OKC National Memorial and Museum, Oklahoma City

5 out of 5 stars 40 Reviews

620 N. Harvey 405.235.3313 or 888.542.HOPE
  • PART OF
    PART OF "THE FIELD OF CHAIRS"
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  • THE MYRIAD OF REMEMBERANCE ITEMS LEFT ON WALLS
    THE MYRIAD OF REMEMBERANCE ITEMS LEFT ON...
    by DennyP
  • OKC National Memorial and Museum
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  • el_ruso's Profile Photo

    Memorial

    by el_ruso Written Mar 6, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is built on the site of the government building that was blown up by a crazy sick guy, called McVeigh.

    It is surprisingly creative and solemn - not an expected plaque or statue. It is in fact very impressive.

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  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Oklahoma City National Memorial

    by Yaqui Updated Dec 30, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I am thankful I went with friends to see this momument. It made it joyful to be with them otherwise I would have been to sadden to stay. They did a wonderful job in the building and design of this monument in paying tribute to those we all lost so dear that day on April 19, 1995 at 9:02am. I think we all hope and prayed it would never happen again, but 911 has changed that hope forever. The gates of time, reflecting pool and all the empty chairs, especially the litte ones will always be etched in my memory and heart. God bless them all!

    "Never give up and never forget!"

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  • damaris05's Profile Photo

    OK City Bombing Memorial

    by damaris05 Written Aug 15, 2004

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Even if you're not from Oklahoma, or didn't have friends or relatives that were victims of the OKC Bombing... This poignant memorial will mess you up! It surely changed the way I look at life... take advantage of every moment with those you love because you never know what will happen next.

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  • rexvaughan's Profile Photo

    Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum

    by rexvaughan Updated Jul 14, 2004

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    This is a very moving memorial to those who were killed on April 19, 1995 by the bomb that Timothy McVeigh detonated in front of the Alfred Murrah Office Building. The building housed offices for several government agencies and a day care facility for their children. The bomb exploded at 9:02 a.m. and the outdoor memorial features two walls at the ends of a reflecting pool. The walls are labeled 9:01 and 9:03, enclosing the tragic moment. In the photo to the left you can see 168 chairs, one for each victim including smaller ones for the children. This is a very moving and poignantly beautiful memorial. I have not visited the museum yet, but my wife found it very well done and moving saying she had never seen one like it. It is probably the most must see of sights in the city.

    Poignantly Serene
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  • basstbn's Profile Photo

    The Oklahoma City National Memorial

    by basstbn Updated Apr 3, 2004

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    April 19, 1995: Anarchist and white-supremicist Timothy McVeigh parks a rental truck loaded with explosives in front of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building. At 9:02 a.m., a massive explosion rips the face off of the entire north side of the building. 168 people die, including 19 children. An additional 30 children became orphans, and 219 children lost at least one parent. Over 300 buildings were damaged or destroyed.

    The site is now a national memorial. You can not help but be touched with emotion while visiting these grounds, and be constantly reminded of the futility and senselessness of violence..

    Please take a moment to look at additional photographs in my travelogue.

    The Oklahoma City National Memorial
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  • Paulie_D's Profile Photo

    Oklahoma City National Memorial

    by Paulie_D Updated Nov 25, 2003

    It doesn't seem quite right to describe this as a 'Must See' but it is most definitely something EVERY visitor to OKC should experience.

    I have found that some of the most moving monuments in the world are those that are the most simple. The Vietnam Wall is one and the Oklahoma City National Memorial is, most definitely, another.

    For me, the fact that I visited this memorial to the tragedy of one act of madness on September 11th, the anniversary of another, made the visit afftected me all the more.

    The Memorial is accessible 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Rangers are on site to provide information from 10:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. daily (Spring/Summer) and from 8:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. (Fall/Winter)Rangers will not be available on Thanksgiving, Christmas or New Year's Days

    I've added a Travelogue to give more pictures and information.

    Please also visit Oklahoma City National Memorial or National Park Service websites

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  • TravelJunkie's Profile Photo

    OKC Memorial

    by TravelJunkie Written Nov 13, 2003

    The Memorial is a tribute to the April 19, 1995 bombing of the Murrah Federal building which took the lives of 168 people.

    The Memorial, opened on 4/19/2000, is beautiful and moving. The moment the bombing occured - 9:02 am - is frozen in time with monments at both ends of the plaza marked with the times of 9:01 and 9:03. The footprint of the building is now a grassy area with 168 chairs, one for each victim, placed approxomately where each person died.

    The Museum walks you through the day of the bombing and the aftermath. It did not belabor the tragegy nor did it attempt to provoke false emotion. The presentation was very factual and allowed each visitor to have a very personal experience.

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  • catwoman5353's Profile Photo

    Remembering the bombing

    by catwoman5353 Written Jun 21, 2003

    The Murrah Building memorial is one of the most touching and beautiful I have ever seen. Even if you just stop by for a minute, it's worth it. One good thing is that the memorial is open 24hrs and there's no fee to get in. If you want to go to the museum, it closes at 6pm, and there is a charge to get in. It would be worth your while to go during the day, see everything and go to the museum, then stop by after dark. It's all lit up and is really beautiful. For a great picture, see Edgeon's page.

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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Lights Welcome

    by mrclay2000 Updated Mar 30, 2003

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    If at all possible, visit the Memorial at night as well as by day. The contrast is remarkable. An evening visit also affords to the visitor the illuminated stained-glass windows on the First United Methodist Church (east of the Memorial) and the illuminated domes of the CityChurch a few blocks away to the north.

    Oklahoma City National Memorial at night
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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Wall of Remembrance

    by mrclay2000 Updated Mar 30, 2003

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    Almost immediately after the bombing, a chain-link fence was erected to preserve the site, but instead served to preserve the memories of the fallen. Nineteen children died in the second-floor daycare. The subsequent inflow from children around the nation of "care bears" literally overwhelmed the fence, along with photos, mementos and other tokens left by family and friends. This section is the "living" statement of the Memorial.

    flags, teddy bears and personal artefacts
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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Oklahoma's Worst Day - April 19, 1995

    by mrclay2000 Updated Mar 29, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I was in my boss' office at 9:00 a.m. on April 19, a bright and cloudless day, when a convulsion rumbled up from the south and rattled the windows going north. The effects were electrifying, as co-workers struggled to determine the cause. I imagined three possibilities (a) that a small plane in distress had passed just over our office, (b) that our nearby 5-story-tall newspaper presses had collapsed, or (c) that we had just felt an earthquake. A few minutes later I heard the first news about "a bomb." In our relative innocence, we little understood the meaning. "What's a bomb?"

    When the blast occurred, employees at the south end of our building turned to see a column of smoke tower over downtown. Within seconds the windows by which they stood trembled so violently -- even from 10 miles away -- that many feared they would explode. Downtown was a pandemonium. As events unfolded, radios educated the city on medical terminology. Triage - the bloodied and battered are divided by the severity of their wounds. Code black - overcrowded hospitals can accept no more patients.

    Medical personnel were flown free to OKC to assist. Little towns in Oklahoma emptied out to donate blood. By mid-afternoon, the skies darkened and began to rain on the rescuers and rescued alike. By nightfall, the number recovered was comparatively small at 20. In the end, 168 lives would be claimed, including 19 children. Today, Oklahoma City drivers run their headlights every April 19 to commemorate our common experience.

    Murrah Building, days after the blast
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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    168 Empty Chairs Illumined

    by mrclay2000 Written Mar 29, 2003

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    Along with the perimeter structures and the Gates of Time, the 168 empty chairs glow in a surreal if not heavenly light. The effects of all ambient light on the reflecting pool is something not to be missed with any nocturnal visit to Oklahoma City. In the background center, you can plainly see the light blue illuminated edge of St Anthony's Hospital, one of many area hospitals under code black on April 19, 1995.

    168 chairs and St Anthony's Hospital (background)
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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Night Falls

    by mrclay2000 Written Mar 29, 2003

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    With the coming of twilight, the perspectives at the Oklahoma City National Memorial change significantly. By day, the monument is a sober reminder of a terrible event in our history. By night, the memorial is a beautiful place.

    sundown behind the west Gate of Time
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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Empty Chairs

    by mrclay2000 Updated Mar 29, 2003

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    Along the lawn south of the reflecting pool are 168 empty chairs representing the lives lost. Each is engraved with the victim's name, with the smaller chairs representing the murdered children. Visitors are required to keep to the walk encircling the chairs. Only family members are allowed to approach the markers directly.

    168 empty chairs
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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    A Place for Reflection

    by mrclay2000 Written Mar 29, 2003

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    The reflecting pool divides the two Gates of Time, which "frame the moment of destruction" of 9:02 a.m. The east gate reads "9:01," signifying the last moment of innocence as we pursued our regular lives. The west gate is marked "9:03," when our lives changed forever. In the background (also reflected in the pool) is the Regency Tower.

    West Gate and Regency Tower
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