Unique Places in Ohio

  • Master Bedroom of the Old Vermilion Jailhouse
    Master Bedroom of the Old Vermilion...
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    Paradise cell with painting on wall of...
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Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Ohio

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    Brandywine Falls

    by ant1606 Updated Feb 26, 2013

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    Cuyahoga Valley Naional Park lies around the homonym river in the Cleveland metro area. One of the tributaries, the Branwywine Creek, has carved a gorge after an 18-meter drop. This isn't an extraordinary waterfall but worth a visit while taking a hike on one of the numerous trails around the park, or just the one-minute walk from the parking lot. Nice when frozen.
    Official website
    My GPS track

    Brandywine Falls Brandywine Falls Brandywine Falls
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    Cleveland - Cuyahoga Valley NP

    by ant1606 Written Oct 28, 2012

    Metropolitan Cleveland has a decent extension of green areas for public use. One of these is the Cuyahoga Valley National Park featuring multipurpose trails, bluffs and ledges, waterfalls and woodland.
    Originally exceeding 300 miles in length, a good portion of the accessible present-day 100-mile long Ohio & Erie Canal Towpath Trail lies within the park limits. A favorite of runners and cyclists, this trail was once trodden by mules and horses that pulled boats upstream. This waterway played a fundamental role in the industrial development of Ohio until superseded by the railroads.
    Although I haven't tried it, the Scenic Railroad seems a great opportunity to savor an historical train and quaint small stations, but also to cycle one way and hop aboard on the way back for only a $2 fare. Service operates from May through October.

    Link to map and partial Towpath track

    CVNP - Ohio & Erie Canal Towpath CVNP - Ohio & Erie Canal Towpath CVNP - Ohio & Erie Canal Towpath CVNP - Ohio & Erie Canal Towpath CVNP - Ohio & Erie Canal Towpath
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    Old Woman Creek Reserve

    by WheninRome Updated Apr 4, 2011

    Old Woman Creek Reserve is a small nature preserve located on the eastern edge of Erie County, Ohio. The preserve is beautiful, but is mostly noted for the estuary environment it protects, where Lake Erie water mixes with water flowing from Old Woman Creek to create a different and unique water chemistry - a freshwater estuary.

    The preserve is over 550 acres in size and is composed of freshwater marshes, swamp and upland forests, freshwater estuarine environs, and riparian habitat. It also has a large diversity of wildlife and supposedly a nice nature center, which is closed on Monday's (the day we were there).

    Old Woman Creek has a couple nice, albeit relatively short, hiking trails and wildlife viewing areas. I had hoped to witness a bald eagle while there but was unsuccessful.

    2514 Cleveland Road, East
    Huron, OH 44839

    Old Woman Creek is not a far drive from the Hudson Harbor Lighthouse and they make nice companion activities.

    The Estuary Upland Forest Trail Made of Recycled Plastic Lumber Jack in the Pulpit
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    • Birdwatching
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Caesar Creek State Park

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Caesar Creek State Park lies in southwestern Ohio in three counties: Warren, Clinton and Greene. The centerpiece of the park is the 2,830-acre Caesar Creek Lake, a reservoir built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in the 1970s. The dam is 3 miles above the mouth of Caesar Creek, a tributary of the Little Miami River. The reservoir was built for flood control, and also offers outstanding recreational opportunities, as well as a water supply for nearby communities.

    Operated jointly by the Corps of Engineers and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, the park is popular with those who enjoy camping, fishing, hunting, boating, picnicking and hiking. Karen and I have particularly enjoyed walking some of the 43 miles of trails, which lead along the lakeshore and through deep wooded ravines, woodlands and meadows.

    There is also a very nice Nature Center in the Park and a restored Pioneer Village, with 15 historic structures depicting life in the early 1800s.

    The park is open year round; there is no admission charge.

    Address:
    8570 East S.R. 73
    Waynesville, OH 4506

    Caesar Creek Lake, from the Dam Caesar Creek Gorge, below the Dam
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    Mountain Biking at Quail Hollow State Park

    by WheninRome Updated Apr 4, 2011

    The mountain biking trail at Quail Hollow is one of Northeast Ohio's newer fat tire trails. It is about a 4-mile loop, perfect for beginner and intermediate riders, but it may be a little too mundane for experienced bikers. The trail is packed pretty hard and dries out fairly quickly after rainstorms although there is a field area that you cross about half way through the ride that tends to flood during large storm events. A friend of mine has told me about how he has ridden through it with muddy water up to his bottle holder.

    A good description of the trail is located at the Cleveland Area Mountain Bike Association's (CAMBA) website below.
    http://www.camba.us/pn/

    If you are or are with a beginner to intermediate mountain biker and are in the Akron/Cleveland/Canton area I would recommend a trip here. On a typical day we would do 2 to 3 circuits of the trail with each circuit taking between 30 minutes 75 minutes depending on how fast/slow you ride.

    The map linked in the website below really sucks, but it will get you to the Park. Once there just follow the signs to the mountain bike trail. On a nice day there is bound to be a couple bikers out so just look for them and their cars.

    DANGER: When on the trail keep an eye out for horses!!! Sometimes horseback riders will illegally use the trail. I am not sure who would win in a collision, but I wouldn't want to find out.

    Photos coming soon.

    Related to:
    • Cycling
    • National/State Park

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    Marblehead Lighthouse

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    At the northern tip of Ohio, on the shore of Lake Erie, stands Marblehead Lighthouse, the oldest light on the Great Lakes, and still one of the most picturesque. The 65 feet tall stone tower, built in 1821, is in an idyllic setting, at the eastern tip of Marblehead Peninsula, where Hwy. #163 dead-ends at a rocky point jutting out into Lake Erie.

    Marblehead lighthouse has been the subject of a United States Postage Stamp, and it's likeness also appears on one version of the Ohio state license plate. It is no doubt one of the most photographed landmarks in the Buckeye State. The lighthouse, still active, is preserved in a 9 acre state park. The old keeper's house beside the light is now a museum, and there are also picnic areas in the park. Tours are offered June - October. Click on the web link below for current times.

    Marblehead Lighthouse
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    • Beaches

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    The Seven Caves

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Located in Highland County in southern Ohio, The Seven Caves is a wondrous place. It is an Ohio Natural Landmark, comprised of a stunningly beautiful gorge about 70 feet deep, cut by Rocky Fork and Paint Creeks. Three well marked trails lead visitors on a self guided tour to - and through - The 7 Caves, each with it's own unique formations and appeal: Witches Phantom, Bear, McKimie, Marble, Dancing, and Cave of the Springs. The caves are rich in history and legends of Indians, outlaws, early settlers, and wildlife. In addition to the caves themselves, there are numerous other interesting geologic features you will see along the trails: Sweetheart Falls, Sleepy Hollow, Devil's Ice Box, Phantom Chimney, Fairies Grotto and more. We spent a very enjoyable afternoon exploring here and felt it was well worth our visit.

    This is a privately owned park and is open year 'round from 9-6 daily. Although the caves are illuminated, a flashlight might also be useful for more thorough exploration. There is also a shady picnic grove, and the Cliff House, which offers gift items and snacks.

    Admission is $10 for adults, with discounts being offered to seniors and groups. Children are half price. Three Ohio state parks are within 20 miles of The 7 Caves: Paint Creek, Rocky Fork and Pike Lake. At the campgrounds for each of these parks one may obtain a discount coupon for $2.00 off the admission price to The 7 Caves. A discount coupon may also be printed out from the web site listed below.

    Address:
    7600 Cave Road
    Bainbridge, OH 45612

    Looking out from Cave of the Springs
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    Shawnee State Park

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This wonderful gem of a state park is on the southern edge of Ohio, near the Ohio River, and in the foothills of the Appalachians. It is surrounded by the 63,000 acre Shawnee State Forest, with wooded hills so picturesque that the area is know as "The Little Smokies." These were the ancient hunting grounds of the Shawnee Indians, and still one of Ohio's prime areas for wildlife.

    We have camped in the park and taken advantage of the beautiful hiking trails that are here. Other ammenities include a modern Lodge, restaurant, cottages, boating, fishing, swimming, golf, a horse camp, and more. The park is far from major metropolitan areas and seldom crowded.

    Our Campsite at Shawnee in October
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    • Camping

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    FAIRPORT HARBOR

    by mtncorg Written Apr 26, 2008

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    This harbor along the south shores of Lake Erie was important as both a point of passage for early Mormon ‘gatherers’ coming from the religion’s home grounds in New York and for missionaries who sallied forth throughout the then civilized areas of North America. Two lighthouses originally lit the way for boats coming into the harbor off the lake - the main lighthouse being erected in 1825 as the port became an important transshipment point for the Eire Canal port of Buffalo.

    Joseph Smith, Jr., announced, in December 1830, that believers should gather to the Kirtland, Ohio. Original members were concentrated in three New York localities. So in three companies, they came west in the spring of 1831, through Buffalo and over the lake to Fairport - 67 from Colesville, near Binghamton, 80 from Fayette and another 50 from Manchester (both near Syracuse). As compared to future Mormon exoduses, this was a fairly easy journey, but still, the process of ‘gathering’ meant most everything people had was left behind. Property and goods sold for a pittance on short notice. The process would be repeated several times more in the future. A plaque was erected in 2003 to commemorate those who journeyed through Fairport and the role the town and port played in Mormon history. An exhibit further describing that history is found in the Fairport Museum.

    Looking over frozen Lake Erie at Fairport Harbor Monument to early Mormon 'gatherers' The Fariport Harbor Lighthous Museum View from the Lighthouse to Lake Erie beyond
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    FORT LAURENS

    by mtncorg Written Apr 3, 2008

    Located just off I-77 at the same exit you would take for Zoar, is the only American fort erected during the Revolution - Fort Laurens. The fort was named in honor of the president of the Continental Congress, Henry Laurens, and was a supply point for possible American attacks against British outposts along or near Lake Erie - ie Detroit. The fort was garrisoned by 172 men in late 1778 and came under several attacks by Indians, Loyalists and British during its year of existence. There is a museum here on the site - run by the Ohio Historical Society. Eventually, in 1779, the fort was abandoned. Admission is $4 when the museum is open: June through early September.

    Museum at Fort Laurens Monument to Unknown Revolutionary Soldier
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    Roller Coaster Capital

    by Toughluck Updated Dec 10, 2007

    Cedar Point is the world's? well, at least the US's largest concentration of Roller Coasters. 19 at the last count. If you love amusement parks, it's one of the best. If you love roller coasters, it is the best.

    Raptor passing over the Funway
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    • Theme Park Trips
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    The Portage Lakes

    by Katums14 Written Nov 9, 2007

    Just south of Akron, you will find the Portage Lakes. The area is full of wonderful mom & pop places, like Pav's Creamery, Biggin's Big Dip, Woody's Restaurant, Bailey's, and more. There is a clock tower, several places to rent pontoon boats from, and an amazing fire works display right around the 4th of July. It is a great place for the entire family to go, have fun and get some sun in the summer.

    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating

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    19th Century Kirkland, Ohio

    by JREllison Written Oct 8, 2007

    In the early 1830's a religious group known as "Mormons" settled for awhile in Kirkland before moving on to Missouri, and then on to Utah. The were an industrious people building churches, stores, industry of that time and a Temple. Following their departure in about 1835 mush of the city fell into disrepair. Today the Mormon Church based in Salt Lake City, Utah has purchased much of the land formerly owned by its members and rebuilt or restored a lot of this city. It is like a window into the past a hundred and eighty years ago.

    Exit I-80 East of Cleveland onto Highway 306 Southbound, watch for signs to Kirkland

    Historic Kirkland
    7800 Kirkland-Chardon Road
    Kirkland OH 44234

    Kirkland Temple Lumber Mill Hotel
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    Clifton Mill

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Feb 8, 2007

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    Clifton Mill, built in 1802, is the largest remaining water powered grist mill in the United States. A restaurant at the mill serves breakfast, (famous for buckwheat pancakes), and lunch, but is closed in the evenings.. Karen and I had a great lunch here and enjoyed exploring the old mill and browsing the gift shop. We sat for an hour on the back porch of the mill, waiting out a summer thunderstorm, and were thoroughly enchanted by the rhythmic turning of the waterwheel and the rushing water through Clifton Gorge.

    From Yellow Springs take U.S. 68 (Xenia Ave), turn east on Ohio 343, drive four miles and then turn right on Clay Street. You'll immediately see the mill from Clay.

    Clifton Mill
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    Siep Mound

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Oct 8, 2006

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    Seip Mound is an ancient burial site of the Hopewell Indians who inhabited much of what is present day Ohio from around 100 B.C. until 500 A.D. The mound, which stands 30 feet high and 240 feet long by 130 feet wide is surrounded by about two miles of earthworks. The surrounding earthworks once stood 10 feet high, but have been erroded by time, nature, and cultivation.

    Seip Mound is located in Ross County, off US-50, 14 miles southwest of Chillicothe and about 2 miles east of Bainbridge, Ohio. The site is operated by the Ohio Historical Society and is open year round, during daylight hours. There is a parking lot, picnic area, and interpretative exhibits. There is no admission charge.

    Contact:
    Seip Mound
    Site Operations Department
    The Ohio Historical Society
    1982 Velma Avenue
    Columbus, OH 43211

    Karen atop Siep Mound, Ohio Siep Mound, Ohio Karen at Siep Mound
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    • Archeology
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