Sandusky Things to Do

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  • Things to Do
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  • Things to Do
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Best Rated Things to Do in Sandusky

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    The Sandusky State Theatre 1928

    by Yaqui Written Mar 14, 2010

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    This landmark has been servcing its community since 1928 with many venues of entertainment over its lifetime. The theatre can seat 1500 that underwent renovation in 1992. Now it's Erie County's largest not-for-profit arts organization.

    BOX OFFICE
    The Sandusky State Theatre
    107 Columbus Avenue
    Sandusky, Ohio, 44870
    Purchase Tickets: 419-626-1950 or toll free 1-877-626-1950

    Box Office Window Hours:
    Monday - Friday 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM

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    G. A. Boeckling building 1928

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 24, 2010

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    Sandusky has one of the oldest historical downtown areas. It has been loveling restored and maintained. The marker reads:

    This building served as Cedar Point's winter offices from 1928 and after for Mr. Boeckling, the entrepreneur who first developed the resort into an amusement park. Because the Bay freezes in the winter, this site offered a convenient location to conduct the Park's business in the off season.

    This structure is a fine example of amusement park architecture. The Spanish motif and the aquatic symbols carved in the window keystones are interesting embellishments to the exterior.

    Sunduskians fondly remember the "G.A. Boeckling," which ferried thousands of park visitors who had arrived at the foot of Columbus Avenue by train or automobile.

    Donated by the Sandusky Main Street Association.

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    Hubbard's Block 1854

    by Yaqui Updated Mar 14, 2010

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    Sandusky has one of the oldest historical downtown areas. It has been loveling restored and maintained. Hubbard's Block (101 West Water Street) was designed by architect Sheldon Smith in 1854. Owned by Lester Hubbard, this Romanesque building was home to the Cosmopolitan Art and Literary Association, a national organization devoted to the dissemination of magazines and original art works. It's galleries were also located here. The building is made of limestone and sandstone features rounded windows and an iron stairway leading to the second floor that is ornamented with geometric petals.(Treasure by the Bay: The Historic Architecture of Sandusky, Ohio By: Ellie Damm (1989: Associated University Presses, Inc. pp. 53, 56, 170) & http://www.ci.sandusky.oh.us/local-attractions/historic-downtown.htm

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    Cedarpoint Amusement Park

    by Yaqui Updated Mar 13, 2010

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    In the summer of 1870, local businessperson Louis Zistel opened a small beer garden, bathhouse and dance floor on the peninsula. He would bring guests over to Cedar Point on his steamboat, Young Reindeer, for the modest price of 25 cents. By the 1880s it was noted in the local paper that “sailing and bathing parties to Cedar Point are all the rage.”

    The history of thrill rides at Cedar Point began in 1892 with the introduction of the peninsula’s first roller coaster, the Switchback Railway. The addition of the 25-foot-tall, 10-mph scream machine would forever shape the future of Cedar Point. Later years would bring a wide variety of rides, roller coasters, games, shows and more. Visionaries such as George Boeckling, George Roose, Emile Legros, Robert L. Munger, Jr. and Richard Kinzel have all played a significant part in creating the ultimate amusement park that more than 3 million guests trek to each and every summer.http://www.cedarpoint.com/public/news/history/index.cfm

    Cedarpoint was fun and it has some of the fastest and scariest rides you will ever experience. There are lots of rides there for all ages to enjoy. Lots of places to eat and lots of places to browse and enjoy. It holds many wonderful memories of when my hubby was growing up and this place was always the highlight of the summer.

    Hours change so make sure to checkout the web site:

    Hours of Operation

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    Kalaha Resorts

    by Yaqui Written Mar 13, 2010

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    Over the years, we have passed by this place when visiting relatives. To see it is to believe it! It has indoor surfing, huge wave pool, magnificent lazy river, tube slides, body slides, family raft rides, zero depth entry interactive play areas and so much more! A really neat place to bring the whole family. It is great during winter months here since it is all inside.

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    Schade & Mylander Plaza

    by Yaqui Written Mar 14, 2010

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    This plaza is centrally located with the lovely historical downtown area. Located at the foot of Columbus Ave facing the beautiful Sandusky Bay, Marblehead, and Cedar Point Park. Lots of benches and landscapes to enjoy. It's handicap accessible too.

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    Johnson Island Eric County Marker

    by Yaqui Updated Mar 14, 2010

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    The plaque reads: Johnson's Island, in the Bay opposite of Sandusky, was a prison for Confederate soldiers 1862-1865. Nothing remains of prison except for its cemetery and the earthwork of two old forts.

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    Underground Railroad Erie County Marker

    by Yaqui Updated Mar 14, 2010

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    The plaque reads: Many homes in Sandusky and other parts of Eric County were station on the Underground Railroad before and during the Civil War. Residents provided food, shelter, clothing and transportation to Canada. Harriet Beecher Stowe used Sandusky as the gate to freedom for the run-aways slaves in her book "Uncle Tom's Cabin".

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    Firelands Winery

    by Yaqui Written Mar 14, 2010

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    My mother in law wanted to visited this place so we accomodated her. It was a lovely experience because the folks here were so accomodating to her and with her special needs. TThey have single and groups tours too. We bought some wine and we really enjoyed it.

    Winery Hours
    June through September
    Monday - Thursday 9 am to 5 pm - Friday and Saturday 9 am to 6pm - Sunday 1 pm to 5 pm

    October through May
    Monday - Friday 9 am to 5 pm - Saturday 9 am to 5 pm (October - December)
    10 am to 4 pm (January - May)

    Tasting Room & Gift Shop open year round. Firelands Winery is closed on Thanksgiving, Christmas & New Years Day.

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    Invisible Plane To Freedom Statue

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 24, 2010

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    This wonderful statue is located in Shoreline Park near the downtown area of Sandusky. It is by Artist Susan Schultz and the plaque reads:
    This sculpture represents a black family crossing an invisible plane to freedom. By depicting a man who is not starving, is clean shaven, and has a hair cut of today, my hope is for people to ask themselves: "Has the black family truly crossed that plane today?" and if not.... "Am I helping or hindering the transition?"

    They have other little plaques that circle this statue with information of the history of this area.

    Plaque 1:
    Sandusky and The Underground Railroad
    (Has a map that shows the direct of how the underground would travel) The people of Sandusky, both black and white, made this city a major stop on the long journey to liberty known as the Underground Railroad.

    Plaque 2:
    Fugitives and Freedom Houses in Sandusky
    The Underground Railroad was a secret network of safe houses, including the Sloane House (above). For many slaves, escaping meant traveling alone on foot at night, following the North Star.

    Plaque 3:
    After the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 was passed, anyone found guilty of harboring or assisting runaways could be fined or imprisoned. Attorneys Francis Parish (L) and Rush Sloane (R) were both fined large sums.

    Plaque 4:
    Employers and Fugitive Workers
    Christopher Columbus Keech (above), who owned a hat factory, and Henry Merry, a builder, employed fugitives while they were waiting for the opportunity to escape to Canada.

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    Erie County Court House 1874

    by Yaqui Written Nov 24, 2010

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    The Erie County Courthouse was built in 1874 and designed by architects Myer and Holmes. Located at 323 Columbus Ave. in the county seat of Sandusky, the courthouse remains in use and today and houses the Erie County Court of Common Pleas and its probate, juvenile, domestic relations divisions and family court.

    Originally, the courthouse featured three statues of Lady Justice above the entrance and a mansard roof with corner towers capped with iron cresting. The courthouse under went major remodeling in the late 1930s when the mansard roof and ornamentation were replaced by a smooth limestone Art Deco style architecture exterior and Art Deco clock tower. The original stone exterior is still visible along with some arched windows on the lower floors.

    Erie County is named after the Erie Indian Tribe.http://www.supremecourt.ohio.gov/Courthouses/erie.asp

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    Old Sandusky Post Office State Marker

    by Yaqui Written Nov 24, 2010

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    The marker reads:
    This U.S. Post Office building, Sandusky's third, opened in 1927. replacing a smaller building at Columbus Avenue and Market Street. It is notable for its fine Neoclassical-style architecture and its unusual curved portico. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. For sixty years it served as Sandusky's business center, where merchants shipped and received goods and banks transferred money. During this time it also housed local offices for several federal agencies, including U.S. Customs, the National Weather Service, armed forces recruiting, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The U.S. Geological Survey disk embedded in the front steps serves as a benchmark for surveyors and scientist. Closed in 1987, the historic Sandusky Post Office building reopened as a museum in 1990.

    The Ohio Bicentennial Commission, The Longaberger Company, Huron City Schools, The Merry Go Round Museum, The Ohio Historical Society 2001
    18-22

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    The Merry-Go-Round Museum

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 24, 2010

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    Here is one of the largest collection of beautiful carousel animals seen in the U.S. They have some rare carousel animals seen by the public. After they are brought here, some are missing parts or need to be totally to be stripped, repainted, and or a piece re-carved. It's painstakingly time consuming because they want to do the job right to return a piece of folk art back to its former glory.

    Adults $6
    Seniors (60 & Over) $5
    Children (Ages 4 - 14) $4
    Children 3 and under free

    Months/Days/Times - That The Museum Is Open
    Jan. And Feb.
    Weekends - Saturday (11 - 5 pm) Sunday (12 - 5 pm)
    Spring (March - May)
    Wed. - Sat. (11 am - 5 pm) Sunday (12 - 5 pm)
    Summer (June - Sept. 7)
    Mon.. - Sat. (10 am - 5 pm) Sunday (12 - 5 pm)
    Fall (Sept. 9 - Dec.)
    Wed. - Sat. (11 am - 5 pm) Sunday (12 - 5 pm)
    The Last Admission To The Museum Is At 4:15

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    The Underground Railroad

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 24, 2010

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    The Marker Reads:

    The Underground Railroad was neither underground nor a railroad, but a system of loosely connected safe havens where those escaping the brutal conditions of slavery were sheltered, fed, clothed, nursed, concealed, disguised, and instructed during their journey to freedom. Although this movement was one of American's greatest social, moral, and humanitarian endeavors, the details about it were often cloaked in secrecy to protect those involved from the retribution of civil law and slave-catchers. Ohio history has been permanently shaped by the thousands of runaway slaves passing through or finding permanent residence in this state.

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    Saint Mary's 1873

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 24, 2010

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    On June 20, 1855 six men signed a note to purchase property in Sandusky, Ohio. In a few short months, St. Mary’s Catholic Church was completed on that lot. The German immigrants of the city, who had been worshiping at Holy Angels, succeeded in founding the second Catholic parish in Sandusky. Since that day, two church buildings, five school buildings, two cemeteries, two rectories, and two convents have been built. In addition, several thousand parishioners have been baptized and buried. Countless children have been educated. Untold numbers of people assisted with clothes, food, money, support and prayers.

    The Germans who immigrated to Sandusky were first led by Fr. John P. Dolweck. Appointed by Rt. Rev. Louis Amadeus Rappe, Bishop of the Diocese of Cleveland, Fr. Dolweck began serving the people of Sandusky in 1853, while still at Holy Angels. Fr. Dolweck was succeeded by Fr. James J. Hamene, who completed construction of the first Church and a rectory. In 1857 St. Mary’s built their first school.

    Several pastors served at St. Mary’s during the Civil War era, each contributing to the growth of the parish and school.

    In 1873, under the direction of Fr. Nicholas Moes, the parish embarked upon a huge construction project, a new church. Noted architect Franz Georg Himpler was employed to plan and oversee the construction. Seven years later, the beautiful new church was dedicated by Bishop Ignatius Horstmann to Mary, Mother of Sorrows. The largest church in the city of Sandusky, this building continues to serve as a home for all parish activities and the center of faith.

    In 1918, Fr. Joseph S. Widmann, who served St. Mary’s his entire 26 year priestly career, died. Fr. Widmann was responsible for building the three story school still in use. He was also pastor when the new Diocese of Toledo was erected.http://stmarysandusky.org/history.html

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