Hocking Hills State Park Things to Do

  • another view of the trails
    another view of the trails
    by butterflykizzez04
  • Tayler, Noel & Cullen at Upper Falls
    Tayler, Noel & Cullen at Upper Falls
    by butterflykizzez04
  • Tayler, Cullen & Noel in the cave
    Tayler, Cullen & Noel in the cave
    by butterflykizzez04

Most Recent Things to Do in Hocking Hills State Park

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    Lower Falls near Old Man's Cave

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Jun 1, 2005

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    lower falls near old man's cave

    The Old Man's Cave area can be divided into five principal sections found along the valley of Old Man's Creek. In order, they are: Upper Falls, Upper Gorge, Middle Falls, Lower Falls and Lower Gorge. Along the length of the trail the magnificent gorge cuts through the entire 150-foot thickness of the Blackhand sandstone. Carved by the creek, the gorge serves as an avenue for visitors to peer into the earth's subsurface. The full distance of the gorge is approximately one half mile.

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    Upper Falls at Old Man's Cave

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Jun 1, 2005

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    Upper falls near Old Man's Cave

    The most popular of all the Hocking areas is Old Man's Cave, located on State Route 664. Here at the Upper Falls, the Grandma Gatewood Trail begins its six-mile course connecting three of the park's areas: Old Man's Cave to Cedar Falls to Ash Cave. This same trail has been designated as part of Ohio's Buckeye Trail as well as part of two national systems - the North Country Scenic Trail and America's Discovery Trail.

    Old Man's Cave derives its name from the hermit Richard Rowe who lived in the large recess cave of the gorge. His family moved to the Ohio River Valley around 1796 from the Cumberland Mountains of Tennessee to establish a trading post. He and his two dogs traveled through Ohio along the Scioto River in search of game. On one side trip up Salt Creek, he found the Hocking Region. Rowe lived out his life in the area and is buried beneath the ledge of the main recess cave. Earlier residents of the cave were two brothers, Nathaniel and Pat Rayon, who came to the area in 1795. They built a permanent cabin 30 feet north of the cave entrance. Both brothers are buried in or near the cave. Their cabin was later dismantled and relocated on the nearby Iles farm to be used as a tobacco drying house.

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    hiking trails

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Jun 1, 2005

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    the kids on the hiking trail

    The cave areas were well-known as scenic attractions by 1870. In 1924, the first land purchase by the state was made to preserve the scenic features. This first parcel of 146 acres included Old Man's Cave. Subsequent purchases built acreage while the areas existed under the Department of Forestry as State Forest Parks. The Department of Natural Resources was created in 1949 and the new Division of Parks assumed control of the Hocking Hills State Park complex, which today includes the six park areas. A dining lodge and cottages were opened in 1972. These cottages, together with a campground, provide overnight facilities in one of the most beautiful areas of our state.

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    check out Suspension A frame bridge on trail.

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Jun 1, 2005

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    kids below the A frame suspension bridge

    Local Attractions The hollows and caves of the park complex have long attracted the peoples of Ohio. Evidence of the ancient Adena culture illustrates man first inhabited the recesses more than 7,000 years ago.

    In the mid 1700's several Indian tribes traveled through or lived here including the Wyandot, Delaware and Shawnee. Their name for the river from which the park gets its name was Hockhocking of "bottle river." The name comes from the bottle-shaped valley of the Hocking River whose formation is due to its one-time blockage by glacial ice.

    After the Greenville Treaty of 1795, numerous white settlers moved into the region and Hocking County was organized in 1818. The area around the parks began to develop in 1835 when a powder mill was built near Rock House and a grist mill was constructed at Cedar Falls.

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    Ash Cave

    by yooperprof Written Jan 20, 2004

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    No speleologists here

    The caves are not subterranean - they are actually massive overhanding shelves of rock. When I was there 10 years ago you were allowed to walk right along the cliff edge. And because the Hocking Hills are not very well known outside of Ohio, there weren't very many people there even though it was a weekend. (It's probably more crowded in the summer.)

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    • National/State Park

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    Another Falls

    by yooperprof Written Jan 20, 2004

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    back to nature

    There aren't a lot of store near Hocking Hills, so if you are driving here for the day, you might want to pick up picnic stuff in Athens or Columbus.

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    • National/State Park

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Hocking Hills State Park Things to Do

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