Guthrie Things to Do

  • MERRY CHRISTMAS
    MERRY CHRISTMAS
    by Rich62
  • CHRISTMAS LIGHTS
    CHRISTMAS LIGHTS
    by Rich62
  • CHRISTMASTIME IN GUTHRIE
    CHRISTMASTIME IN GUTHRIE
    by Rich62

Most Recent Things to Do in Guthrie

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Beautiful Murals

    by Yaqui Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    3 more images

    As you all probably know, is that I love murals. I cannot stop and not take the time to take pictures of them. They had some wonderful ones in the area I had parked the rental car. So as you can see, I clicked away. I think if you visit here make sure you bring your camera ok. So get out and explore and have some fun:-)

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Historical State Capital Publishing Museum

    by Yaqui Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Guthrie has some wonderful museums to enjoy and this is one of them. It was actually still publishing till 1911 and still had some of the operations for the company who were still operating from the building until 1973. Of course it is on the National Register of Historical Places and houses the history of the state, town to city and a look back of what it was to live in the turn of the century.

    Hours of Operation:
    Thursday - Saturday: 9am - 5pm

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Downtown area

    by Yaqui Updated Oct 25, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Once you venture into the downtown area, you'll become immediately immersed at what beautiful architecture this town has to offer. You can surely spend the day just wondering around and taking in the sights and beauty. The have many types of seasonal events happening so are sure to checkout the calendar at their web site. Lots of shopping and eateries to enjoy.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Foucart Building

    by mrclay2000 Updated Sep 13, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Foucart Building

    Restored in 1980 to its original features, this building was constructed in 1891 to house the Boston Dry Goods store. Later proprietors included other dry goods merchants, the National Biscuit Co., and an automobile agency. From the mid 1920s to the mid 1970s, furniture exclusively was sold in the building. Joseph Foucart, who designed this building and many of Guthrie's most prominent, had his offices here on the third floor in the 1890s.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Victor Building Interior

    by mrclay2000 Written Sep 13, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Victor Building interior

    The entrance to the Victor Building is underneath an oriel window, from which the visitor proceeds into a lobby that for all intents and purposes resembles a frontier bank of the 1890s. There is nothing in the information to support this, so the "teller" windows are probably part of the territorial offices of yesteryear. A little farther into the interior are the vaults and counting rooms. Photographs are encouraged.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Victor Building

    by mrclay2000 Written Sep 13, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Victor Building

    Built in 1893 by Winfield S. Smith, this "block" was the triumph of its time. Besides Lillie's Drug Store, the Victor Building contained several territorial offices, a few saloons, a wholesale liquor business and a ballroom on its third floor. Perhaps most interesting of its marvels, its basement connected to other Guthrie buildings via a series of tunnels, until the basement became a bowling alley in the late 1960s.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Fine Building Well Preserved

    by mrclay2000 Updated May 21, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    inside the State Capital Publishing Co.

    Except perhaps for the Oklahoma Frontier Drugstore Museum, the State Capital Publishing Co. seems the least removed from its early 20th-century activities. It looks no different today than it did when finished in 1902. Like the streets outside, the simplest imagination can easily picture a veritable hive of activity in the counting room, the press room and all the other well-preserved chambers in this turn-of-the-century honeycomb of power and prestige.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    A Copper for the Cause

    by mrclay2000 Updated May 21, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    inside the State Capital Publishing Co.

    Like many others, this building was designed by Belgium-born Joseph Foucart, who gave its northeast crown its distinctive "turret." Today, the State Capital Publishing Co. is one of Guthrie's top museums, featuring an extensive collection of early printing presses, historical prints and other memorabilia. Admission is free, but the suggested donation is a few dollars.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Let the Editors Spin in their Graves

    by mrclay2000 Written May 21, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    State Capital Publishing Co.

    Built in 1902, the State Capital Publishing Co. is to my mind the building in Guthrie. Occupying its prominent place at the SW corner of Second and Harrison, the editors could watch much of the local goings-on without ever leaving their offices (and as the press, who ever needed firsthand knowledge of anything to report it in the paper?). Today the building stands as one of Guthrie's landmark structures.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Frontier Flophouse

    by mrclay2000 Updated May 21, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Miss Lizzie's parlor

    I knew you were particularly interested in this next tip. Miss Lizzie's Bordello was also under the watchful eye of the editors from the State Capital Publishing Co. across the street (it yet remains a mystery which came into existence first. . .). Equipped with sixteen rooms each about 10' x 10', the larger-than-modern-sized employees presumably had sufficient space to execute their bargains in somewhat guarded privacy (though entertaining sixteen customers at once probably risked imploding the building). Pictured here is the main parlor upstairs with three rooms showing.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    If Walls Could Talk

    by mrclay2000 Written May 20, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    looking down the stairwell (Miss Lizzie's)

    Madame lived in an upstairs apartment near the stairwell, and thus was the first person to greet prospective clients, or police detectives, or both (if they came off duty). Historically the fire station has always been located "across the street." Strangely, the first Firemen's Ball in Guthrie was held at Miss Lizzie's. There remain today many legends of "firemen who helped ladies upstairs over the years."

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Glossy Prossy

    by mrclay2000 Written May 20, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    typical room (Miss Lizzie's Bordello)

    Today, Miss Lizzie's Bordello is a knick-knack, jewelry and gift shop. Each of the sixteen rooms is now a separate showroom, but a bathtub from 1903 is original and still in situ. As a "well-respected" businesswoman who was "active" in church and civic affairs, Miss Lizzie (Madame) saw that her girls wore pretty clothes and had three hot meals daily. She was also particularly proud that her girls "married well," and probably not bashful that eminent politicians and businessmen entered from a discreet catwalk from the second floor. It remains a law in Guthrie prohibiting the exhibition of bare limbs from upstairs windows. In other words, do not wave to your friends in the street.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Humble Beginnings for the Rich and Famous

    by mrclay2000 Written May 20, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Blue Bell Saloon

    The Blue Bell Saloon stands at the northeast corner of Second and Harrison, and for various reasons this spot occupies the highest rung in my favorite tidbits on Guthrie. Even though it still serves burgers and steaks and cocktails, I chose not to put it under restaurants because of two things. It lies catty-cornered from the State Capital Publishing Co., and thus its reporters could watch who frequented the pub (and more especially who was thrown out). The Blue Bell also lies adjacent to a former bordello, and when editorial eyes weren't on the saloon, they were tabulating the not-so-private visits next door. Perhaps most intriguing of all is that Tom Mix, who later went on to become America's highest paid actor in the silent film industry, served as a lowly bartender here between 1902 and 1904.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Oklahoma Frontier Drugstore Museum

    by mrclay2000 Written May 20, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Oklahoma Frontier Drugstore Museum

    This museum is also one of the few places in town (besides an eating establishment) that offers you a chance to sit and rest on a hot afternoon (or after miles in town), and still crane your neck to read things on the walls and on the shelves. Since there are literally thousands of items here that you generally have never laid eyes on before, the Oklahoma Frontier Drugstore Museum holds several distinctions among other attractions in town.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Frontier Laboratory

    by mrclay2000 Written May 20, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    frontier pharmacist's mixing room

    The Oklahoma Frontier Drugstore Museum is easily one of the most interesting attractions in Guthrie, and certainly one of the best-stocked, best-informed, authentic frontier museums I've ever seen. You will be encouraged to take every conceivable photograph, to venture into every room, and to read every label you can tolerate. As with most buildings of the period (1890s), the hall is long and narrow. Exploring every corner is easily concluded in the space of fifteen minutes.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Guthrie

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

108 travelers online now

Comments

Guthrie Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Guthrie things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Guthrie sightseeing.

View all Guthrie hotels