setting where the trompe l'oeil (trick of the eye) effect causes you to think the building curves in where the dome is painted into the mural. I always pause for a second to take this view in.

    The painting was commissioned by the Kroger Company for their Centenniel in 1983 and they chose NYC artist, Richard Haas, to execute it.

    Located on the Brotherhood (Kroger) Building on Central Parkway along Central Parkway.

    Photos: August & September 2005

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Family Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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  • frankcanfly's Profile Photo

    Skyline Chili

    by frankcanfly Updated Jul 13, 2005

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    Skyline Chili is a local institution, and serves great food. Here's a photo of the original in the Clifton Gaslight District.

    Some History from the Skyline Chili Website:

    A storied past. A bright future.

    In 1949, on a hilltop overlooking Cincinnati, Ohio, Nicholas Lambrinides and his sons opened a small restaurant and began serving what would soon become a Cincinnati icon—Skyline Chili. The name came from the impressive view of the city's outline against the sky and has since become synonymous with a unique dish known as Cincinnati-style chili. Today, there are more than 100 Skyline Chili restaurants in four states, a credit to the vision of Nicholas Lambrinides and his sons—men who had the determination to perfect a truly new dining experience way back in 1949.

    A simple product…simply made.

    Since the beginning, the appeal of Skyline Chili to operators and customers alike has been its simplicity and unique taste. Our famous, easily assembled 3-, 4-, and 5-Way chili dishes, along with our unique Coney Island "Cheese Coneys," represent nearly 75 percent of sales. From an operator's standpoint, you can imagine the efficiencies this creates in the back of the house and in providing fast service to our guests. Customers place their order with a Skyline Chili table server and, within minutes, they receive a delicious meal.

    The quality of our secret recipe chili is no mystery.

    Skyline's secret-recipe chili is cooked daily at our commissary to maintain a high level of quality. The commissary, which is centrally located just outside Cincinnati, produces the chili and packages it so that it only needs to be reheated at each restaurant unit. This "heat and serve" method helps our restaurants achieve consistent quality and keeps food preparation simple. We constantly strive to find ways to keep our restaurant operation streamlined.

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    Please?

    by frankcanfly Written May 7, 2005

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    Don't be confused... When you are speaking to locals of the Cincinnati area, you might here them saying 'Please?'

    They are actually trying to tell you to repeat yourself, because they didn't understand you.

    Because so many locals have a German background, it's a direct translation from the German language. In German, you say 'bitte' when you want someone to repeat themselves... Bitte also means Please.

    Another mystery solved.

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    Sin City Hash House Harriers and Harriettes

    by frankcanfly Written Apr 25, 2005
    In the Beer Circle

    If you follow my pages, you know that I enjoy running with the Hash House Harriers in many of the cities I visit.

    I've just had one run with this group, and I enjoyed their company.

    More adventures to come.

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  • BeatChick's Profile Photo

    Church of the Steps - Mt. Adams

    by BeatChick Written Feb 3, 2005

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    Immaculata Church Historical Marker - Cincinnati
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    Welcome to the Church of the Steps in Mt. Adams, otherwise known as the Holy Cross Immaculata Church. Each Good Friday before Easter the local Catholic faithful mark their devotions by climbing up the 84 steep stone steps praying the beads of the rosary all the way.

    In addition to its role in the Good Friday pilgrimages, the church is also lovely architecture. You'll also find this to be one of the best spots to look out over the city & enjoy a sunrise or sunset.

    Inside of the church you will find altarpieces painted by Cincinnati artist Frank Duveneck's art teacher, Johann Schmitt.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

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  • kahunayummy's Profile Photo

    Cincinnati Flying Pig Marathon

    by kahunayummy Updated Dec 14, 2004

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    Home of the Flying Pigs

    Could Cincinniti Have Been Named Porkopolis?

    Pigs fetch fat prices
    “Topigary,” the purloined pig, led the pack at the Big Pig Gig auction with a winning bid of $37,500.
    Where have all the pigs gone?

    Award winners
    We asked you to vote for your favorite pigs from the Big Pig Gig for what we're calling the Hammy Awards.
    Art critic's picks

    Pork in the road
    Dauber is well known in the custom-car field as a master free-hand paint striper and flame painter. Now, he can add pig artist to his resume.
    The artists behind the CAM's pigs

    What to do with a Big Gig Pig?
    As our painted pigs head to the auction block Nov. 13, Jim Borgman answers the question on everyone's mind.

    Where the pigs are
    Cincinnati has more pigs than Chicago has cows. And they're more Pigturesque.
    New Big Pig Gig map Listing of all pigs

    Tourists steal pig
    Two 26-year-old tourists tried to steal a piggy early Thursday morning. They landed, instead, in the pokey.
    Please don't abuse the pigs
    Hogspital fixes broken pigs

    Here is a view (Top Left) of the famous flying pigs in Sawyer Point park. They symbolize Cincinnati's past as being the Pork capital of the U.S. or Porkopolis. They stand proudly on top of smokestacks representing Cincinnati's heritage of being a major port on the Ohio River for steamboats in the 19th Century.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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  • kahunayummy's Profile Photo

    Rated One of the 5 Best Landmark's of Cincinnati

    by kahunayummy Written Dec 13, 2004

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    Cincinnati Music Hall

    Built in 1878 with private money raised from what is believed to be the nation's first matching grant fund drive, this Cincinnati showpiece has been renovated and updated and includes what is judged to be among the best and most beautiful concert theaters in the world.

    Springer Auditorium is known the world over for its extraordinary acoustics and its lavish old world decor. With its plush seating for 3,516, it serves as home for the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, the Cincinnati Opera and the May Festival Chorus, among other local performing arts organizations. In addition, throughout the year it hosts a large number of touring performances, conferences, concerts and awards ceremonies. The fully-equipped stage with a complete lighting system, hydraulically-operated orchestra pit and roomy backstage area make any type of production or performance possible.

    Music Hall Ballroom - One of the most versatile spaces in Cincinnati, the Music Hall Ballroom is the second largest meeting space in the city. It is frequently used for large receptions, exhibitions, fashion shows, class reunions and breakfast, lunch and dinner gatherings. It can also be used for stage performances and lectures.

    The Ballroom is also equipped with state-of-the-art sound and lighting equipment. The large bar area makes the Ballroom a perfect place for parties, according to the groups who come back year after year for annual functions.

    Corbett Tower - This upstairs reception room is charming. The exquisite decor and sparkling chandeliers, equally resplendent as the Auditorium, provide a unique setting for a wide variety of events, ranging from weddings and receptions to grand dinners and parties. The stage, controlled sound and light systems, dance floor, kitchen, bar facilities make Corbett Tower as practical as it is elegant.

    Music Hall as a national historic monument and as one of the world's foremost performing arts and entertainment facilities.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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    Please?

    by kdoc13 Updated Sep 9, 2004

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    Oh puh-leaze

    At some point when you arrive in Cincinnati a local will say something that will make you stop dead in your tracks and look at them like a deer caught in the headlights. Most often it is when they say please.

    Oh no, it would be easy to say please when asking for something. Like Please pass me the large greasy pork sandwich. But no! This is not your ordinary city.

    Here the locals use it in place of the more common "excuse me." So if someone didn't hear what you just said, they don't say "What?" Or "Excuse me?" They instead say "Please?" And boy is it annoying!!!! It takes many years of getting used to if you aren't already accustomed to it.

    How many times has a local looked at me and said "Please?" while I just sat there trying to figure out why they were imploring me to do something, or asking for some favor. It is really frustrating, but that is pretty much Cincinnati anyway.

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    Tip your Valet!!!!

    by Cincinnati1313 Written Apr 24, 2004

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    Valet's work for tips. Regardless of what story your sister's brother's cousin told you about someone stealing something or wrecking their car many valet's are responsible and willing to take excellent care of your car as long as you take care of them. Valet's are an excellent source of information about the city and if they don't know something they most likely know someone that does. Most of all the best thing to remember is that if you take care of them they will take care of you. When checking in to a hotel if a valet or a doorman takes care of your car and your bags it is customary to give them about $1 a bag or $2 for just taking care of the car. When picking up your car it is customary to give the valet anywhere from $2 to $5 dollars.

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    Don't eat Sushi in...

    by Sunshine64 Written Aug 25, 2002

    Don't eat Sushi in Cincinnati!.... Well, maybe that's a hasty generalization. The front desk at the Westin, however, recommended a sushi restaurant (Ko-sho) and it was not good. In fact, 6 of us went, and we all agreed it was the worst sushi we'd had.

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Cincinnati Local Customs

Reviews and photos of Cincinnati local customs posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Cincinnati sightseeing.

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