Sandusky Things to Do

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    by Yaqui
  • Things to Do
    by Yaqui
  • Things to Do
    by Yaqui

Most Recent Things to Do in Sandusky

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    Fire Station No.1 1915

    by Yaqui Written Feb 20, 2013

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    Fire Station No.1 is listed on the National Register of Historic Places #178496 October 20, 1982, Architectural style Late 19th and 20th Century Revival. Sandusky has so many wonderful historical buildings. This one is very special since it is the first one.

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    Magee Marsh Wildlife Area Trial

    by Yaqui Written Feb 20, 2013

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    The Magee Marsh Wildlife Area, purchased by the Ohio Division of Wildlife in August 1951, lies in some of Ohio’s finest remaining wetlands. The marsh complex has historically been inhabited by large numbers of waterfowl, waterbirds, shorebirds, and songbirds. The primary responsibility at Magee Marsh is the development and maintenance of high quality wetland habitat for a diverse array of wetland wildlife species.

    The Sportsmen’s Migratory Bird Center features exhibits on the history of the marsh and an extensive collection of mounted birds and mammals that inhabit the marsh. The center is surrounded by a display pond, walking trail and 42-foot tall observation deck that offers views of the marshes and Lake Erie. Additional trails include the Wildlife Beach Trail, the Bird Trail and the Magee/Ottawa Partnership Trail, which connects to the adjacent Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge.

    We decided to barrow some bikes from our brother and ride the trails they have here. Plus it is a great place to do some bird watching.

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    Magee Marsh Wildlife Area Marker

    by Yaqui Updated Feb 20, 2013

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    The marker reads:
    Front Text : "Magee Marsh Wildlife Area - A Feature of the Great Black Swamp"
    A dense swamp forest roughly the size of the state of Connecticut once stretched across this region of Ohio and Indiana. A remnant of ancient Lake Maumee, this dense, soggy flatland supported abundant waterfowl and wildlife, but blocked travel and settlement and remained largely uninhabited until it was cleared and drained for agriculture between 1860 and 1885. This marsh and other scatter remnants are all that remain of the Great Black Swamp. Managed for a variety of wetland wildlife, Magee is one of the premier bird watching sites in North America, with more than 300 species.

    Back Text : "Magee Marsh Wildlife Area - A Feature of the Great Black Swamp"
    A dense swamp forest roughly the size of the state of Connecticut once stretched across this region of Ohio and Indiana. A remnant of ancient Lake Maumee, this dense, soggy flatland supported abundant waterfowl and wildlife, but blocked travel and settlement and remained largely uninhabited until it was cleared and drained for agriculture between 1860 and 1885. This marsh and other scatter remnants are all that remain of the Great Black Swamp. Managed for a variety of wetland wildlife, Magee is one of the premier bird watching sites in North America, with more than 300 species.

    Fake eagles...lol!
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    Liberty Aviation Museum

    by Yaqui Written Feb 20, 2013

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    Established on December 1991as Liberty Aviation Museum that houses many wonderful preserved WWII era aircraft and vehicles. The facilities were built in 2011-2012, with the artifacts being housed throughout the museum, lobby, gift shop, and hangar, and includes the beautiful restored 1950's diner, Tin Goose Diner - serving food and open to the public seven days a week.

    Hours
    Sun. - Thu.: 10:00am - 4:00pm
    Friday: 10:00am - 5:00pm
    Saturday: 10:00am - 5:00pm

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    Lighthouse Lure

    by gabbygerty Updated Apr 4, 2011

    The Marblehead Lighthouse is the most photographed lighthouse on the Great Lakes and I can see why. It located in the charming town of Marblehead, Ohio with quaint gift and antique shops. They even have an old schoolhouse that's been converted into shops. The Lighthouse itself is situated in a beautiful state park right on the water. You can see Cedar Point from the top as well as the Lake Erie Islands of South Bass (Put-in-Bay) and Kelleys. The tours are only a couple bucks per person and you also get to see inside the lighthouse keeper's house. Tours are generally offered on the weekdays and the second Saturday of each month during the summer. The property is open year-round so if you want to have a picnic in October you can!

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    Coming Home Sculpture

    by Yaqui Written Mar 13, 2011

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    Coming Home by Larry Anderson
    Dedicated to Ohio Veterans
    Who Have Served Their Country
    Made Possible Through
    The Generous Contributions of
    Ceil Hough Frost
    and other donors
    September 17, 1988

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    Ohio Veteran Home Museum

    by Yaqui Updated Mar 13, 2011

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    This musuem is housed in a Richardsonian architectural style building called the I.F. Mack Building. Named after prominent Sandusky resident and the first President of the Board of Trustees, Isaac Foster Mack. In 1888, the original administration offices of the then name Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Home was housed in the I.F. Mack Building. Since opening in the Mack Building in 1996, the Ohio Veterans Home Musuem has consistently increased it's number of visitors on an annual basis.

    It's exhibits are:
    Civil War & Spanish-American Room
    The Great War- World War 1 Room
    World War II Room
    Korea, Vietnam to Present Room
    Ohio Veterans to Present Room
    Ohio Veterans Home History Room
    Veterans Organizations Room
    Johnson's Island Preservation Society

    This musuem is free and does not recieve any state or federal assistance. Donations are graciously accepted. Hours of operation are:
    Saturday through Wednesday
    1000am to 400pm

    Closed Thursday and Friday

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    Veterans Homes Buidings 1898-1908

    by Yaqui Written Mar 13, 2011

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    Taken from the back of the marker:
    Built of Sandusky Blue Limestone with sandstone details in the Richardsonian Romanesque style, the restored I.F. Mack Administration Building houses museums for the Ohio Veterans Hall of Fame and the Ohio Veterans Home. Six remaining residential cottages, also in the Romanesque style, were built between 1896 and 1908. Original houses of Officers' Row stand along DeWitt Avenue. In 1979, the facility was renamed the Ohio Veterans Home (OVH), and has grown to include a modern long-term care facility and "domiciliary," which were completed between 1978 and 1992. The OVH has served veterans representing all of America's major conflicts since the Mexican War. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.

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    Ohio Veterans Home Historical Marker 15-22

    by Yaqui Written Mar 13, 2011

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    Front Text : "Ohio Veterans Home"
    Following the Civil War, many of Ohio's disabled and wounded veterans found inadequate provisions for their long-term needs. In response, the Grand Army of the Republic's Department of Ohio lobbied for a state-operated veterans' home. In 1886 Governor Joseph B. Foraker signed a bill establishing the Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Home for honorably discharged veterans. A board of trustees led by Sandusky publisher I.F. Mack selected the site, and the Sandusky community donated the tract of land, utilities, and a connection to the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The facility opened in November 1888. (continued on other side)

    Back Text on the plaque:

    Built of Sandusky Blue Limestone with sandstone details in the Richardsonian Romanesque style, the restored I.F. Mack Administration Building houses museums for the Ohio Veterans Hall of Fame and the Ohio Veterans Home. Six remaining residential cottages, also in the Romanesque style, were built between 1896 and 1908. Original houses of Officers' Row stand along DeWitt Avenue. In 1979, the facility was renamed the Ohio Veterans Home (OVH), and has grown to include a modern long-term care facility and "domiciliary," which were completed between 1978 and 1992. The OVH has served veterans representing all of America's major conflicts since the Mexica

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    Saint Mary's 1873

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 24, 2010

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    On June 20, 1855 six men signed a note to purchase property in Sandusky, Ohio. In a few short months, St. Mary’s Catholic Church was completed on that lot. The German immigrants of the city, who had been worshiping at Holy Angels, succeeded in founding the second Catholic parish in Sandusky. Since that day, two church buildings, five school buildings, two cemeteries, two rectories, and two convents have been built. In addition, several thousand parishioners have been baptized and buried. Countless children have been educated. Untold numbers of people assisted with clothes, food, money, support and prayers.

    The Germans who immigrated to Sandusky were first led by Fr. John P. Dolweck. Appointed by Rt. Rev. Louis Amadeus Rappe, Bishop of the Diocese of Cleveland, Fr. Dolweck began serving the people of Sandusky in 1853, while still at Holy Angels. Fr. Dolweck was succeeded by Fr. James J. Hamene, who completed construction of the first Church and a rectory. In 1857 St. Mary’s built their first school.

    Several pastors served at St. Mary’s during the Civil War era, each contributing to the growth of the parish and school.

    In 1873, under the direction of Fr. Nicholas Moes, the parish embarked upon a huge construction project, a new church. Noted architect Franz Georg Himpler was employed to plan and oversee the construction. Seven years later, the beautiful new church was dedicated by Bishop Ignatius Horstmann to Mary, Mother of Sorrows. The largest church in the city of Sandusky, this building continues to serve as a home for all parish activities and the center of faith.

    In 1918, Fr. Joseph S. Widmann, who served St. Mary’s his entire 26 year priestly career, died. Fr. Widmann was responsible for building the three story school still in use. He was also pastor when the new Diocese of Toledo was erected.http://stmarysandusky.org/history.html

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    The Merry-Go-Round Museum

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 24, 2010

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    Here is one of the largest collection of beautiful carousel animals seen in the U.S. They have some rare carousel animals seen by the public. After they are brought here, some are missing parts or need to be totally to be stripped, repainted, and or a piece re-carved. It's painstakingly time consuming because they want to do the job right to return a piece of folk art back to its former glory.

    Adults $6
    Seniors (60 & Over) $5
    Children (Ages 4 - 14) $4
    Children 3 and under free

    Months/Days/Times - That The Museum Is Open
    Jan. And Feb.
    Weekends - Saturday (11 - 5 pm) Sunday (12 - 5 pm)
    Spring (March - May)
    Wed. - Sat. (11 am - 5 pm) Sunday (12 - 5 pm)
    Summer (June - Sept. 7)
    Mon.. - Sat. (10 am - 5 pm) Sunday (12 - 5 pm)
    Fall (Sept. 9 - Dec.)
    Wed. - Sat. (11 am - 5 pm) Sunday (12 - 5 pm)
    The Last Admission To The Museum Is At 4:15

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    Old Sandusky Post Office State Marker

    by Yaqui Written Nov 24, 2010

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    The marker reads:
    This U.S. Post Office building, Sandusky's third, opened in 1927. replacing a smaller building at Columbus Avenue and Market Street. It is notable for its fine Neoclassical-style architecture and its unusual curved portico. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. For sixty years it served as Sandusky's business center, where merchants shipped and received goods and banks transferred money. During this time it also housed local offices for several federal agencies, including U.S. Customs, the National Weather Service, armed forces recruiting, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The U.S. Geological Survey disk embedded in the front steps serves as a benchmark for surveyors and scientist. Closed in 1987, the historic Sandusky Post Office building reopened as a museum in 1990.

    The Ohio Bicentennial Commission, The Longaberger Company, Huron City Schools, The Merry Go Round Museum, The Ohio Historical Society 2001
    18-22

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    Erie County Court House 1874

    by Yaqui Written Nov 24, 2010

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    The Erie County Courthouse was built in 1874 and designed by architects Myer and Holmes. Located at 323 Columbus Ave. in the county seat of Sandusky, the courthouse remains in use and today and houses the Erie County Court of Common Pleas and its probate, juvenile, domestic relations divisions and family court.

    Originally, the courthouse featured three statues of Lady Justice above the entrance and a mansard roof with corner towers capped with iron cresting. The courthouse under went major remodeling in the late 1930s when the mansard roof and ornamentation were replaced by a smooth limestone Art Deco style architecture exterior and Art Deco clock tower. The original stone exterior is still visible along with some arched windows on the lower floors.

    Erie County is named after the Erie Indian Tribe.http://www.supremecourt.ohio.gov/Courthouses/erie.asp

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    Invisible Plane To Freedom Statue

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 24, 2010

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    This wonderful statue is located in Shoreline Park near the downtown area of Sandusky. It is by Artist Susan Schultz and the plaque reads:
    This sculpture represents a black family crossing an invisible plane to freedom. By depicting a man who is not starving, is clean shaven, and has a hair cut of today, my hope is for people to ask themselves: "Has the black family truly crossed that plane today?" and if not.... "Am I helping or hindering the transition?"

    They have other little plaques that circle this statue with information of the history of this area.

    Plaque 1:
    Sandusky and The Underground Railroad
    (Has a map that shows the direct of how the underground would travel) The people of Sandusky, both black and white, made this city a major stop on the long journey to liberty known as the Underground Railroad.

    Plaque 2:
    Fugitives and Freedom Houses in Sandusky
    The Underground Railroad was a secret network of safe houses, including the Sloane House (above). For many slaves, escaping meant traveling alone on foot at night, following the North Star.

    Plaque 3:
    After the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 was passed, anyone found guilty of harboring or assisting runaways could be fined or imprisoned. Attorneys Francis Parish (L) and Rush Sloane (R) were both fined large sums.

    Plaque 4:
    Employers and Fugitive Workers
    Christopher Columbus Keech (above), who owned a hat factory, and Henry Merry, a builder, employed fugitives while they were waiting for the opportunity to escape to Canada.

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    The Underground Railroad

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 24, 2010

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    The Marker Reads:

    The Underground Railroad was neither underground nor a railroad, but a system of loosely connected safe havens where those escaping the brutal conditions of slavery were sheltered, fed, clothed, nursed, concealed, disguised, and instructed during their journey to freedom. Although this movement was one of American's greatest social, moral, and humanitarian endeavors, the details about it were often cloaked in secrecy to protect those involved from the retribution of civil law and slave-catchers. Ohio history has been permanently shaped by the thousands of runaway slaves passing through or finding permanent residence in this state.

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